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The University of Texas at Austin

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Strengths - Military History

“Old Glory goes up on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima”, by Joe Rosenthal

"Old Glory goes up on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima," by Joe Rosenthal; DI-01323.

The Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin has constituted a prime source for military history since its founding. Its earliest collections—including the Bexar Archives and the Austin Papers—document military affairs of the Spanish, Mexicans, Indians, and Anglo Americans in the Southwest in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Today, with its major strengths in Texas and Southern history, Congressional history, and American news media history, the Center's resources embrace more than three-hundred years of military affairs, including many aspects of America's involvement in foreign wars, from Mexico to Iraq.

 
Walter Cronkite with flyers, as World War II correspondent for UPI.

Walter Cronkite with flyers, as World War II correspondent for UPI; DI-03515.

The Center for American History is the most important source in existence for Texas history. Its holdings document the military affairs of the region from the earliest European contacts through the twentieth century, including the Texas Revolution (1836), Indian wars, and the Civil War. The Center's Southern history resources include the massive Natchez Trace Collection, a rich source for many different aspects of the Deep South in the Civil War era. Congressional history collections contain the papers of more than sixty former members of Congress, including Albert Sidney Burleson, Sam Rayburn, John Nance Garner, Maury Maverick, Sr., Lloyd Bentsen, and Henry B. Gonzalez, providing important perspectives on national policy, foreign affairs, and the conduct of war. Collections on American news media history include the papers of leading war correspondents such as Walter Cronkite, Andy Rooney, and Robert Trout, the collections of outstanding photojournalists such as David Hume Kennerly and Dirck Halstead, and the "morgues," or subject reference files, of the New York Times and other dailies and of Newsweek magazine.

The Personal Narrative of Mexican Army Officer Lt. Col. José Enrique de la Peña.

The Personal Narrative of Mexican Army Officer Lt. Col. José Enrique de la Peña; DI-00168.

These resources are available in a variety of formats, including institutional records, historical manuscripts, maps, newspapers, broadsides, photographs, and oral histories. Letters and diaries from soldiers in the field, combat photographs from America's leading photojournalists, reminiscences of war veterans, muster rolls of fighting units, posters, and broadsides with patriotic calls to action all form part of the Center's rich store of resources for the study of military history.

 
ARVN Soldiers pull out of Xuan Loc, the last government stronghold in Vietnam, © Dirck Halstead

ARVN Soldiers pull out of Xuan Loc, the last government stronghold in Vietnam; E-DH-0608.
© Dirck Halstead

Recently, the Center has deepened its commitment to the field. Building on its experience as joint sponsor of a World War II scholar program since 1998, the Center now has established the Military History Institute, an educational outreach, research, and archival program. This Institute will ensure that the programs and resources in military history at the Center for American History will continue to thrive.