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The University of Texas at Austin

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1968: The Year the Dream Died

1968: The Year the Dream Died
Now on Display at the Briscoe Center

Sid Richardson Hall, Unit 2
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas
Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m, Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m (SEE EXCEPTIONS)

1968 was one of the most tumultuous years in American history, "the year the dream died," according to reporter Jules Witcover, "when the sensitivities and nerve endings of millions of Americans were assaulted almost beyond bearing." The year's riots, assassinations, resignations, and innovations stand out because of how they were documented. The Briscoe Center's news media collections—including Witcover's papers—speak powerfully to 1968's themes and events. Journalists recorded not simply what happened, but how it felt and how it would be remembered. All materials on display are drawn from collections housed at the center. When not on display, these items are available to researchers in the center's reading room.

 
Weatherby Map Collection

Highlights from the Weatherby Map Collection
Now on Display at the Briscoe Center

Sid Richardson Hall, Unit 2
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas
Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m, Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m (SEE EXCEPTIONS)

View some of the finest examples from the late T. Karman Weatherby's collection of more than 4,000 maps, engravings, and related materials, donated to the Briscoe Center by his family in 2013 and now available to researchers. The selections here show visual evidence of changing national borders and state boundaries in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries and the growth of Texas through the Republic era and into statehood. These examples vividly illustrate ways in which nations and states viewed themselves geographically and across time, and how mapmakers and publishers chose to communicate a sense of place and population.