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Texas House Speakers Oral History Project -
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Guide to 11th through 20th Speakers

Guide to 11th through 20th Speakers

HAMILTON PRIOLEAU BEE
(1822–1897)
11th Speaker
(1855–1897)

Presided over

The 6th Legislature's regular session, November 5, 1855 to February 4, 1856; and the 6th Legislature's adjourned session, July 7 to September 1, 1856.

Born in Charleston, South Carolina, Hamilton P. Bee moved as a youth with his family to Texas. Bee's father, Barnard E. Bee, who arrived in Texas two years earlier, had already served the Republic of Texas as secretary of war, secretary of state, and as ambassador to the United States. In 1839, at the age of 17, Hamilton Bee won appointment as secretary for the commission that established the boundary between the Republic of Texas and the United States, and just four years later Texas President Sam Houston sent Bee with two other men to conduct peace negotiations with the Comanches, negotiations that resulted in the Treaty of Tehuacana Creek. By 1846 Bee became secretary of the Texas Senate.

Bee served in the military during the 1846 to 1848 Mexican-American War and rose to the rank of first lieutenant. Bee moved to Laredo following the war and won election to the Texas House of Representatives, where he served from 1849 through 1859. From 1855–1857, he served an uneventful term as speaker. He remained in the House for one more term following his speakership. After leaving the House in 1859, Bee moved to Goliad County and established a ranch along the San Antonio River.

When the Civil War broke out, his military comrades elected Bee brigadier general of the militia in 1861. Bee then won appointment as brigadier general in the Confederate Army on March 4, 1862. Bee held command of the lower Rio Grande District, with his headquarters located in Brownsville. One of his major missions was to oversee the import of European munitions through Mexico and to ensure that cotton used for payment was successfully exported.

On November 4, 1863, he led an evacuation and retreat after a major Union force invaded Brownsville. Military historians credit Bee's actions during this retreat with preventing millions of dollars worth of Confederate stores and munitions from capture by the Union Army. By the spring of 1864, Bee was given combat command, where he proved less successful.

After the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, Bee lived in exile for 11 years in Mexico. By 1876 he had returned to San Antonio. He died there on October 3, 1897.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Bee

Books:

Confederate military history. Written by Clement Anselm Evans. Atlanta: Confederate Publishing Co., 1899.

HRC STARK 1071-1082 HRC STK Stark Collection. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 Humanities Research Center. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.1 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.2 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.3 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.4 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.5 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.6 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.7 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.8 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.9 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.10 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.11 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 V.12 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.13 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.14 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.15 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.16 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.17 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 1987 V.1 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.2 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.3 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.4 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.7 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.8 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.9 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.10 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.11 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.12 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.13 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.14 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.15 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.16 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.16 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 484 E9 1987 V.17 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1987 V.17 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 484 E926 1989 Index V.1 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 INDEX V.2 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.1 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.2 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.3 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.4 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.5 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.6 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.7 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.8 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.9 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.10 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.11 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E926 1989 V.12 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Confederate military history: a library of Confederate States history, in thirteen volumes. Written by distinguished men of the South and edited by Gen. Clement A. Evans of Georgia. Reprint. Secaucus, N. J.: Blue & Grey Press, 197–.

E 484 E9 1970Z V.5 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1970Z V.6 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1970Z V.11 PCL Stacks
E 484 E9 1970Z V.11 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 484 E9 1970Z V.15 PCL Stacks

Texas in the war, 1861–1865. Compiled by Marcus J. Wright. Edited and notes written by Harold B. Simpson. Hillsboro, Tex.: Hill Junior College Press, 1965.

E 580 W7 PCL Stacks
E 580 W7 PCL Stacks
E 580 W7 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 580 W7 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 580 W7 1965 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 580 W7 1965 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
973.7464 W934T PCL Stacks Library Storage - Request Online OR ask at Circulation Desk

Texas veterans in the Mexican War: muster rolls of Texas military units. Compiled by Charles D. Spurlin. Victoria, Tex.: C. D. Spurlin, (c. 1984).

E 409 S68 1984 PCL Stacks
E 409 S68 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Generals in gray: lives of the Confederate commanders. Written by Ezra J. Warner. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959.

973.742 W243G PCL Stacks
973.742 W243G PCL Stacks Copy 2
973.742 W243G PCL Stacks Copy 3
T973.742 W243G Center for American History. Use in library only.

Documents:

Twohig, John, papers, 1835–1944. Center for American History.

Note: Collection includes Hamilton Prioleau Bee's papers.

Vertical File: Hamilton P. Bee (Center for American History)

The file contains a typed copy of a biographical sketch of Hamilton Bee from Texas and Texans, Volume 3, which ran in the June 1932 issue of the Frontier Times published in Bandera,  Texas. The file also holds a biography of Bee written by John Henry Brown, a nineteenth-century mayor of Galveston and of Dallas, as well as a one-time state legislator. Brown's biography of Bee is from a circa 1907 edition of Texas Farm and Ranch. Also included in the file is a June 16, 1943, letter from the National Archives in response to a request for a list of men who participated in the Battle of the Nueces River in Texas in August 1962. P. M. Hamer, the Director of Reference Services for the National Archives, notes that the reports of Brigadier General Hamilton Bee are printed in the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, Series I, Volume IX, page 614, and Volume LIII, page 454.

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WILLIAM S. TAYLOR
(1795 or 1796–1858)
12th Speaker
(1857–1858)

Presided over

Part of the 7th Legislature's regular session November 2, 1857 to January 18, 1858.

Born in Georgia in either 1795 or 1796, William S. Taylor appears to have served in the legislatures of three different states. At some point he moved to Alabama, and served with the state militia that fought in the First and Second Seminole wars (1817–1818 and 1835–1842) in neighboring Florida. He eventually rose to the rank of brigadier general. He represented Fayette County in the Alabama Legislature from 1833 to 1842. Shortly afterward, Taylor moved to Tippah County, Mississippi, where in 1844 he was elected to the state House of Representatives.

Taylor had moved to Cherokee County in Texas by 1850. Taylor practiced law and ran a plantation. He was first elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1855 and rose to the speakership in his second term on November 2, 1857. Illness forced him to resign from the leadership post by letter on January 18, 1858.

Matthew F. Locke, who had already filled in as speaker pro tempore for three weeks, was elected as speaker for the remainder of the 7th Legislature's term. On July 22, 1858, after battling illness for seven months, Taylor died at his home in Larissa.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Taylor

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Taylor, William Stanhope (Center for American History)

The file contains seven typed copies of a brief biographical sketch of Taylor's son from The Heroes of San Jacinto, noting that the younger William Taylor received land in Stephen F. Austin's colony near present-day Lavaca County in August 1831 and that he joined the Texas Army in October 1835. William Taylor was granted a headright certificate by the Milam County board of land commissioners in 1838.

An April 7, 1966, Burnet Highlander article, "Family Reunion Held by Heirs of Texas Hero," provides details of the reunion held every year in Buchanan Dam and a list of those attending. The file contains a February 8, 1936, letter from Mrs. Rufus N. Williamson to Miss Winnie Allen, archivist at the University of Texas, clarifying the identities of William S. Taylor and his son and a third similarly named man active in early Texas. The file contains other correspondence between Williamson and Allen. This series of letters provides a copy of a eulogy Taylor provided for House member J. C. Harrison on the floor of the Legislature.

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MATTHEW FIELDING LOCKE
(1824–1911)
13th Speaker
(1858–1859)

Presided over

Part of the 7th Legislature's regular session, December 1857 to February 16, 1858.

Born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on July 20, 1824, Locke moved to Marshall County Mississippi at age 12. He served with the Mississippi Regiment of Volunteers during the 1846 to 1848 Mexican-American War and served as a bodyguard to the regiment commander, future Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

In 1850 he moved to Upshur County in East Texas where he developed a plantation near Lafayette. Elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1855, he became speaker pro tempore for three weeks in December of 1857 during his second term when his predecessor, William S. Taylor, became too ill to serve. The House received Taylor's letter of resignation on January 18, 1858, and Locke was elected speaker.

Locke attended the Texas 1861 secession convention and was part of the committee that informed Governor Sam Houston, a lifelong friend, that he had been ousted from his position by the convention. Locke won election to the state Senate but declined to serve when the Civil War broke out in 1861, believing that he had an obligation to enlist in the Confederate military.

Appointed colonel of the Texas Cavalry by Gov. Edward Clark, Locke raised a regiment that became part of the 10th Texas Cavalry of the Confederate Army. He saw combat action in the Western theater of the war. He settled in Arkansas after the Confederacy's surrender and founded the town of Alma. He became Arkansas' first commissioner of agriculture in 1887. He remained in Arkansas until 1909 when his wife's illness prompted a decision to move back to Texas, this time in El Paso, where he died in 1911.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Locke

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Locke, Matt Fielding (Center for American History)

The file includes a typed copy of an article on Matthew Fielding Locke by A. A. North of Nashville that ran in Confederate Veteran, Volume 20 (1912), p. 317. The one-and-a-half page article briefly details Locke's life before the Civil War and then describes his military exploits.

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MARION DEKALB TAYLOR
(1818–1897)
14th, 18th, and 22nd Speaker
(1859–1861, 1863–1866, 1873–1874)

Presided over

The 8th Legislature's regular session, November 7, 1859 to February 13, 1860; the 8th Legislature's 1st called session, January 21 to February 9, 1861; and the 8th Legislature's adjourned session, March 18 to April 9, 1861.

The 10th Legislature's regular session, November 2 to December 16, 1863; the 10th Legislature's 1st called session, May 9 to May 28, 1864; and the 10th Legislature's 2nd called session, October 17 to November 15, 1864.

The 13th Legislature's regular session, January 14 to June 4, 1873.

Born in Jones County, Georgia, on October 13, 1818, Marion DeKalb Taylor was the son of a blacksmith, farmer, and Methodist preacher, who moved the family to Butler County, Alabama, before 1822. By age 15, Taylor already ran the family's stagecoach business. By age 20, Taylor owned his own farm, but poor health forced him to change careers and he began studying medicine under a local doctor. Butler County voters elected Taylor to the Alabama Legislature in 1842. Defeated for reelection in 1844 because of his support for Texas annexation, he nevertheless won a seat the next year and served through 1846.

Taylor settled in Cass County (present-day Marion County), Texas, in 1847 and became one of the founders of Sharon Union School there in 1853. Taylor plunged into politics in Texas as he had in Alabama and served a cumulative twenty-four years in the Texas Legislature, representing Cass County in the House in the Third Legislature in 1850 and in the Senate in the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Legislatures.

While serving in the Legislature he advocated government assistance for East Texas industry and helped organized Marion County. He first became speaker in 1859. He used his position in 1859 as chairman of the joint session of the Legislature to support secessionist Louis T. Wigfall's election to the United States Senate. (At that time, senators were not elected but selected by state legislatures. Direct election of United States senators did not take place until after the ratification of the 13th Amendment in 1913).

His second tenure as speaker at the height of the Civil War, from 1863 to 1865, posed particular challenges. The Union Navy blockaded the Texas coast and the Union army separated Texas from the rest of the Confederacy. The cash-strapped state sought to subsidize the manufacture of guns, powder, and clothing for soldiers and engineered a program whereby cotton was shipped overland to Mexico and traded for wartime materials. Lawmakers were paid in worthless currency and many camped in tents and in the Capitol, cooking on the lawn when the Legislature was in session.

His last session as speaker came in 1873 when Taylor and his fellow Democrats re-gained control of the state Legislature from the Republicans. They still had to deal with Republican Governor Edmund J. Davis. Taylor, over a gubernatorial veto, helped strip Davis of many of the powers governors had gained during Reconstruction.

Taylor served as president of the Democratic State Convention in 1876, 1878, and in 1880. In 1879 he again represented the Jefferson District in the Sixteenth Legislature of Texas. Taylor died from a fall on June 22, 1897.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Taylor

Books:

Marion County, Texas, 1860–1870. Written by Lucille Blackburn Bullard. Jefferson, Tex.: L. B. Bullard, 1965.

F 392 M3 B8 Center for American History. Use in library only.

A Legislative manual for the state of Texas. (1st-2d ed.), 1879–1880, 1882–1883. Austin, E. W. Swindells, 1879–83.

TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.1 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.1 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.1 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 3. Use in library only.
TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.1 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 4. Use in library only.
TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.2 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 328.7648 T312ML V.2 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

Jefferson: Riverport to the Southwest. Written by Fred Tarpley. Austin: Eakin Press, c. 1983.

F 394 J43 T3 PCL Stacks
F 394 J43 T3 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 394 J43 T3 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


CONSTANTINE W. BUCKLEY
(1815–1865)
15th AND 17th Speaker
(1861, 1863)

Presided over

Part of the 9th Legislature's regular session, November 4 to December 7, 1861; and the 9th Legislature's called session, February 2 to March 7, 1863.

Born January 22, 1815, in Surrey County, North Carolina, Constantine W. Buckley fled an unhappy family life by running away to Georgia when he was 13. For five years he worked as a store clerk before becoming an independent merchant. He opened his own mercantile business in Columbus, Georgia, in 1835 but was wiped out financially by a depression two years later. This economic downturn prompted a move in 1838 to Houston, then the capital of the Texas Republic.

Buckley studied law while working as a clerk in the Department of State. The capital of Texas moved to Austin in 1839. Buckley resigned his post at the State Department, entered the bar, and opened a private law practice. After Texas was annexed as a state, Buckley was appointed judge of the state's 7th Judicial District in 1852, but resigned from the post two years later so he could resume his law practice and operate a farm. Elected in 1857 to the Texas House of Representatives from a district that included Austin and Fort Bend counties, Buckley served four terms, becoming chair of the judiciary committee in 1859, and winning election as speaker in 1861.

Buckley won election as speaker November 4 of that year, presiding over a session convened eight months after the beginning of the Civil War. During Buckley's term at the helm, the Legislature primarily dealt with issues pertaining to the war, including an amendment to the militia law that provided for military provisions against Native Americans in West Texas. With most Texas troops tied up in the struggle against the Union Army, the Legislature worried that Indians might take advantage of the situation. The Legislature also doubled taxes in order to fund assistance programs for the families of Confederate soldiers and to pay for hospitals for the war's wounded.

Buckley resigned as speaker on December 7 and was briefly replaced by Nicholas Henry Darnell. He won re-election as speaker during a special session in 1863. In 1858, while still a House member, Buckley ran unsuccessfully for associate justice of the state Supreme Court. He won re-election for a fourth term in the House in 1863, but was defeated in his bid to retain the speakership. On December 19, 1865, Buckley drowned in the Brazos River.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Buckley

Books:

The Texas album, of the eighth Legislature, 1860. Written by William DeRyee & R. E. Moore. Austin, Texas. Printed by Miner, Lambert & Perry, 1860.

TZZ 328.7648 D449T Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 328.7648 D449T Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

The question of nominations examined and elucidated. Translated from the German by Edward Kellner. Galveston: F. Flake, at the "Union" Book and Job Office, 1858.

TZZ 976.408 H293Q Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Statement of Judge C. W. Buckley's testimony in the case of Smith vs. Hadley, et al., to the people of Texas. Galveston, 1858.

TZ 329.3 K294S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Vertical File: Buckley, C. W. (Center for American History)

The file contains two items: a typed copy of a letter from Buckley to Thomas J. Rusk in Washington, D.C., dated July 7, 1852, authorizing compensation for witnesses summoned to testify against J. C. Watrous, a U. S. District Court Judge in Texas facing impeachment charges; and a page from an unknown source describing Buckley's life until 1859 when he became chairman of the Texas House Judiciary Committee.

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NICHOLAS HENRY DARNELL
(1807–1885)
16th Speaker
(1861–1862)

Presided over

Part of the 9th Legislature's regular session, December 7, 1861 to January 14, 1862.

Born in Williamson County, Tennessee, on April 20, 1807, Nicholas Henry Darnell ran for the Tennessee legislature in 1835, but lost by only eight votes. He ran without opposition and won a seat in the Tennessee General Assembly in 1837, but resigned the next year to move to San Augustine, Texas.

Darnell fought in the 1839 Cherokee War, which aimed at expelling certain Indian nations from Texas. The discovery of a Mexican government plot to support those bands against East Texas Anglo settlers sparked the war. Darnell settled at San Augustine and, under the short-lived Texas Republic, was elected from that county to the House of Representatives 1841. Returning to the Texas Congress, he was elected speaker of the House of Representatives on November 24, 1842. Darnell won re-election to the House the following year.

He participated in the "Convention of 1845" called by Texas President Anson Jones to consider the just-passed joint resolution of the United States Congress proposing the annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States. The convention met on July 4, 1845, and by a vote of fifty-five to one, delegates approved annexation. Afterward, the convention wrote a new constitution for the state of Texas.

Darnell then ran against Albert C. Horton in that year's lieutenant governor race. An initial canvass of the ballots indicated Darnell had won by a close margin, but he refused to take the oath of office until all the votes had been counted. As a result, Horton was elected. Darnell then retired from politics for the next 12 years.

In 1858 Darnell moved to Dallas and was elected to the Texas House the following year. In his second year in the state Legislature, he rose as speaker after Constantine W. Buckley stepped down from the position on December 7, 1861. Like his predecessor Buckley, Darnell found his time as speaker consumed by the Civil War. He held on to the speakership through the rest of the regular session, but resigned from the House in 1862 to enlist in the Confederate Army as colonel of the Eighteenth Texas Cavalry. Darnell returned to the Capitol to serve as assistant doorkeeper, and then doorkeeper, of the House of Representatives from 1874 to 1875. He won election to represent Dallas, Tarrant, and Ellis counties at the state's 1875 Constitutional Convention and was elected to the House again in 1876 representing Tarrant County. The father of seven children, Darnell died in Fort Worth in July 1885.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Darnell

Books:

Biographical directory of the Texan conventions and congresses, 1832–1845. Written by Ernest R. Lindley, Elizabeth LeNoir Jennett. (Austin: Texas House of Representatives, 1941.)

LAW JK 4831 T468 1941B Law Library Copy 1
LAW JK 4831 T468 1941B Law Library Copy 2
JK 4830 A54 1942 PCL Stacks
JK 4830 A54 1941 PCL Stacks
- Q - JK 4830 A54 1941 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 1941 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Biographical directory of the Texan conventions and congresses, (1832–1845). Written by Ernest R. Lindley, Elizabeth LeNoir Jennett. Sesquicentennial re-print edition. Crosby, Tex.: Sons of the Republic of Texas, 1986.

JK 4830 A54 1986 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History Copy 4. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History Vandale Collection. Use in library only.
JK 4830 A54 Center for American History Vandale Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

The encyclopedia of the new West, containing fully authenticated information of the agricultural, mercantile, commercial, manufacturing, mining and grazing industries, and representing the character, development, resources and present condition of Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, New Mexico and Indian Territory. Also, biographical sketches of their representative men and women. Edited by William S. Speer and John Henry Brown. Marshall, Tex.: The United States Biographical Publishing Company, 1881.

F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 S74 Center for American History Vandale Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 1881 Center for American History. Use in library only.
- Q - TZ 920.073 SP32E Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 920.073 SP32E Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Darnell, Nicholas Henry (Center for American History)

The file contains copies of the Veterans Administration's War of 1812 pension papers for Nicholas Darnell's father. The file also includes:

  • A typed manuscript, "Biographical Sketch of General Nicholas Henry Darnell," written by Fannie Daniel Maude Rockenbaugh, Darnell's granddaughter, in 1936.
  • A typed copy of a letter from David Boaz of Fort Worth to Darnell regarding the extension of a railroad line dated March 15, 1873.
  • An 1885 newspaper obituary from an unknown source that is mostly a personality sketch.
  • A three-page typed manuscript excerpted from "West Texas and the State Constitutional Convention of 1875," a 1933 thesis written by Texas Tech student Anne Hammon.
  • A Dallas Morning News story from September 2, 1944, noting the plan of Masons to dedicate a monument in Austin to Darnell and a column from Dallas Morning News columnist Sam Acheson emphasizing Darnell's many years in Dallas and Fort Worth.

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NATHANIEL MACON BURFORD
(1824–1898)
19th Speaker
(1866)

Presided over

The regular session of the 11th Legislature, August 6 to November 13, 1866.

Born on June 24, 1824, in Smith County, Tennessee, Nathaniel Macon Burford, graduated from Irving College and the law school at Lebanon, Tennessee, before admission to the bar in 1845. Although he hoped to serve in the Mexican-American War, by the time he reached Knoxville, the state's quota for soldiers had been filled. (At that time, in wartime each state was expected to provide a certain number of soldiers based on the size of its population.) Burford arrived in Jefferson, Texas, in January 1847 and became the district court's deputy clerk. Unhappy with his career opportunities there, he moved to Dallas in October 1848 armed with nothing but five dollars and letters of recommendation.

He quickly formed a law partnership with John H. Reagan, who would serve as a state senator and the postmaster of the Confederacy, among other offices. In 1850 and 1852, Burford won election as district attorney and drafted the Dallas town charter. By 1856, he was named judge of the new Sixteenth Judicial District. After a fire destroyed much of Dallas in 1860, Burford joined a hastily assembled Committee of Vigilance that authorized the torture of numerous slaves suspected of committing arson as part of a planned revolt. The committee ultimately decided to blame the fire on three slaves, who were promptly executed.

Burford left the bench at the outbreak of the Civil War in order to enlist as a private in the First Texas Artillery. He quickly rose to the rank of colonel. Believing he did not possess the skills to lead troops in combat, however, he resigned the army in 1864 and returned to Dallas.

After the Confederacy's defeat in the Civil War, Dallas voters in 1866 returned him again to the House of Representatives. During this 11th Session of the Legislature, House members elected Burford speaker. Under his leadership, the Legislature failed to ratify the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution that abolished slavery, and the 14th Amendment that declared that one's previous condition of servitude would not abridge that individual's citizenship rights. Such stands infuriated Northern voters impatient with secessionists following the Civil War.

So-called Radical Republicans won control of the Congress in federal elections that year and made acceptance of the amendments, rejection of the Confederate war debt, and the writing of new state constitutions providing voting rights to African American men the condition for re-admittance to the Union. The Union Army was empowered to remove anyone from public office in the former Confederate states who obstructed these reforms. An unrepentant secessionist, Burford was removed from office by Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, head of the Union Army occupation forces, as an "impediment to Reconstruction."

In 1868 Burford called for organization of a Conservative party in Dallas County that would oppose the supposed reign of "Negro supremacy" that controlled Texas during Reconstruction. (Contrary to Burford's rhetoric, not a single African American held statewide office in this period.) Burford also participated in a committee of Dallas citizens that persuaded the Houston and Texas Central Railroad to reroute its planned path so the line would pass through Dallas. The railroad company agreed and the arrival of the railroad resulted in Dallas' population boom in the late nineteenth century.

Elected presiding justice of Dallas County in April 1875 and judge of the Eleventh District in February 1876, Burford resigned in April 1877 due to bad health. He was appointed United States commissioner in 1879, serving for the next two years. Burford died in Dallas on May 10, 1898.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Burford

Books:

Biographical souvenir of the state of Texas, containing biographical sketches of the representative public, and many early settled families. Compiled by F.A. Battey & Co. Chicago: F. A. Battey & Company, 1889.

TZ 920 B52S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Copy 1. Use in library only.
TZ 920 B52S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. . Use in library only.
TZZ 920 B52S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 920 B52S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. . Use in library only.

Biographical souvenir of the state of Texas: containing biographical sketches of the representative public, and many early settled families. Compiled by F. A. Battey & Co. Chicago: F. A. Battey, 1889. Microfilm. Woodbridge, Conn., Research Publications, 1975. 1 reel. 35 mm. (Western Americana, reel 54, no. 520)

FILM 25,956 REEL 54 Microforms PCL Level 1 Use in library only.

Biographical souvenir of the state of Texas, containing biographical sketches of the representative public, and many early settled families. Compiled by F. A. Battey & Co. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, c. 1978.

F 385 B563 1978 Center for American History. Use in library only.

History of Dallas County, Texas: from 1837 to 1887. Written by John Henry Brown. Dallas, Tex.: Milligan, Cornett & Farnham, printers, 1887.

F 392 D14 B7 1887 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 976.41 D161B Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
TZ 976.41 D161B Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.41 D161B Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
FILM 25,956 REEL 74 Microforms PCL Level 1

History of Dallas County, Texas, from 1837 to 1887, by John Henry Brown. Dallas County; a record of its pioneers and progress, by John H. Cochran. The two major chronicles of early Dallas County now republished together with a foreword by Sam Acheson. Dallas: Aldredge Book Store, 1966.

TZZ 976.41 D161B 1966 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.41 D161B 1966 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.41 D161B 1966 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

A history of Dallas lawyers, 1840 to 1890. Written by Berry B. Cobb. Dallas: Bar Association of Dallas, 1934.

LAW KF 355 D3 C6 Law Library
TZZ 920 C633H Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T920 C633H Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T920 C633H Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Dallas County; a record of its pioneers and progress, being a supplement to John Henry Brown's History of Dallas County (1887) with correction of some errors contained therein, and much additional information about early settlers and their families. Written by John H. Cochran. Dallas: A. S. Mathis, Service Publishing Co. 1928.

F 392 D14 C6 1928 PCL Stacks
TZ 976.41 D161CO Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.41 D161CO Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.41 D161CO Center for American History. Use in library only.

Sixty years in Texas. Written by George Jackson. Dallas: Wilkinson Printing Co., 1908.

F 391 J34 1908B PCL Stacks
TZ 976.4 J134S 1908 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
T976.4 J134S 1908 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
F 391 J34 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 J34 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 391 J34 1908 HRC DOBIE J. Frank Dobie Library. Use in library only.
FILM 25,956 REEL 285 Microforms PCL Level 1

Memorial and biographical history of Dallas County, Texas ... Containing a history of this important section of the great state of Texas, from the earliest period of its occupancy to the present time ... and biographical mention of many of its pioneers, and also of prominent citizens of to-day. Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1892.

TZZ 976.41 D161M Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.41 D161M Center for American History. Use in library only.

Dallas, an illustrated history. Written by Darwin Payne. Woodland Hills, Calif.: Windson Publications, 1982.

- Q - F 394 D2157 P38 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.

As old as Dallas itself: a history of the lawyers of Dallas, the Dallas Bar Associations, and the city they helped build. Written by Darwin Payne. Dallas: Three Forks Press, c. 1999.

KF 300 P38 1999 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

The fire this time: the battle over racial, regional and religious identities in Dallas, Texas, 1860–1990. Written by Joseph Michael Phillips. Dissertation (Ph.D.)–University of Texas at Austin, 2002.

F 394 D219 A26 2002 Center for American History. Use in library only. DISS 2002 P539 V.1 PCL Stacks 3J-3K
DISS 2002 P539 V.2 PCL Stacks 3J-3K
Internet full text (PDF) from University of Texas Libraries
Internet full text (PDF) from UMI/Dissertation Abstracts International

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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IRA HOBART EVANS
(1844–1922)
20th Speaker
(1870–1871)

Presided over

The 12th Legislature's provisional session, February 8 to February 24, 1870; the 12th Legislature's called session, April 26 to August 15, 1870; and part of the 12th Legislature's called session, January 10 to May 10, 1871.

Born in Piermont, New Hampshire, on April 11, 1844, Evans enlisted in the Vermont Volunteer Infantry in July 1862 to fight for the Union in the Civil War and reached the rank of brevet major by March 1865. Following Confederate General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Virginia the next month, Evans was dispatched to Texas to serve in Maj. Gen. Philip Henry Sheridan's occupation force.

Receiving his discharge in 1867, he established residence just north of Corpus Christi and started raising livestock, but his business went under because of a partner's dishonesty. Evans began his brief career with the Freedmen's Bureau, established by the United States Congress to assist former slaves adjusting to a new life of freedom. He was assigned to the Bureau's office in Wharton but resigned on January 31, 1868, angered by what he described as the incompetence of his superiors. He then worked for the Internal Revenue Service, but entered politics the following year.

The Republican Party, supported by freedman, former Democrats who had opposed secession, and new residents of the state who had arrived from the North after the Civil War, had already split into two factions by the late 1860s, labeled "Radical" and "Conservative." The so-called Radicals supported black civil rights more enthusiastically than the racial conservatives in the party. Radicals also backed invalidating all actions taken by the Texas government during the Civil War, including the incurring of debts. Conservatives generally favored railroad and manufacturing companies they saw as key to the state's economic future. As a result, they favored the recognition of state and local government actions taken between 1861 and 1868 that had not directly been in support of the Confederate war effort. A. J. Hamilton emerged as leader of the Conservatives and Edmund Davis headed the Radical faction. The ballot in the 1869 elections listed candidates as Radicals or Conservatives.

At the urging of Davis, the Radical candidate for governor, Evans successfully ran for a seat in the Texas House, representing the Western District of Texas. It was a good election for the Radicals. Hamilton received endorsements from leading Democrats, but this backfired, alienating some Conservative Republicans who moved into the Radical camp. Democrats in large numbers boycotted the election. With few Democrats voting, Radical candidates won most of the offices and took control of the state House and Senate. House members elected Evans speaker as the Legislature convened in 1870, making the New Hampshire native at age twenty-five the youngest person ever to hold that position and the first-ever Republican speaker.

Evans proved an enthusiastic supporter of railroad development in Texas. But he soon ran afoul of his own party in August 1870 when the Republican-dominated Legislature passed a new election law that delayed the next state elections for one year, to 1872. Evans saw the law as a violation of the 1869 Constitution and vigorously fought the bill. Evans won support for his position by all Democrats in both houses and by a faction of Republicans. A Republican Party caucus summoned Hobart and his legislative allies to the party gathering, where they denounced the speaker. The caucus voted to remove Evans from the speakership, although Evans continued his term as a House member. Upon adjournment of the Twelfth Legislature on December 2, 1871, Evans retired from politics.

Evans spent most of his post-speakership career as an executive with railroad companies. He also served as president of Tillotson College, established for African Americans, from 1909 to 1920 and donated $10,000 to the college to teach students construction skills. Evans also donated another $10,000 to build an official residence for the college president. Located in Austin, that institution was later renamed Huston-Tillotson University after its merger with Samuel Huston College. He died in San Diego, California, on April 19, 1922.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Evans

Books:

A history of Texas and Texans, by Frank W. Johnson. Edited and brought up to date by Eugene C. Barker with the assistance of Ernest William Winkler. To which are added historical, statistical and descriptive matter pertaining to the important local divisions of the State, and biographical accounts of the leaders and representative men of the state. Written by Francis White Johnson. Chicago, New York: American Historical Society, 1914.

F 386 J66 V.1 PCL Stacks
F 386 J66 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 386 J66 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 3
F 386 J66 V.2 PCL Stacks
F 386 J66 V.2 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 386 J66 V.3 PCL Stacks
F 386 J66 V.3 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 386 J66 V.4 PCL Stacks
F 386 J66 V.4 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 386 J66 V.5 PCL Stacks
F 386 J66 V.5 PCL Stacks Copy 2
T-K 976.4 J631H V.1 Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
T-K 976.4 J631H V.2 Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
T-K 976.4 J631H V.3 Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
T-K 976.4 J631H V.4 Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
T-K 976.4 J631H V.5 Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 J631H V.1 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 J631H V.2 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 J631H V.3 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 J631H V.4 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 J631H V.5 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.1 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.1 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.1 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.2 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.2 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.2 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.3 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.3 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.3 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.4 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.4 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.5 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.4 J631H V.5 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
LAW F 386 J66 1916 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Reconstruction in Texas. Written by Charles William Ramsdell. New York: Columbia University, 1910.

Law United States Texas 81 R149 - Law Library Rare Books. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
330 C723 NO.95 PCL Stacks Copy 2
330 C723 NO.95-96 PCL Stacks
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks Copy 2
976.406 R149R 1964 PCL Stacks Copy 3 Library Storage - Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks Copy 4
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 3. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 4. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 5. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 6. Use in library only.
REEL 437 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
HRC DOBIE J. Frank Dobie Library. Use in library only.

Who was who in America, Vol. 4. Chicago, Ill.: Marquis-Who's Who, 1896–.

LAW E 176 W64 Law Library Reference. Use in library only.

Documents:

Newcomb, James Pearson, Sr., papers, 1835–1941. Center for American History.

Material related to Ira Evans is included in this collection.

When will the present legislature of Texas cease to have a legal existence? An address to the Republican Party of Texas upon this question. Written by Ira H. Evans. Austin, Tex.: (s.n.), 1871.

TZ 976.409 EV15W Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Speech of Hon. Ira H. Evans (speaker of the House of Representatives of Texas) delivered April 21 ... on the bill "To encourage the speedy construction of a railroad through the state of Texas to the Pacific Ocean." Austin, Tex.: J. G. Tracy, state printer, 1871.

HE 2771 T4 E93 1871 PCL Circulation Desk
TZ 385 EV15S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 385 EV15S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 385 EV15S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

Vertical File: Evans, Ira Hobart (Center for American History)

The file contains a typed manuscript of a biographical sketch of Evans excerpted from Texas and Texans that concludes in 1885 and is slightly more than four pages. The document is undated. Also included are:

  • A six-page copy of the 1909 certificate awarding Evans the Congressional Medal of Honor for his Civil War service. Evans, incidentally, commanded black troops during the Civil War.
  • A June 9, 1933, letter from San Antonio resident W. L. Evans, Ira Evan's son, to J. Evetts Haley describing the disposition of land amounting to more than one million acres in West Texas held by two railroad companies, the I & G. N. and the H. & G. N.
  • A September 24, 1953, clipping from the Austin Statesman describing Evans' life and his Austin residence, which became the Austin Women's Club.
  • A November 13, 1991, clipping from the Austin American-Statesman, "1st Republican speaker to be honored," noting that a state historical marker was to be placed at his former home at 708 San Antonio Street in Austin.

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