Skip to NavSkip to Content

 
The University of Texas at Austin

Projects

Texas House Speakers Oral History Project -
Biographies and Resources - Index -
Guide to 21st through 30th Speakers

Guide to 21st through 30th Speakers

WILLIAM HENRY SINCLAIR
(1838–1897)
21st Speaker
(1871–1873)

Presided over

Part of the 12th Legislature's called session May 10 to May 31, 1871; and the 12th Legislature's adjourned session, September 12 to December 2, 1871.

Born in Jonestown, Michigan, on October 31, 1838, William Henry Sinclair enlisted in the Union Army early in the Civil War, assigned to the infantry as a fife player in 1862. He rose through the ranks quickly, however, fighting in battles at Corinth and Murfreesboro on the Western front. By the end of the war in April 1865, he had achieved the rank of brevet colonel. Part of the Union force occupying the port city of Galveston after the Civil War, Sinclair decided to settle there after leaving the military.

Sinclair aligned himself with the so-called Radical faction of the Republican Party and served for one term in the House of Representatives. This Legislature pursued an aggressive program of reform, which included passage of the state's first compulsory education laws and the first genuine free public school system. The Legislature also chartered Texas A&M University. Nevertheless, Democrats railed at what they called the extravagance of the Republican administration, and the Republicans were doomed to a short reign of power at the state House.

After his one term as a legislator, Sinclair returned to Galveston where he became county clerk and was later appointed postmaster. Founder of several companies, including an ice making firm and a city railway company, Sinclair became president of the Galveston baseball franchise in the Texas League, which he helped create. Sinclair died on January 11, 1897, in Rochester, New York.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Sinclair

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Reconstruction in Texas. Written by Charles William Ramsdell. New York: Columbia University, 1910.

Law United States Texas 81 R149 - Law Library Rare Books. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
330 C723 NO.95 PCL Stacks Copy 2
330 C723 NO.95-96 PCL Stacks
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks Copy 2
976.406 R149R 1964 PCL Stacks Copy 3 Library Storage - Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk
F 391 R18 1970 PCL Stacks Copy 4
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
976.408 R149R 1964 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 1970 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 3. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 4. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 5. Use in library only.
TZ 976.408 R149R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 6. Use in library only.
FILM 25,956 REEL 437 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
F 391 R18 HRC DOBIE J. Frank Dobie Library. Use in library only.

Documents:

Remarks of Hon. William H. Sinclair, speaker of the House of Representatives of the state of Texas, on adjournment of the 12th Legislature, Delivered December 2, 1871. (n.p., 1871).

TZ 976.409 SI62R Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Top


GUY MORRISON BRYAN
(1821–1901)
23rd Speaker
(1874–1876)

Presided over

The 14th Legislature's 1st regular session January 13 to May 4, 1874; and the 14th Legislature's 2nd regular session January 12 to March 15, 1875.

Born at Herculaneum, Jefferson County, Missouri, on January 12, 1821, Guy Morrison Bryan was the nephew of Stephen F. Austin, widely regarded as the "father" of Anglo Texas. The Bryan family moved to Texas in 1831, eventually settling at the Peach Point Plantation in Brazoria County. As a 15-year-old student, Bryan was selected as the courier for the famous William B. Travis letter written at the Alamo that asked for reinforcements. Bryan carried the letter from Bell's Landing to Brazoria and Velasco.

Following the successful Texas Revolution, Bryan enlisted in the Texas Army. After graduating from Kenyon College in Ohio in 1842, Bryan returned to Texas and began studying law until deteriorating eyesight forced him to quit. Nevertheless, he enlisted in a Brazoria volunteer company and served during the 1846–1848 Mexican American War.

In 1847 Bryan began his political career with successful race for the Texas House, where he served from 1847 to 1853. He then spent four years in the Texas Senate, from 1853 to 1857, before his election to the Thirty-fifth Congress in 1858.

His wife persuaded Bryan to resign his Congressional seat, warning him that she was “so fond of the pleasures of social life in Washington that she feared continued residence at the Capital would unfit her to discharge the duties of a good wife,” according to the book Presiding Officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. After his one term in the United States House, Bryan moved to Galveston in 1860 and became a rancher in Galveston and Brazoria counties.

As the Civil War loomed, Bryan became a leader of pro-secession forces in Texas. He led a walkout of the Texas delegation from the 1860 Democratic National Convention in South Carolina. Men like Bryan sought to prevent the presidential nomination of Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas who was deemed insufficiently sympathetic to Southern slave owners. The Southern and Northern wings of the Democratic Party ended up holding different conventions and nominating different candidates. This split ensured the November victory of Republican Abraham Lincoln, who was committed to stopping the spread of slavery in Western territories. Lincoln's victory resulted in the secession of southern states like Texas, thus launching the Civil War.

Bryan requested to serve in the Confederate Army and, in 1863, General Edmund Kirby Smith made him adjutant general. After the war, Bryan lived primarily in Galveston. Bryan re-entered Texas politics and returned to the Texas House with electoral wins in 1873, 1879, and 1887. The Democrats had returned to power in the state House and Bryan was elected to serve as speaker of the Fourteenth Legislature, which convened in 1874. He served an uneventful term and then retired, living for a time in Brazoria County before moved to Austin in 1898, where he died on June 4, 1901.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Bryan

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

Adriance, John, papers, 1832–1903. Center for American History.

Correspondence; financial records; legal documents; estate papers; deeds, grants, and land papers; church records; maps; and newspaper clippings arranged chronologically under subject.

Adriance, a native of Troy, New York, went to Texas in 1835. After participating in the Texas Revolution, he was engaged in the mercantile business. Adriance was involved with the promotion of railroads and canals, and he was a deputy for the Commissary Department and a county commissioner during the Civil War. This collection contains material related to Guy Morrison Bryan.

Bryan, Guy Morrison, papers, 1838–1901.

The papers include correspondence, autobiographical narrative, military orders, scrapbooks, speeches, historical literary productions, and legal papers arranged chronologically by subject. The collection concerns the career of Bryan, nephew of Stephen F. Austin. It deals with his education; his friendship with Rutherford B. Hayes; his service as state legislator and United States congressman; his activities during the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, and the Civil War as well as his personal and family life. Bryan's correspondence with Rutherford B. Hayes and with Moses Austin Bryan is available in typed transcript.

Bryan, Lewis Randolph, Sr., papers, 1803–1985.

Bryan, son of Moses Austin and Cora Lewis Bryan, was related to Guy Bryan. He was instrumental in starting the Sons of the Republic of Texas and served as president of the Texas Bar Association in 1902 and the Harris County Bar Association in 1911. He also helped found the Harris County Law Library Association. Some materials in the collection pertain to Guy M. Bryan.

Bryan, Moses Austin, papers 1824–1926.

Correspondence, legal documents, memorandum and daybooks, land papers and maps, business papers, and newspaper clippings arranged chronologically under subject. Summary: Papers of Bryan (1817–1895), soldier, postmaster, and county commissioner, relate to his activities as secretary to his uncle Stephen F. Austin, secretary of the Texas legation to the United States in 1839, major in the Civil War, and organizer and secretary of the Texas Veteran Association. Includes some materials related to Guy Morrison Bryan.

Letter from Albert H. Campbell to Hon. Guy M. Bryan of Texas, in relation to the Pacific railroad. Washington: 1858.

FILM 25,956 REEL 90 Microforms PCL Level 1

Ney, Elisabet, papers, 1865–1958.

Collection of the artist's papers includes materials related to Guy Morrison Bryan.

James Franklin Perry and Stephen Samuel Perry papers, 1786–1865, Brazoria County, Texas Frederick, Md.: University Publications of America, c1987.

Records of antebellum southern plantations from the Revolution through the Civil War. Series G, Selections from the Barker Texas History Center, University of Texas at Austin; pt. 1, Texas and Louisiana collections, reels 12–31.

FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 12 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 12 Microforms PCL Level 1 Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 13 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 13 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 14 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 14 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 15 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 15 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 16 Center for American History. Use in library only. FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 16 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 17 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 17 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 18 Center for American History. Use in library only. FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 18 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 19 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 19 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 20 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 20 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 21 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 21 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 22 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 22 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 23 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 23 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 24 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 24 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 25 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 25 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 26 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 26 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 27 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 27 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 28 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 28 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 29 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 29 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 30 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 30 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 31 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 31 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.

James Perry Bryan papers, reel 31, pos. 2 included in this collection.

Collection documents the Anglo-American settlement and the transportation of the slave economy to the Brazos region of Texas. Also has material related to Guy Morrison Bryan.

FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 31 Center for American History. Use in library only.
FILM 18,335 SER.G PT.1 REEL 31 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.

Speech of Guy M. Bryan, member for Brazoria: on a joint resolution for the relief of the infant daughter of Susannah and Almiram Dickinson. Texas: s.n., 1849?.

- Q - F 390 D52 B743 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection

Speech on the Santa Fe question; delivered in the House of Representatives, August 27 and 28, 1850. Written by Guy M. Bryan. Austin: Southwestern American Office, 1850.

TZ 976.407 B84S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection

Speech of Hon. Guy M. Bryan, of Texas, on the impeachment of Judge Watrous: delivered in the House of Representatives, December 14, 1858. Washington: Office of the Congressional Globe, 1858.

LAW UNITED STATES TEXAS 54 W329B Law Library Rare Books. Use in library only.
JK 1595 W3 B792 Center for American History
JK 1595 W3 B792 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection
TZ 347.97 W329YBR Center for American History TXC-Z Collection
TZ 347.97 W329YBR Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Copy 2
973.66 M681 PCL Circulation Desk

Proceedings of the convention of Texian Veterans: held at Houston, May 13th, 14th and 15th, 1873: together with a list of veterans now living: also, the speech of Hon. Guy M. Bryan, delivered on the occasion. Galveston: News Steam Book and Job office, 1873.

F 390 C7292 1873 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Inducements for the annexation of Texas to the United States, and the pledges made by that government to Texas, fully shown by letters from Cols. Guy M. Bryan and Ashbel Smith. Galveston, Tex.: The "News" steam book & job office, 1876.

TZ 976.407 B84I Center for American History TXC-Z Collection
TZZ 976.407 B84I Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Copy 1.
TZZ 976.407 B84I Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Copy 2.

Account of the removal of the remains of Stephen F. Austin from Peach Point Cemetery in Brazoria County, Texas to State Cemetery, Austin, Texas, October 18 to 20, 1910. Written by Guy M. Bryan. Houston: Gray, Dillaye & Co., 1911.

TZZ 976.403 AU77B Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection
T976.403 AU77B Center for American History

Thesis:

Life and services of Guy M. Bryan. Written by Fannie Baker Sholars. Austin: 1930. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Texas.

TZ 976.407 B84BS Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Top


THOMAS REUBEN BONNER
(1838–1891)
24th Speaker
(1876–1879)

Presided over

The 15th Legislature's regular session, April 18 to August 21, 1876.

Born in Holmes County, Mississippi, on September 11, 1838, Thomas Reuben Bonner moved with his family to Rusk, Texas, by 1850. By age 12 he began a program of self-education through reading and directed study even as he worked as an apprentice printer for the Cherokee Sentinel newspaper. Taking charge of his father's farm at age 16, Bonner enlisted in the Confederate army in 1862, rising eventually to the rank of colonel. Bonner returned to his farm after the war.

Bonner won his first term in the Texas House in 1866, representing Cherokee County. He became famous for a heartfelt speech commending former Confederate President Jefferson Davis' services to the South delivered shortly after Davis' release from prison. In that 11th legislative session, Bonner authored the bill that chartered the Houston and Great Northern Railroad Company, of which he was director. He studied law and won admission to the bar and practiced law in Rusk from 1867 until 1872 when he moved to Tyler and became a prosperous banker.

In 1876 the state of Texas approved its fifth constitution, written to overturn Reconstruction and to hamper the powers of any future reform-oriented governors or legislatures. The 1876 Legislature was the first to assemble under this new charter. That year, Bonner again won election to the Texas House, this time from Smith County. Emerging as House speaker that session, he was nevertheless defeated in his House re-election bid.

Moving back to Tyler, Bonner became the director of other railroad companies, including the Texas and St. Louis Railroad Company and the Kansas and Gulf Short Line Railroad Company. He died in 1891.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Bonner

Books:

Texans in gray: a regimental history of the Eighteenth Texas Infantry, Walker's Texas Division in the Civil War: from the firsthand accounts by John C. Porter, Thos. G. (i.e. R.) Bonner, and William B. Ochiltree of the Eighteenth Texas Infantry. Edited by James Henry Davis. Tulsa: Heritage Oak Press, c1999.

E 580.5 18TH T49 1999 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Texans who wore the gray, by Sid S. Johnson, Capt. 3rd Texas Cavalry, Ross Brigade, C.S.A., and Brigadier General Texas Brigade, Forrest's Cavalry, U.C.V. v. 1. Written by Sidney Smith Johnson. (Tyler Tex.: c.1907)

E 580 J69 PCL Stacks
E 580 J69 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 580 J69 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
E 580 J69 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
E 580 J69 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
FILM 25,956 REEL 508 Microforms PCL Level 1

The encyclopedia of the new West, containing fully authenticated information of the agricultural, mercantile, commercial, manufacturing, mining and grazing industries, and representing the character, development, resources and present condition of Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, New Mexico and Indian Territory. Also, biographical sketches of their representative men and women. Edited by William S. Speer and John Henry Brown. Marshall, Tex.: The United States Biographical Publishing Company, 1881.

F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 S74 Center for American History Vandale Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 S74 1881 Center for American History. Use in library only.
- Q - TZ 920.073 SP32E Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 920.073 SP32E Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

The encyclopedia of the new West: containing fully authenticated information of the agricultural, mercantile, commercial, manufacturing, mining and grazing industries, and representing the character, development, resources and present condition of Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, New Mexico and Indian Territory: also biographical sketches of their representative men and women. Edited by William S. Speer, managing editor; John Henry Brown, revising editor. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, c1978. "Reproduced from an 1881 edition in the Fort Worth Public Library, Fort Worth, Texas." Includes facsim. reproduction of t.p. of original 1881 ed., published by United States Biographical Pub. Co., Marshall, Tex.

F 385 S74 1978 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


JOHN H. COCHRAN
(1838–1928)
25th and 32nd Speaker
(1879–1881 and 1893–1895)

Presided over

The 16th Legislature's regular session, January 14 to April 24, 1879; and the 16th Legislature's 1st called session, June 10 to July 9, 1879.

The 18th Legislature's regular session, January 9 to April 13, 1883; and the 18th Legislature's called session, January 6 to February 6, 1884.

Born on June 28, 1838, in Columbia, Tennessee, John Hughes Cochran settled with his family in Dallas County in 1843. His father, William Cochran, served as the first Dallas County Clerk. In 1859, John Cochran graduated from McKenzie College in Red River County, teaching classes while a student in order to pay for his tuition. Becoming a commander of a Texas Rangers company in 1860, Cochran enlisted in the Sixth Texas Cavalry at the onset of the Civil War but was forced to retire two years later due to illness.

He returned to Dallas County and quickly won election as tax assessor and collector, leaving office in 1866, when he decided to step down. He re-entered politics in 1873, however, when he won a seat in the Texas House as a Democrat. Cochran served as chair of the House Committee on Revenue and Taxation. He was re-elected twice and became speaker in 1879.

After a hiatus, he returned to the Texas House for the Twenty-second and Twenty-third Legislatures, winning election as speaker again in 1885. President Grover Cleveland, the first Democrat elected to the White House since before the Civil War, appointed Cochran postmaster of Dallas in 1887. Cochran remained in this position until Cleveland lost his bid for re-election and left office in 1889.

Cochran moved to Nolan County in 1894, where he farmed and raised livestock. He won the office of county judge in 1896 and was twice reelected. Afterward, he largely retired from politics, although he served as an alternate delegate to the Democratic National Convention in Baltimore that nominated Woodrow Wilson for president in 1912. In 1925 he was commissioned by the Dallas Historical Society to write Dallas County: A Record of its Pioneers and Progress, which was completed in the spring of 1928 when the former speaker was 90. Cochran died in October 20, 1928.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Cochran

Books:

Biographical encyclopedia of Texas. New York: Southern Publishing Company, 1880.

- Q - F 385 B55 1880 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 B55 1880 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 B55 1880 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 B55 1880 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - F 385 B55 1880 PHOTOCOPY Center for American History. Use in library only.

Biographical encyclopedia of Texas. LaPorte, Tex.: San Jacinto Museum of History Association, 1986. Excerpted from the Biographical encyclopedia of Texas, originally New York: Southern Publishing Co., 1880.

- Q - F 389 A937 1986 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
- Q - F 389 A937 1986 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

Dallas County: A record of its pioneers and progress, being a supplement to John Henry Brown's History of Dallas County (1887), with some corrections of some errors contained therein, and much additional information about early settlers and their families. Written by John H. Cochran. Dallas: A.S. Mathis, Service Publishing Co., 1928.

F 392 D14 C6 1928 PCL Stacks
TZ 976.41 D161CO Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.41 D161CO Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.41 D161CO Center for American History. Use in library only.

Dallas: the making of a modern city. Written by Patricia Evridge Hill. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1996.

F 394 D2157 H35 1996 PCL Stacks
F 394 D2157 H35 1996 PCL Stacks
F 394 D2157 H35 1996 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 394 D2157 H35 1996 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
Internet Access limited to users with UT Austin EID

Dallas, an illustrated history. Written by Darwin Payne. Woodland Hills, Calif.: Windson Publications, 1982.

- Q - F 394 D2157 P38 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.

As old as Dallas itself: a history of the lawyers of Dallas, the Dallas Bar Associations, and the city they helped build. Written by Darwin Payne. Dallas: Three Forks Press, c1999.

KF 300 P38 1999 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

The fire this time: the battle over racial, regional and religious identities in Dallas, Texas, 1860–1990. Written by Joseph Michael Phillips. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 2002.

F 394 D219 A26 2002 Center for American History. Use in library only.
DISS 2002 P539 V.1 PCL Stacks 3J–3K
DISS 2002 P539 V.2 PCL Stacks 3J–3K
Internet full text
Full text (PDF) from UMI/Dissertation Abstracts International

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Cochran, John H. (Center for American History)

Contains a column by Sam Acheson in the Dallas Morning News from April 7, 1955, that describes Cochran's history, Dallas County: A Record of Its Pioneers and Progress. Acheson notes Cochran's published criticisms of Reconstruction in Dallas County and of state laws and city council actions in the latter nineteenth century.

Top


GEORGE R. REEVES
(1826–1882)
26th Speaker
(1881–1882)

Presided over

The 17th Legislature's regular session, January 11 to April 1, 1881; and the 17th Legislature's 1st called session, April 6 to May 5, 1882.

Born in Hickman County, Tennessee, on January 3, 1826, George R. Reeves moved with his parents to Crawford County, Arkansas eight years later. Working on a farm as a youth, Reeves followed relatives to Texas in 1846, settling in Grayson County near Sherman. There, voters elected him tax collector, an office he held from 1848 to 1850. For the next four years, 1850 to 1854, he served as Grayson County sheriff.

Continuing his political ascent, Reeves represented Grayson County in the Texas House from 1855 until 1859 when his career was interrupted by the Civil War. Reeves enlisted in the Confederate Army as a captain in 1861, where he engaged in battles at Murfreesboro and Corinth. Earning promotion for his bravery during the Battle of Chattanooga, he was named a regiment commander.

Following the Civil War, Reeves returned to Grayson County and expanded his farm holdings, occasionally returning to state politics. He won a seat in the Texas House in 1866 and 1873 before moving to Pottsboro, where he was again elected state representative in 1879 and 1881. In his last term, he was chosen speaker and presided over the session that in 1881 drafted legislation establishing the University of Texas at Austin. He became the first and, as of 2007, the only speaker to die in office on September 5, 1882.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Reeves

Books:

Glimpses of Grayson County, from the early days. Sherman, Tex.: T. Bomar & Sons, Publishers, 1894.

TZ 976.41 G795B Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZ 976.41 G795B Photocopy Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 976.41 G795B Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

Resolutions to the memory of Hon. Geo. R. Reeves. Proceedings in House of Representatives, eighteenth legislature, Tuesday, January 30, 1883, 7:30 p.m. Austin, E.W. Swindells, State Printer, 1883.

TZ 976.409 R259BT Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
T976.409 R259BT Center for American History. Use in library only.

Top


CHARLES REESE GIBSON
(1842–1925)
27th Speaker
(1883–1885)

Presided over

The 18th Legislature's regular session, January 9 to April 13, 1883; and the 18th Legislature's 1st called session, January to February 6, 1884.

Born on June 21, 1842, in Oakville, Lawrence County, Alabama, Charles Reese "Uncle Charlie" Gibson, was attending law school at Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee at the start of the Civil War when he enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private in the Sixteenth Alabama Infantry. Gibson rose to the rank of sergeant major by the time the war ended in April of 1865. Shortly following the war Gibson, obtained a law license in Moulton, Alabama.

Gibson settled in Waxahachie, Texas, in 1867 at the age of 25 and served as district and county clerk in Ellis County from 1869 to 1873. By 1874, he began publishing a newspaper for the first time, the Ellis County News, headquartered in Waxahachie. Selling the News shortly thereafter, Gibson established the Waxahachie Enterprise, which began publication in January 1876. A return to politics interrupted his career as a publisher, however, and Gibson sold the Enterprise.

He first won election to the Texas House of Representatives representing Ellis County in 1878 as a Democrat. He won re-election to the House in 1880 and 1882, earning the speakership in that last term. Much of his speakership centered on the controversy involving the fencing of corporate-owned farms in West Texas. Many of these corporate farms completely enclosed farms owned by smaller landowners, cutting off their access to water during the drought-stricken early 1880s. During Gibson's speakership, the Legislature forged a compromise bill that disallowed some types of obstructive fencing by large ranchers but protected the corporate owners by outlawing the "malicious" cutting of fences.

While still in the Legislature, Gibson began editing the Waxahachie Mirror in 1881 and returned to the city newspaper staff in 1900 to write morning "squibs" for the Waxahachie Daily Light and the Weekly Enterprise, a job that earned him a reputation as a clever and provocative wordsmith. Long active in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, he established lodges in fifteen Texas towns. Gibson died at his home in Waxahachie on October 22, 1925, at the age of 83.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Gibson

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


LAFAYETTE LUMPKIN FOSTER
(1851–1901)
28th Speaker
(1885–1887)

Presided over

The 19th Legislature's regular session, January 13 to March 31, 1885.

Born on November 27, 1851, in Cumming, Forsyth County, Georgia, Lafayette Lumpkin Foster immigrated to Texas in 1869 at the age of eighteen, settling in Limestone County. Arriving poor, he worked as a bricklayer and a cotton-picker until he eventually earned enough money to enroll at Waco University. Moving back to Limestone County in 1873 to the town of Groesbeck, Foster began a newspaper career, publishing the Limestone New Era in 1876.

His newspaper career allowed the working class Foster to achieve local prominence. He left that field, however, as he became deeply involved in state politics. Elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1880, he rose to the speakership in his third term at the age of 33, becoming at that point the second youngest man ever elected to that office.

At the close of his speakership, Governor Lawrence S. Ross appointed Foster Texas Commissioner of Insurance, Statistics, and History. He was later named Commissioner of Agriculture. Foster held that position as the Democratic Party faced a challenge from the Populist Movement, which charged that farmers and workers suffered overcharging and exploitation from large, unscrupulous companies in the banking, railroad, and insurance industries. This prompted a period of reform in state government. As insurance commissioner, Foster worked with Attorney General James S. Hogg to shut down insurance companies not complying with state law. On May 4, 1891, Governor Hogg appointed Foster to the state's first Railroad Commission.

Foster later resigned, however, to serve as vice president and general manager of the Velasco Terminal Railway and became president of Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College (now Texas A&M University) in 1898. He held that position until he died of pneumonia on December 2, 1901. The college honored him by burying Foster on the grounds of the Texas A&M campus.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Foster

Books:

Personnel of the Texas State government, with sketches of distinguished Texans, embracing the executive and staff, heads of the departments, United States senators and representatives, members of the XXth Legislature. Compiled and published by L. E. Daniell. Austin: Press of the City Printing Company, 1887.

TZ 920 D227 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
TZ 920 D227 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
TZ 920 D227P 1887 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Use in library only.
T920 D227P 1887 Center for American History Use in library only.
TZ 920 D227P Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Use in library only.
TZ 920 D227P 1889 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Use in library only.
T920 D227P 1889 Center for American History Use in library only.
920 D227P PCL Stacks Copy 1 Library Storage - Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


GEORGE CASSETY PENDLETON
(1845–1913)
29th Speaker
(1887–1889)

Presided over

The 20th Legislature's regular session, January 11 to April 4, 1887; and the 20th Legislature's 1st called session, April 16 to May 15, 1888.

Born in Warren County, Tennessee, near the town of Viola, on April 23, 1845, George Cassety Pendleton moved with his family to Ellis County, Texas in 1857. He enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private at the start of the Civil War and saw combat action with the Nineteenth Texas Cavalry. After the war, he returned to Texas and attempted to resume his studies, enrolling in the Waxahachie Academy, but poor health forced him to drop out. Pendleton worked for a time as a traveling salesman for a Dallas implement company and remained there for ten years.

Following marriage to Helen Embree of Belton, Texas, in 1870, Pendleton eventually resettled in Bell County where he became a farmer. He became active in the Grange, a farm activist group that, among other proposals, called for establishment of the Texas Railroad Commission. Pendleton then moved to Temple in 1882 and began working with his brother-in-law William E. Hill and A. M. Monteitha's land abstract and title firm.

Active in Democratic Party politics, Pendleton attended every state Democratic Party convention between 1876 and 1910. He won election representing Bell County as a member of the Texas House of Representatives in 1882 and also filled a number of positions within the Democratic Party, including serving as chairman pro tem of the state conventions of 1887 and 1888.

By 1887 he won election as speaker of the House and during that term he campaigned heavily against a Prohibition amendment to the state Constitution. Over Pendleton's objections, the Legislature voted to place Prohibition before Texas voters, who rejected the amendment by nearly a 100,000-vote margin.

In 1890 the party nominated Pendleton for lieutenant governor, an office he filled until 1893. On the political fast track, Pendleton turned his attention to Washington and in 1892 he won a seat in Congress from the Seventh District, which included Bell, Falls, McLennan, Freestone, Limestone, Milam, Brazos, and Robertson counties. He served two terms in the U.S. House. He also won election as a delegate to the 1896 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the convocation that nominated William Jennings Bryan for president and heard the Nebraskan's famous "Cross of Gold" speech.

Following his Congressional career, Pendleton returned to Temple. He became a banker and studied law, earning admission to the bar in 1900. After Woodrow Wilson won the White House in 1912, the new administration planned to appoint Pendleton postmaster of Temple, but before the announcement could be made the 68-year-old political veteran suffered a stroke and died on January 19, 1913.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Pendleton

Books:

Biographical directory of the United States Congress, 1774–1989: the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, and the Congress of the United States, from the First through the One Hundredth Congresses, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1989, inclusive. Bicentennial ed. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1989.

Internet access limited to Law School affiliations
View full text of publication in Law Library

Biographical directory of the American Congress, 1774–1996: the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, and the Congress of the United States, from the First through the 104th Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1997. Edited by Joel D. Treese. Alexandria, Va.: CQ Staff Directories, Inc., c1997.

Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID

Biographical directory of the American Congress. 1774–1927. The Continental congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788 and the Congress of the United States from the First to the Sixty-ninth Congress, March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1927, inclusive. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1928.

- Q - 923.273 UN3 1928 PCL Stacks

Biographical directory of the American Congress, 1774–1961: the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788 and the Congress of the United States, from the First to the Eighty-sixth Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1961, inclusive. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Govt. Printing Office, 1961.

JK 1010 A5 1961 Public Affairs Library
328.73 UN3B PCL Stacks Library Storage-Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk)
328.73 UN3B PCL Stacks Copy 2 Library Storage-Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk
- Q - 923.273 UN3 1961 PCL Stacks
- Q - 923.273 UN3 1961 PCL Stacks Copy 2
- Q - 923.273 UN3 1961 PCL Stacks Copy 3 Library Storage-Request Online or ask at Circulation Desk

Biographical directory of the American Congress, 1774-1996: the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, and the Congress of the United States, from the First through the 104th Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1997. Edited by Joel D. Treese. Alexandria, Va.: CQ Staff Directories, Inc., c. 1997.

JK 1010 A5 1997 PCL Reference Dept. Use in library only.
JK 1010 A5 1997 Public Affairs Library Reference. Use in library only.

Biographical directory of the American Congress, 1774–1971, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, and the Congress of the United States, from the First through the Ninety-first Congress, March 4, 1789, to January 3, 1971, inclusive. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971.

JK 1010 A5 1971 PCL Stacks
JK 1010 A5 1971 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 1010 A5 1971 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 1010 A5 1971 Public Affairs Library
JK 1010 A5 1971 PCL Stacks. Use in library only.

Biographical directory of the American Congress, 1774–1949, the Continental Congress, September 5, 1774, to October 21, 1788, and the Congress of the United States from the First to the Eightieth Congress, March 4, 1789 to January 3, 1949, inclusive. Compiled by James L. Harrison, compiler. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950.

- Q - JK 1010 A54 Humanities Research Center. Use in library only.
JK 1010 A54 PCL Stacks
JK 1010 A54 PCL Stacks Copy 2

Indian wars and pioneers of Texas. Written by John Brown. Austin: L. E. Daniell, 189–. Microfilm. New Haven, Conn.: Research Publications, 1975.–1 reel; 35 mm.–(Western Americana: frontier history of the Trans-Mississippi West, 1550–1900; reel 74, no. 751)

FILM 25,956 REEL 74 Microforms PCL Level 1

Indian wars and pioneers of Texas. Written by John Henry Brown. Austin: L.E. Daniel, 189–.

- Q - T-K 976.4002 B813I Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - T-K 976.4002 B813I 189– Center for American History TXC-K Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZ 976.4002 B813I Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZ 976.4002 B813I Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 976.4002 B813I Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 1. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 976.4002 B813I Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 976.4002 B813I 189– Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
HRC STARK SS 82 HRC STK Stark Collection USE IN LIBRARY ONLY.

Indian wars and pioneers of Texas. By John Henry Brown. Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, c1978. "This volume was reproduced from an 1880 edition in the Fort Worth Public Library, Fort Worth, Texas."

F 385 B877 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Indian wars and pioneers of Texas. Written by John Henry Brown. Austin: State House Press, 1988.

F 385 B87 1988 PCL Reference Dept. Use in library only.
F 385 B87 1988 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Platforms of political parties in Texas. Edited by Ernest William Winkler. Austin: The University of Texas, 1916.

JK 2295 T4 W5 PCL Stacks
TZ 329 W729P Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 329 W729P Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T329 W729P Center for American History. Use in library only.
T329 W729P Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
T329 W729P Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
329 W729P PCL Stacks IN COLLECTIONS DEPOSIT LIB - ASK AT CIRCULATION DESK
LAW JK 2295 T4 W5 - Law Library

Documents:

Speech delivered by Hon. George C. Pendleton at the Confederate re-union: August 6, 1908. Belton, Tex.: Journal-Reporter, 1908.

TZ 973.704 P374S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 973.704 P374S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
973.794 P374S PCL Stacks

Top


FRANK P. ALEXANDER
(1853–?)
30th Speaker
(1889–1891)

Presided over

The 21st Legislature's regular session, January 6 to April 6, 1889.

Few details are known about the life of Frank P. Alexander. He is thought to have been born in Pickens, South Carolina, on September 1, 1853, although his birth might have come two years later. Apparently trained as a printer in his home state, Alexander moved to Jefferson in the East Texas county of Marion at about age 17.

Like many speakers of his day, Alexander first achieved fame as a journalist, forming a partnership with an editor and owner of the Daily Jefferson Democrat. He worked at the Democrat for three years and, after a stint at a newspaper in Fort Worth, settled in Greenville in Hunt County in East Texas at about 1875. There, he edited the Greenville Enterprise. In 1879, Foster founded the Greenville Herald which he operated until 1884, when he sold the newspaper and retired from journalism and worked in the insurance industry.

A reform Democrat perhaps influenced by the Populist movement active in Texas in the 1880s and 1890s, Alexander became a delegate to the state Democratic convention in Austin in 1878. After an unsuccessful 1882 campaign for state representative, he won election to the House two years later and would serve three terms, from 1885 to 1889. Once in the House, Alexander served on the Internal Improvements, State Affairs, and Printing committees and won election as chair of the Insurance and Statistics Committee. Alexander's chief interest was curbing monopoly power in the state, and in his first term he proposed a bill that would have created a state railroad commission with the power of setting freight rates. The bill was defeated, but a version creating the Texas Railroad Commission eventually passed in 1891 after Alexander no longer served in the House.

During his speakership in 1889, the House passed several reform measures including an antitrust law that sought to limit the ability of powerful railroad companies to monopolize prices and restrict trade. After a bill passed in Kansas, another hotbed of Populism, the Texas anti-trust legislation was only the second in the country and preceded by a year the more famous federal Sherman Antitrust Act.

Obscurity shrouds Alexander's life following his term as speaker. It is unknown where he lived after leaving the House and scholars have found nothing documenting the place or date of his death.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Alexander

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top