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Texas House Speakers Oral History Project -
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Guide to 31st through 40th Speakers

Guide to the 31st through 40th Speakers

R. T. MILNER
(1851–1923)
31st Speaker
(1891–1893)

Presided over

The 22nd Legislature's regular session, January 13 to April 13, 1891; and the 22nd Legislature's 1st called session, March 14 to April 12, 1892.

Born on June 21, 1851, in Cherokee County, Alabama, Robert Teague Milner moved as a child with his family to Texas, settling seven miles east of Henderson in Rusk County. Milner attended Henderson Male and Female College and taught school for 15 years until 1881, when he purchased the Henderson Times, where he also served as editor for nearly 25 years.

From that perch, he echoed much of the Populist Party sentiment common in East Texas in the last two decades of the nineteenth century. The Grange, the Populists and other groups, concerned by the plight of farmers hurt by post-Civil War deflation, falling commodity prices, and high railroad rates, demanded that the state and federal governments curb the political power of banks and railroad companies. As a journalist, Milner advocated that Texas farmers move away from exclusive reliance on cotton growing and supported railroad workers who went on strike in 1886.

Milner won election to the state House of Representatives in 1887, and was re-elected in 1889 and 1891. He served as chair of the House Education Committee and wrote legislation requiring the teaching of Texas history in the state's public schools. A supporter of reformist Gov. James Stephen Hogg, Milner backed the governor's calls for creation of a state Railroad Commission, long a demand of agriculture activists. Milner held the speaker's gavel when that legislation passed in 1891.

In 1907 Gov. Thomas Mitchell Campbell appointed Milner state commissioner of agriculture, insurance, statistics, and history. Milner authored a bill used by the state Legislature to create the office of Commissioner of Agriculture. Milner became the first agriculture commissioner and organized the department, but he left the next year in order to become president of Texas A&M. Milner reorganized the university, dividing it into separate schools of engineering and agriculture. He resigned in June 1913 and returned to Henderson, where he died on July 30, 1923.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Milner

Books:

East Texas: its topography, soils, timber, agricultural products, people, rainfall, streams, climate, etc. Written by R.T. Milner. Austin, Tex., Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1914.

T630.6 T312B NO.30–48 Center for American History. Use in library only.
T917.64 M636E Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Theses:

The life of Colonel R.T. Milner. Written by Rosalind Langston. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Texas at Austin, 1940.

T1940 L269 PCL Stacks Copy 2
T1940 L269 Request at Periodicals Desk PCL Level 2. Use in library only. Item in library storage facility.

Vertical File: Milner, R. T. (Center for American History)

Contains a July 20, 1941, Dallas Morning News story on the appearance in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly of a biography of Robert Teague Milner written by Rosalind Langston, who received a master's degree from the University of Texas at Austin. The story includes praise of the biography from Judge T. Whitfield Davidson and a brief sketch of Milner's life.

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THOMAS SLATER SMITH
(1856–1901)
33rd Speaker
(1895–1897)

Presided over

The 24th Legislature's regular session, January 8 to April 30, 1895; and the 24th Legislature's 1st called session, October 1 to October 7, 1895.

Born in Cherokee County, Mississippi, on July 6, 1856,Thomas Slater Smith graduated from Emory and Henry College in Washington County, Virginia in 1877. He then enrolled at the University of Virginia, where in 1878 he earned a law degree. Establishing a private law practice in Tupelo, Mississippi, he earned election as mayor before moving in 1884 to Hillsboro, Texas.

In just one year, Smith rose to the position of Hill County Attorney and was elected to the state House of Representatives in 1893 and 1895. While Smith served as speaker in the 1895 regular and special sessions, the House passed the Four Section Settler Act, which allowed settlers to purchase up to four square miles of land from the state at a minimum price of one dollar an acre, with the interest rate set at three percent. The proceeds of the sales went to the state's permanent school fund. Much of the land rested in West Texas and the bill greatly increased that region's population.

Voters elected him state attorney general in 1898 and 1900. While in that office he continued the legal investigation begun by his predecessor Martin McNulty Crane, into the business practice of the Waters-Pierce Oil Company, a subsidiary of Standard Oil. Crane accused Waters-Pierce of violating the state's anti-trust laws.

Smith represented the state when Waters-Pierce appealed an earlier verdict against the company. In 1900, Smith beat back the appeal and Waters-Pierce was ordered to pay a $2 million fine to the state. Waters-Pierce then severed its connection to Standard Oil and reapplied to do business in the state. Asked for his legal opinion on this maneuver, Smith ruled that it was legal. Another round of appeals, however, would continue past Smith's death during his second term. He passed away in Austin on March 15, 1901. Later, a second verdict would be reached against Waters-Pierce.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Smith

Books:

A memorial and biographical history of Johnson and Hill counties, Texas: containing the early history of this important section of the great state of Texas together with glimpses of its future prospects; also biographical mention of many of the pioneers and prominent citizens of the present time, and full-page portraits of some of the most eminent men of this section. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1892.

TZ 976.4 M5192 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 976.4 M5192 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.4 M5192 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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L. TRAVIS DASHIELL
(1869–1924)
34th Speaker
(1897–1899)

Presided over

The 25th Legislature regular session, January 12 to May 21, 1897; and the 25h Legislature's 1st called session, May 22 to June 20, 1897.

Born at Chappell Hill, Texas, on April 30, 1869, L. Travis Dashiell became the first native Texan to hold the office of Texas House Speaker. Growing up in Washington County, he attended the University of Texas at Austin from 1886 to 1890. Dashiell worked for a time at the State Geologic Survey while he studied law. He was admitted to the bar in Centerville in 1891 and named Leon County Attorney in January 1892.

Only eleven months later, he won election to the Texas House of Representatives. He became chair of the House Education Committee in 1894. In 1891 the Legislature passed a law providing for the adoption of uniform textbooks across the state. Elected speaker of the House the next session, Dashiell steered passage of a landmark education bill creating Texas' first state textbook board, which was assigned the task of approving texts for the state.

After his legislative career, Dashiell continued to be active in Democratic Party politics, serving as a William Jennings Bryan delegate to the 1896 Democratic National Convention. He resumed his law practice in Leon County. Voters there elected him district attorney in 1904 and 1906. Gov. Thomas Campbell appointed him secretary of state, an office he filled from January 1907 to February 1908. Then appointed to chair the state tax board, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for the state Railroad Commission in 1908. He died in Jewett on October 21, 1924 of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

University Materials Related to Speaker Dashiell

Books:

Texas State government; a volume of biographical sketches and passing comment. Written by E.H. Loughery. Austin: McLeod & Jackson, Printers, 1897.

TZ 923.2 L929T 1897 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 923.2 L929T 1897 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 923.2 L929T 1897 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Principal corporation laws of the state of Texas. Compiled by L.T. Dashiell. Austin, Tex.: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1907.

T347.1 T312P 1907 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Vertical File: Dashiell, L. T. (Center for American History)

Contains a campaign card for Dashiell's unsuccessful campaign for the Texas Railroad Commission in 1908.

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J. S. SHERRILL
(1853–1931)
35th Speaker
(1899–1901)

Presided over

The 26th Legislature's regular session, January 10 to May 27, 1899; and the 26th Legislature's called session, January 23 to February 21, 1900.

Born in Fannin County in North Texas, on September 15, 1853, J. S. Sherrill grew up on a farm and obtained his education only through private studies. In spite of his lack of formal schooling, he worked as a teacher and occasionally attended Carlton College in Bonham, eventually earning a degree.

In 1878 he won admission to the Texas bar and practiced as an attorney in Fannin County for two years before moving to nearby Greenville. There, he was elected Hunt County Judge at age 25. He held that position for six years but decided to return to private practice.

Sherrill first won election to the Texas House of Representatives in 1892. He did not remain there long, however, because Hunt's County's state senator won a United States House race and left a vacancy. Sherrill won the election to fill that vacancy. He served the four-year term and then left politics for a couple of years. He ran again for the state House in 1898, and the following year rose to the speakership.

The nation and the state had recovered from the series of depressions that wracked the country from the 1870s to the mid-1890s. With more revenues available, the state Legislature during Sherrill's tenure as speaker established a college in Sherrill's home region of North Texas in Denton, an institution that became the University of North Texas.

After leaving the speakership, Sherrill again practiced as a private attorney. He moved south and worked for years as a lawyer for the Houston Land Bank and died in that city on February 16, 1931.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Sherrill

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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ROBERT E. PRINCE
(1859–1925)
35th Speaker
(1901–1903)

Presided over

The 27th Legislature's regular session, January 8 to April 9, 1901; the 27th Legislature's first called session, August 6 to September 4, 1901; and the 27th Legislature's 2nd called session, September 5 to October 1, 1901.

Born October 1, 1859, in Coahoma County, Mississippi, Robert E. Prince grew up in Tennessee, where he earned a degree from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. He later received his law degree from Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee.

By 1882, Prince settled in the Corsicana in the North Central Texas county of Navarro. Prince would call Corsicana home the remainder of his life.

Prince had a private law practice and first showed an interest in politics when he served as a delegate to the 1892 Democratic National Convention. Six years later, he was elected to the 26th Legislature as a member of the House of Representatives. Prince quickly became a dominant member of the House, serving on nine committees and chairing one. He also authored the state's first-ever bill regulating the drilling of oil and gas wells.

After re-election to the House in 1900, Prince captured the speakership and helped guide to passage a law allowing the state to commence reconstruction of the heavily damaged city of Galveston, devastated by a hurricane in 1901. Unfortunately, Prince's term also saw the Legislature amend the state Constitution to create a poll tax, along with other measures aimed at reducing voting by African Americans and poor whites. These groups were seen as the driving force in the radical Populist or People's Party, which was now just a shadow of its former self.

The revenue from the poll tax was spent to help fund a segregated school system. The United States Supreme Court in the 1960s would rule that poll taxes unconstitutionally violated voting rights and the United States Constitution would be amended to outlaw the practice.

Prince returned to Corsicana after his speakership and would serve on the State Board of Education and became a trustee of the State Orphans' Home based in Corsicana. Prince died on March 23, 1925.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Prince

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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PAT MORRIS NEFF
(1871–1952)
37th Speaker
(1903–1905)

Presided over

The 28th Legislature's regular session, January 13 to April 1, 1903; and the 28th Legislature's 1st called session, April 2 to May 1, 1903.

Born in Coryell County, Texas, on November 26, 1871, Pat Morris Neff graduated with a bachelor's degree from Baylor University, Waco, in 1894. Moving to Magnolia Arkansas to teach for two years, Neff returned to his home state and received a law degree from the University of Texas in 1897. Launching his career as a lawyer in Waco, Neff earned a master's degree from Baylor in 1898.

His political career began only a year later with his successful campaign for a seat in the state House. As a legislator, he became an aggressive promoter of the poll tax and the Terrell Election Laws, which established whites-only Democratic primaries in Texas. These measures made black voting rights in Texas largely a fiction. Neff also became one of the most ardent backers of Prohibition.

Neff represented the Waco area in the House from 1899 to 1905, the last term as speaker. One researcher believes that he may have been the first speaker to live full-time in the speaker residence. At 32, he was the second youngest speaker in state history up to that time, after Ira Hobart Evans.

After his legislative career, Neff returned to Waco and once again practiced law, winning election as county attorney in 1906, an office he held until 1912. As a prosecutor, he won 406 of 422 cases and on two occasions he was offered the post of assistant state attorney general, but he decided to remain in McLennan County. In 1920, however, he filed in the Democratic gubernatorial primary and, without a political headquarters or campaign manager, he challenged former United States Senator Joseph Weldon Bailey.

Neff faced an opponent in Bailey, who had come out against not only Prohibition, but also woman suffrage and most of the Progressive-era reform agenda that dominated Texas politics in the early twentieth century. Neff proved the more aggressive campaigner. Canvassing the state, Neff drove his car about 6,000 miles to make stump speeches and, along the way, made appearances in thirty-seven counties that had never previously been visited by a gubernatorial candidate. Bailey finished first in the primary, but was forced into a runoff with Neff, who emerged as the victor in the second round of voting.

Neff held an ambitious agenda and as governor, he sought reforms in the state education system, health care, the prison system, and taxation while at the same time he wanted to establish a state park system and reduce the number of state agencies. A rocky relationship with the Legislature, however, doomed much of his program, though he was able to improve funding for rural schools, increase state support for vocational education, and create Texas Technological College and Texas State Teachers College.

Many historians, however, criticize his weak response to the Ku Klux Klan, which revived in the early 1920s and began to dominate cities like Houston and Dallas, and started making inroads on controlling the state government. Nevertheless, Neff won re-election as governor in 1922. He completed his second term as governor early in 1925 and served on a number of state boards, including the Texas Education Survey Commission, the Texas Watersheds Association, and the Railroad Commission.

Baylor University named Neff president in 1932. An able administrator, he brought the school out of debt and oversaw a period in which university enrollment leapt from 1,200 to 4,000. Under his leadership, the area of the campus doubled in size, and the university's endowment grew richer.

Neff drew much opposition to his leadership, however, because he was seen as an inflexible disciplinarian and because he invited President Harry Truman, a Baptist, to visit Baylor in order to receive an honorary degree. Truman, a supporter of civil rights for African Americans who was known for drinking and the use of four-letter words, was not well-liked by many Baylor trustees. After the controversy, Neff resigned in 1947 to become president emeritus. He died in Waco on January 20, 1952.

University Holdings Related to Speaker Neff

Books:

Hood, bonnet, and little brown jug: Texas politics, 1921–1928. Written by Norman D. Brown. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, c1984.

F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 3
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 4
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID. Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1973.

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Chief executives of Texas: from Stephen F. Austin to John B. Connally, Jr. Written by Kenneth E. Hendrickson, Jr. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, c1995.

F 385 H39 1995 PCL Stacks
F 385 H39 1995 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 385 H39 1995 Public Affairs Library
LAW F 385 H39 1995 Law Library
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID. Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.

Allan Shivers: the Pied Piper of Texas politics. Written by Sam Kinch and Stuart Long. Austin, Tex., Shoal Creek Publishers (c. 1973).

F 391 S562 K56 1974 PCL Stacks
F 391 S562 K56 1974 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Public Affairs Library

Governors of Texas. Written by Mike Kingston. Dallas: Dallas Morning News, c1984.

F 385 K56 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Governors who have been: and other public men of Texas. By Norman G. Kittrell. Houston: Dealy-Adey-Elgin, 1921.

LAW F 385 K57 1921 Law Library

The battles of peace. Written by Pat M. Neff. Fort Worth, Tex.: Pioneer Publishing Company, 1925.

T808.51 N298B Center for American History. Use in library only.
T808.51 N298B Center for American History. Copy 3. Use in library only.
F 391 N44 HRC DOBIE J. Frank Dobie Library. Use in library only.
808.51 N298B PCL Stacks. Copy 4

A collection of twenty-three addresses by Pat Morris Neff. Waco, Tex.: Philomathesian Literary Society of Baylor University, 19–.

F 391 N4424 1900Z PCL Stacks
TZZ 808.51 N298C Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T808.51 N298C Center for American History. Use in library only.

Constitution of the state of Texas to accompany Magruder's American government. Pat Morris Neff wrote the forward. Dallas: Allyn and Bacon, 1941?

T342.764 T312 1941 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Making Texans: Five-minute declamations. Written by Pat M. Neff. Austin: Gammel's Books Store, 1931?

PS 662 Z9 N44 PCL Stacks
PS 662 Z9 N44 Center for American History. Use in library only.
PS 662 Z9 N44 Center for American History. Copy 2. Use in library only.
PS 662 Z9 N44 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
PS 662 Z9 N44 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
PS 662 Z9 N44 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Guided with a Steady Hand: The Cultural Landscape of a Rural Texas Park. Written by Dan K. Utley and James W. Steely. Waco, Tex.: Baylor University Press, c. 1998.

F 392 C8 U75 1998 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 392 C8 U75 1998 Center for American History TXC-ZZ collection. Use in library only.
F 392 C8 U75 1998 Architecture Library
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID.

The Texas governor. Written by June Rayfield Welch Dallas: G.L.A. Press, c1977.

LAW F 385 W45 1977 Law Library

Theses:

The speaking career of Pat Morris Neff. Written by Lola Matthews Laughlin. Waco, Texas: Baylor University, 1951. (Thesis (M.A.)–Baylor University, 1951.)

PN 4193 P6 L383 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Administration of Pat M. Neff, Governor of Texas, 1921–1925. Written by Emma Morrill Shirley. Waco, Texas, Baylor University, 1938. (Thesis (M.A.)–Baylor University, 1938.) Series: Baylor Bulletin Vol. XLI, No. 4.

TZZ 976.409 N298BS Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T976.409 N298BS Center for American History. Copy 1. Use in library only.
T976.409 N298BS Center for American History. Copy 2. Use in library only.

Documents:

Autograph collection, 1795–1934. Center for American History

Letters, proclamation, promissory note, signed scraps of paper arranged alphabetically by signers. Papers comprise an artificial collection of 20 documents gathered as examples of the autographs of the signers. The majority of autographs are of persons associated with Texas history. Most are original, some photocopies. Includes material on Pat Neff.

Crane, Martin McNulty, papers, 1834–1973. Center for American History

Political, personal, and business correspondence; legal documents; and printed material arranged chronologically by subject. The collection consists of the politically oriented correspondence of Crane, a leading progressive Democrat and one-time Texas attorney general and includes material related to Pat Neff.

Correspondence between W. G. Pryor, Prison Commissioner, and Pat M. Neff, Governor of Texas, concerning the Texas prison system together with a letter to the Texas legislature. Huntsville Tex.?: 1921?

T365 P956C Center for American History. Use in library only.

Speeches delivered by Pat M. Neff, Governor of Texas, discussing certain phases of contemplated legislation. Austin, Texas: Von Boeckmann-Jones, 1923.

F 391 N42 PCL Stacks
T808.51 N298S Center for American History. Use in library only.
T808.51 N298S Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Gov. Neff and his commission on text book changes. By A.M. Ferguson. Sherman, Texas: Ferguson, 1923.

T379.156 F381G Center for American History. Use in library only.

Extracts from address made by Governor Pat M. Neff at Fort Worth, April 24, 1924, in discussing the selection of the forty delegates to represent Texas Democracy at the Democratic National Convention. Austin, Tex.: A.C. Baldwin & Sons, 1924?

F 391 N4398 1924 PCL Stacks
F 391 N4398 1924 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Farewell address of Pat M. Neff, governor of Texas, 1921–1925, Austin, Texas, January 20th, 1925. Austin, Tx.: 1925.

TZZ 353.909 T312 1925 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

An Epoch-making chapel service of Baylor University. Conducted by Pat M. Neff, President. Waco, Tex.: Baylor University, 1933.

T378.764 B1 CN Center for American History. Use in library only.

Vertical Files:

Vertical File (1): (Clippings) Neff, Pat (Center for American History)

This thick folder contains obituaries following Neff's death in 1952 as well as the following:

  • News clippings from the 1923 session of the state Legislature.
  • Articles about the opening of the 1925 legislative session.
  • A January 21, 1925, article from the Austin American reflecting on Neff's return to private life after his service as governor.
  • A December 4, 1927, Austin American article by Hugh Nugent Fitzgerald, "Governors I Have Known," about Pat Neff.
  • The Baylor Bulletin, Volume XLI, No. 4 (December 1938), featuring a reprint of Emma Morrill Shirley's University of Texas at Austin master's thesis, "The Administration of Pat M. Neff, Governor of Texas, 1921–1925."
  • Speeches Delivered by Pat M. Neff, Governor of Texas, Discussing Certain Phases of Contemplated Legislation (Austin: Van Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1923). Includes a speech advocating the calling of a constitutional convention. Other topics include education, highway construction, revision of the tax laws, the state penitentiary system, industrial development and conservation and reclamation.
  • A supplement to the Meridian Tribune featuring "Opening Speech of Pat M. Neff of Waco as a Candidate for Governor of Texas," dated December 6, 1919 (ca.)
  • Numerous newspaper stories on Neff's administration of Baylor.
  • A feature on Neff's retirement as Baylor president from the December, 1947 issue of West Texas Today
  • Numerous obituaries and retrospective articles on Neff and his widow Myrtie.
  • Multiple copies of the Texas Almanac's gubernatorial biography of Neff that ran in the Dallas Morning News on July 2, 1963, and the Houston Post on February 16, 1964.
  • A feature article from the April 9, 1976, Waco Citizen noting that an official Texas Historical Marker would be erected in front of Pat M. Neff Hall on the Baylor campus.
  • A feature story from the April 1, 1978, San Antonio Express-News comparing the expense of modern statewide races with Neff's 1920 gubernatorial race in which Neff had no campaign office, no campaign manager and drove himself across the state, patching his own tires on the way.

Little is mentioned of Neff's speakership in this file.

Vertical File (2): Neff, Pat (Center for American History)

A thick folder that contains numerous newspaper clippings dating from 1921 to 1992, including:

  • A May 1921 obituary of Isabella Neff from the Austin Express.
  • An advertisement for Neff's run for Texas Railroad Commission in 1936.
  • Many clippings relating to Neff's administration of Baylor University, including stories on controversy over President Harry Truman's visit to Baylor in 1947, and his battles with the students and the Baylor Board of Trustees from 1945–1948.
  • Biographical info on Pat Neff, Jr.
  • Obituaries of and retrospectives on Neff.

Very little is mentioned of his speakership in this file as well.

To Be Added in 2007 (Center for American History):

Terrell Blodgett and David Scott. "Legislating: Serving in the Texas House of Representatives, 1899–1905." Unpublished manuscript received at the Center for American History, Austin, Texas, February 11, 2004.

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FRANCIS WILLIAM SEABURY
(1868–1946)
38th Speaker
(1905–1907)

Presided over

The 29th Legislature's regular session, January 10 to April 15, 1905; the 29th Legislature's 1st called session, April 15 to May 14, 1905; and the 29th Legislature's 2nd called session, March 26 to April 3, 1906.

Born in Norfolk, Virginia, on May 10, 1868, Francis William Seabury graduated from the University of Virginia in 1888. He worked for two years as a teacher in Northern Virginia. He immigrated to Texas in 1890, settling in Brownsville where he studied law and, by 1894, he won the post of city attorney. By 1895 he moved to Rio Grande City, where he lived for fourteen years and ran a new private law practice.

Bilingual, Seabury served in the state House of Representatives from 1895 until 1898 and from 1901 until 1907, representing the entire Rio Grande Valley from Cameron to Zapata County. The one interruption in his service came during the 26th Legislature when he served as Starr County attorney.

The issue of banking regulations dominated his speakership from 1905 to 1907. He then left the Legislature to become county attorney again in Starr County from 1907 until 1909. Afterwards, he resumed his private law practice. Seabury became a member of the Board of Texas Legal Examiners from 1911 to 1915. He continued practicing law until 1945. He died in Houston February 6, 1946.

University Materials Related to Speaker Seabury

Books:

Legislative reform. Written by Francis William Seabury, 1903.

TZ 328.3 SE11L Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

Family tree book: (the Seabury papers). By Francis William Seabury; transcribed and edited by Joel Rene Escobar. Edinburg, Tex.: New Santander Press, 1995.

CS 71 S43 1995 Index Benson Latin American Collection
CS 71 S43 1995 Index Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
CS 71 S43 1995 Text Benson Latin American Collection.
CS 71 S43 1995 Text Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.

The State of Texas, et al, plaintiffs in error, v. Alberto Balli, et al., defendants in error. Brief and argument for defendants in error (by) Herbert Davenport (and) F.W. Seabury. Dallas: E. Duncan & Co., 1943?

TZ 333.3 D274S Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 333.3 D274S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Vertical File: Seabury, F. W. (Center for American History)

The file contains two items:

"An Open Letter to Mr. F. W. Seabury" a published broadsheet by Herbert Davenport dated July 19, 1920, accusing Seabury of attempting to build a political machine in Cameron County with his request to be named chair of the county executive committee. Noting that Seabury is fluent in Spanish (which Davenport charges enables Seabury to build a powerful political operation), Davenport claims that "many" of Seabury's "best-paying and most consistent clients are among the most conservative and reactionary of the old Spanish element." Members of Seabury's "clique," Davenport claims, are former Populists and Republicans.

A one-paragraph obituary of Seabury from the February 7, 1946, Austin American.

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THOMAS BELL LOVE
(1870–1948)
39th Speaker
(1907–1909)

Presided over

The 30th Legislature's regular session, January 8 to April 12, 1907; and the 30th Legislature 1st called session, April 12 to May 11, 1907.

Born in Webster County, Missouri, on June 23, 1870, Thomas Bell Love earned a B.S. degree from Drury College in Springfield, Missouri, in 1891. Serving as city attorney of Springfield, Missouri from 1892 to 1894, he also served on the board of managers of the Missouri State Hospital, and became secretary of the Democratic State Central Committee of Missouri from 1896 to 1898. He settled in Dallas in 1899 and immediately entered the political scene there, winning election to the Texas House of Representatives in 1902, 1904, and 1906.

As a member of the House and a dedicated leader of the Progressive Movement, Love guided passage of legislation reforming taxes and the insurance and banking industries in Texas during the 1905 and 1907 sessions. In 1907 his peers elected him speaker. During that busy session, the Legislature passed laws setting a maximum fourteen-hour workday for railway workers, mandating an eight-hour day for telephone operators and railroad telegraphers, establishing new regulations for the insurance and banking industries, instituting pure food regulations, creating an office to aid farmers, and strengthening anti-trust laws.

Following his speakership, Governor Thomas Mitchell Campbell named him commissioner of the just-created Department of Insurance and Banking. Love resigned from the office in 1910 to resume his private law practice in Dallas.

Love remained a political force in Texas, becoming a state leader for the Prohibition movement and an early supporter of New Jersey Governor Woodrow Wilson, who ran for president first in 1912. The victorious Wilson would reward Love with an appointment in 1917 as assistant secretary of the Treasury Department. A fierce opponent of Miriam Ferguson's gubernatorial campaign in 1924, Love also helped lead anti-Klan forces in the KKK-dominated Dallas of the early 1920.

Voters elected Love to the state Senate, where he served from 1927–31. He unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1930. Love had abandoned the Democratic Party during the 1928 presidential election when he publicly supported Republican Herbert Hoover over the Democratic nominee Al Smith, who was against Prohibition. In spite of his long career with the Democratic Party, this came back to haunt in him in the governor's race, and he finished fourth in the primary field. Love died in Dallas on September 17, 1948.

University Materials Related to Speaker Love

Books:

Hood, bonnet, and little brown jug: Texas politics, 1921–1928. Written by Norman D. Brown. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, c1984.

F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 3
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 4
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID.Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1973

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only. JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

Answer of a majority of the Texas delegation to the brief of Thos. B. Love concerning the recommendation of the State Democratic Convention of Judge Wm. Poindexter for national committeeman. St. Louis: Skinner and Kennedy, 1916.

TZ 329.3 L941BM Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
T329.3 L941BYA Center for American History. Use in library only.

Banking legislation in Texas, past, present and future, by Hon. Thos. B. Love, commissioner of banking. Address delivered before Texas Bankers' Association, Fort Worth, Texas, June 5, 1908. Dallas: 1908?

TZ 332.1 L941B Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Brief showing the result of the ballot for national committeeman in the Democratic State Convention at San Antonio, Texas, May 23 and 24, 1916 by Thomas B. Love. Dallas: W.M. Warlick, 1916.

TZ 329.3 L941B Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
T329.3 L941B Center for American History. Use in library only.

In the Supreme Court of Texas. Thomas B. Love, realtor, vs. D.W. Wilcox, et al., respondents. Attorneys to assist Thomas B. Love, or his counsel: Walter C. Woodward (and others.) Austin: 1930.

TZ 324.764 L941I Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

State taxation. N.P.: General Managers Association of Texas, 1905. A communication on taxation by Joseph D. Sayers. Reply of Hon. Thomas B. Love to Gov. Joseph D. Sayers. Reply of Gov. Joseph D. Sayers to Hon. Thomas B. Love.

T336.764 ST29 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Vertical File: Love, Thomas B. (Center for American History)

The file contains the following newspaper clippings:

  • An undated article from an unknown newspaper headlined, "How It Happened—By Thomas B. Love" in which Love argues that Herbert Hoover, a Republican, carried Texas in the 1928 presidential race because of the Democratic nominee Al Smith's support for repealing the Prohibition amendment. Love denies that his opposition to Smith was due to prejudice against Smith, a Catholic.
  • An August 2, 1932, Dallas Morning News article, "Love, Over Radio, Discusses 'Fergusonism at Its Worst,'" reprints a Love speech in its entirety. Love condemns Jim and Miriam Ferguson for cronyism, bribery, and public deceit.
  • An August 17, 1941, Dallas Morning News article, "Let's Enter War On F.R.'s Say-So, Tom Love's Advice," in which Love urges support for President Franklin Roosevelt's policies toward Germany and Japan.
  • Newspaper obituaries for Love from 1948 and for Horace Goode Love, the former state attorney general's son, from 1957.

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AUSTIN MILTON KENNEDY
(1866–1914)
40th Speaker
(1909–1909)

Presided over

The 31st Legislature's regular session, January 12 to March 13, 1909; and part of the 31st Legislature's 1st called session, March 14–March 15, 1909.

Born in Alabama on July 16, 1866, Austin Milton Kennedy arrived with his parents in Texas in 1870. The Kennedys settled in Limestone County. As a teenager, the largely self-taught Kennedy began writing articles for local newspapers and working as a printer. By 1887, at the age of 21, Kennedy founded and edited the Mexia Democrat. After five years, he sold that newspaper in order to acquire part of the Waco Daily Day. He landed in hot water with his Waco readership, however, when he supported Governor James Stephen Hogg over the much more conservative George Clark of Waco in the 1892 Democratic gubernatorial primary. Kennedy, however, continued to own an interest in several newspapers and was majority owner of a Mexia printing company.

Kennedy unsuccessfully ran for the state House of Representatives in 1894, losing to a Populist Party candidate, but won a House seat representing Mexia in 1898 and 1900. Moving to Mart, he won election to the House in 1904 and 1906. He also served in the House as a resident of Waco in 1908 and 1910, and finally as a resident of Kerrville in 1913. He became chair of the House Committee on Revenue and Taxation before rising to speaker his last legislative session.

Kennedy wrote many significant bills while in the Legislature, including a law placing a tax on the gross receipts of business corporations in 1905, and a 1907 bill enacting the state's corporate franchise tax. In 1911, he successfully proposed an amendment to the state Constitution providing for "home rule." This provision allowed cities of more than 5,000 in population to select their own form of municipal government.

Rising to the speakership in 1909, Kennedy soon became embroiled in controversy. Accused of improperly spending state funds without legislative approval for his staff and to provide furniture for his official residence in the Capitol building, Kennedy faced a serious challenge at the beginning of the 31st Legislature's called session when a resolution passed the House March 13 calling for his resignation. Two days later, on March 15, Kennedy stepped down as speaker.

In spite of the scandal, Kennedy remained in the House for two additional terms and, in 1911, he again became chair of the key Committee on Revenue and Taxation. He also chaired the Committee on Rules. Kennedy died in Kerrville on July 19, 1914, while still in office during the 33rd Legislature.

University Materials Related to Speaker Kennedy

Books:

Mr. Sam. Written by C. Dwight Dorough. New York, Random House (c1962).

E 748 R24 D6 HRC KNOPF Alfred/Blanche Knopf Lib. Use in library only.
LAW E 748 R24 D6 1962 Law Library
973.918 R213BD Center for American History. Use in library only.
TZZ 973.918 R213BD Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
973.918 R213BD PCL Stacks

Rayburn: a biography. Written by D.B. Hardeman & Donald C. Bacon. Austin, Tex.: Texas Monthly Press, c1987.

E 748 R24 H37 1987 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Public Affairs Library
LAW E 748 R24 H37 1987 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Kennedy, A. M. (Center for American History)

Contains a 1914 House Journal memorial, "In Memory of Hon. A. M. Kennedy."

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