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Guide to 41st through 50th Speakers

Guide to 41st through 50th Speakers

JOHN WESLEY MARSHALL
(1869–1944)
41st Speaker
(1909–1911)

Presided over

Part of the 31st Legislature's first called session, March 15 to April 11, 1909; the 31st Legislature's second called session, April 12 to May 11, 1909; the 31st Legislature's third called session, July 19 to August 17, 1910; and the 31st Legislature's fourth called session, August 18 to September 10, 1910.

Born in Jacksonville in the East Texas county of Cherokee on February 23, 1869, John Wesley Marshall grew up in Grayson County near modern-day Oklahoma. Marshall helped his father operate a hardware store in Whitesboro, where he became mayor and helped establish the First National Bank of Whitesboro.

First elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1908, Marshall rose to the speakership during his first term after a scandal involving Speaker A. M. Kennedy, who was accused of spending state money for private use. A member of the key House Appropriations, Banks, Public Lands, and Internal Improvements committees, Marshall called for Kennedy's resignation. When Kennedy stepped down during the Legislature's first called session in 1909, Marshall easily captured that office even though his strongly Prohibitionist views placed him at odds with the "wet" faction in the House.

Another scandal, over the state prison system, came to dominate Marshall's speakership. News accounts and a legislative committee report slammed the prison system for shoddy financial record keeping, low quality food and clothing for prisoners, unhealthy sanitation, and repeated instances of violence and even murder committed against inmates. During the 31st Legislature's 4th called session, a bill was passed that created a prison board appointed by the governor and assisted by an auditor to supervise the prison system. The law also abolished the leasing of prison labor to outside contractors.

Following his one busy term in the House, Marshall moved to Sherman and ran a real estate business. During Governor William P. Hobby's administration, he served on the board of trustees for Kidd-Key College, now defunct, and later as a regent for the state's teachers college system. He died in Denison on November 22, 1944.

University Materials Related to Speaker Marshall

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


SAM TALIAFERRO RAYBURN
(1882–1961)
42nd Speaker
(1911–1913)

Presided over

The 32nd Legislature's regular session, January 10 to March 11, 1911; and the 32nd Legislature's 1st called session, July 31 to August 29, 1911.

Born in Roane County in eastern Tennessee on January 6, 1882, Sam Rayburn moved with his family in 1887 to a forty-acre cotton farm near Windom in Fannin County, Texas. The Rayburns then moved to nearby Bonham, which became the family's permanent homestead. Rayburn earned a bachelor's degree from East Texas Normal College and worked as a schoolteacher for two years before pursuing a law degree and a career in politics.

In 1906, Rayburn won election to the state House of Representatives while finishing his law degree at the University of Texas at Austin. He earned admission to the bar by 1908. Re-elected to the House in 1908 he made his mark with his vigorous defense of his mentor Austin M. Kennedy, who was forced to resign the speakership after a scandal involving the spending of state money on Kennedy's staff and furniture at the Speaker's Apartment.

When Kennedy resigned in 1909, momentum built to elect Rayburn speaker, but his prospects withered due to heated opposition from former House Speaker Thomas Love. Rayburn's defense of Kennedy, who was seen by Love as corrupt, and the Bonham representative's close association with Senator Joe Bailey, a staunch opponent of Prohibition, offended Love, who threw his support behind John Marshall. Rayburn lost the heated race, but he entered his next term with enhanced stature.

Rayburn narrowly won the speaker's race in 1911, beating Clarence E. Gilmore 70-63. As speaker, he won respect for his decisive leadership and the orderly manner in which he presided over House debates. During his tenure, the House passed laws mandating shorter work hours for women, curbing child labor, creating a tuberculosis sanitarium and providing funding for a Confederate Widows Home. At the end of his speakership, he won election to the United States House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1912.

Rayburn served for 48 consecutive years in the United States House, the longest career ever in that chamber. He was majority leader from 1937 to 1940, and became speaker for the first time in 1940, a post he filled until 1948 when Republicans briefly gained control of the House. He was then minority leader until 1950, serving his second stint as speaker until 1954. He was again minority leader until 1956, subsequently holding on to the speakership until his death in 1961. A strong supporter of the New Deal, Rayburn played a role in passage of almost every significant piece of legislation passed by the U.S. Congress in the first half of the twentieth century. Laws Rayburn helped shape and pass included the Truth in Securities Act, the Securities and Exchange Commission Act, the Federal Communications Commission Act, the Public Utilities Holding Company Act, the Emergency Railroad Transportation Act, and the Rural Electrification Act.

A loyalist Democrat, Rayburn consistently supported the Democratic nominee for president, a position that drew much opposition from the conservative wing of the party in Texas. Conservatives disliked that Rayburn played a key role in enacting Franklin Roosevelt's liberal New Deal and Harry Truman's Fair Deal programs. They became angrier in the 1950s when Rayburn campaigned for Democratic presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson. This support came though most leading Texas Democrats, including Gov. Allan Shivers, expressed anger at Stevenson's support for African American civil rights and for federal control of the Texas Tidelands, with Shivers backing Republican candidate Dwight Eisenhower in the 1952 and 1956 races for the White House.

Yet, even if he enraged conservative Texas Democrats, for the most part Rayburn could be considered a moderate. Rayburn's set a high standard for integrity, accepting no money from lobbyists, going on only one congressional junket in forty-eight years, a trip in which he paid his own way. He was effective in bringing congressional projects to his district, including rural electrification, and federally funded farm-to-market roads. Rayburn also ensured the creation of Lake Texoma and Lavon Lake and air bases such as Perrin Field located near Sherman.

The Sam Rayburn Library, operated by the Center for American History, opened at Bonham in 1957 and was dedicated by former President Truman. The library housed Rayburn's public and private papers until they were moved to the Center for American History, located at the University of Texas at Austin. Rayburn died of cancer at age seventy-nine on November 16, 1961.

University Materials Related to Speaker Rayburn

Books:

Sam Rayburn: leading the lawmakers. Written by Edward Allen. Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica Press, 1963.

E 748 R24 A7 Youth Collection PCL Stacks 6S
TZZ 973.918 R213BA Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BA Center for American History. Use in library only.

The years of Lyndon Johnson. Volume 1. The Path to Power. Volume 2. Means of Ascent. Volume 3. Master of the Senate. Written by Robert A. Caro. New York: Knopf, 1982–.

E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 3
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 4
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 5
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 1
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 PCL Stacks Copy 3
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 Center for American History Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.1 Public Affairs Library
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 PCL Stacks
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 PCL Stacks Copy 1
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 Center for American History Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 Center for American History Copy 2 Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 Public Affairs Library
E 847 C34 1982 V.2 Public Affairs Library Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks Copy 3
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks Copy 4
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 Center for American History Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 Public Affairs Library
E 847 C34 1982 V.3 Public Affairs Library Copy 2

Congressman Sam Rayburn. Written by Anthony Champagne. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, c. 1984.

E 748 R24 C47 1984 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 C47 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 748 R24 C47 1984 PCL Stacks Library
E 748 R24 C47 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 C47 1984 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
LAW E 748 R24 C47 1984 Law Library

Sam Rayburn: a bio-bibliography. Written by Anthony Champagne. New York: Greenwood Press, 1988.

E 748 R24 C48 1988 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 C48 1988 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Mr. Speaker. Written by David L. Cohn. United States: s.n.: c1942.

E 748 R24 C583 1942 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Lyndon B. Johnson: portrait of a president. Written by Robert Dallek. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.

Notes: This work is a one volume abridgment of Dallek's 2-volume biography of Lyndon B. Johnson v. 1. Lone star rising (1991); v. 2, Flawed giant (1998).

E 847 D26 2004 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 847 D26 2004 Public Affairs Library
LAW E 847 D25 1991 Law Library

Lone star rising: Lyndon Johnson and his times, 1908–1960. Written by Robert Dallek New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.

E 847 D25 1991 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 D25 1991 PCL Stacks Copy 3
E 847 D25 1991 PCL Stacks
E 847 D25 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 847 D25 1991 Public Affairs Library
LAW E 847 D25 1991 Law Library

Flawed giant: Lyndon Johnson and his times, 1961–1973. Written by Robert Dallek. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

E 847 D26 1998 PCL Stacks
E 847 D26 1998 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 847 D26 1998 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 847 D26 1998 Public Affairs Library
LAW E 847 D26 1998 Law Library

Mr. Sam. Written by C. Dwight Dorough. New York: Random House, c. 1962.

E 748 R24 D6 HRC KNOPF Alfred/Blanche Knopf Lib. HRC. Use in library only.
LAW E 748 R24 D6 1962 Law Library
TZZ 973.918 R213BD Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BD Center for American History. Use in library only.
973.918 R213BD PCL Stacks

Speak, Mister Speaker. Compiled and edited by H. G. Dulaney and Edward Hake Phillips; with a chapter introduction by MacPhelan Reese). Bonham, Tex.: Sam Rayburn Foundation, 1978.

E 748 R24 A25 1978 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 A25 1978 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Impressions of Mr. Sam: a cartoon profile. Edited by H.G. Dulaney and Edward Hake Phillips, with preface by MacPhelan Reese. Bonham, Tex.: Sam Rayburn Foundation, 1987.

E 748 R24 I477 1987 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 I477 1987 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 I477 1987 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 I477 1987 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

Rayburn: a biography. Written by D.B. Hardeman & Donald C. Bacon. Austin, Tex.: Texas Monthly Press, c. 1987.

E 748 R24 H37 1987 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 H37 1987 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 H37 1987 Public Affairs Library
LAW E 748 R24 H37 1987 Law Library

Profiles in power: twentieth-century Texans in Washington. Edited by Kenneth E. Hendrickson, Jr., Michael L. Collins, and Patrick Cox. Arlington Heights, Ill.: Harlan Davidson, c. 1993.

F 385 P76 1993 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 385 P76 2004 PCL Stacks

Allan Shivers: the Pied Piper of Texas politics. Written by Sam Kinch and Stuart Long. Austin, Tex., Shoal Creek Publishers (c. 1973).

F 391 S562 K56 1974 PCL Stacks
F 391 S562 K56 1974 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
F 391 S562 K56 1974 Public Affairs Library

Sam and the speaker's chair. Written by Maurine Walpole Liles. Austin, Tex.: Eakin Press, c. 1994.

E 748 R24 L55 1994 Center for American History TXC-J Collection. Use in library only.

The Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Analyzed and explained (by) Charles H. Meyer. New York, N.Y.: F.E. Fitch, c. 1934.

"This book consists of two parts: Part 1, The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Fletcher-Rayburn Act), Part 2, The Securities Act of 1933, as amended in 1934"– P. 5.

332.6 M575S PCL Stacks

Roosevelt and Rayburn: a political partnership. Written by Booth Mooney. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1971.

E 806 M72 Public Affairs Library
TZZ 973.917 M779R Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T973.917 M779R Center for American History. Use in library only.
973.917 R677BMO PCL Stacks

Speak, Mister Speaker: The Sam Rayburn Library newsletter. Bonham, Tex.: The Sam Rayburn Foundation, 1980–.

Center for American History E 748 R24 S68 NO.1–18 1980–87 through NO.19–32 1988–01. Use in library only.

Sam Rayburn: a biography. Written by Alfred Steinberg. New York: Hawthorn Books, 1975.

E 748 R24 Public Affairs Library
E 748 R24 S845 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 S845 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 S845 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

The Speaker's agent. Written by Valton Joseph Young New York: Vantage Press, 1956.

E 748 R24 Y6 HRC DOBIE J. Frank Dobie Library. Use in library only.
TZZ 973.918 R213BY Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BY Center for American History. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BY Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Failed argument, successful assault: the two phases of Sam Rayburn's battle to abolish utilities holding companies. Written by David Sewell. 1995.

KF 2099 A32 A16 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Dissertations and Theses:

Sam Rayburn, trials of a party man. Written by Edward O. Daniel. Denton, Texas: North Texas State University, 1979. (Thesis (Ph.D.)–North Texas State University, 1979.)

E 748 R24 D35 1981 PCL Stacks

Sam Rayburn, Congressional leader, 1940–1952. Written by Kenneth Dewey Hairgrove. Lubbock, Tex.: Texas Tech University, 1974. (Thesis (Ph.D.)–Texas Tech University, 1974.)

E 748 R24 H34 1974A PCL Stacks

The political leadership of Speaker Sam Rayburn, 1940–1961. Written by Dwayne L. Little. Cincinnati: University of Cincinnati, 1970, c1971. (Thesis (Ph.D.)–University of Cincinnati.)

FILM 3713 Microforms PCL Level 1. Use in library only.

An analysis of the persuasion of Speaker Sam Rayburn, 1940–1961. Written by Robert Orlan Miller. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1972. (Thesis (Ph.D.)–Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1972.)

E 748 R24 M555 1972A PCL Stacks

"You are known by your political enemies": Bruce Alger and Sam Rayburn, 1954–1964. Written by Anthony Scoma. 1995.

E 835 S365 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Sam Rayburn and the New Deal, 1933–1936. Written by Alexander Graham Shanks University of North Carolina, 1964. (Thesis–University of North Carolina.)

TZ 973.918 R213YS Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.

The nature and impact of the relationship that existed between Sam Rayburn and Lyndon Johnson. Written by Roy Douglas Wallace. Austin, Tex.: The University of Texas, 1976. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Texas at Austin.

THESIS 1976 W155 PCL Stacks Copy 2
THESIS 1976 W155 Request at Periodicals Desk PCL Level 2 Copy 1. Use in library only. Item in library storage facility.

Mr. Speaker and the call to arms: the role of Sam Rayburn in the 1941 extension of the Selective Service Act. Written by George Stockton Wills. University of Virginia, 1962. Thesis (M.A.)–University of Virginia, 1962.

UB 343 W44 1962A PCL Stacks
UB 343 W44 1962A Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Documents:

Rayburn, Sam, papers, 1906–1990. Center for American History.

The collection is organized by chronological arrangement and by topic and type of material. One folder in this collection, 3R268–1911 (Messages to Rayburn on Becoming Speaker, Texas Legislature), pertains to his Texas speakership.

Guide to the microfilm edition of the Sam Rayburn papers. Bonham, Texas 1972.

- Q - E 748 R24 S247 Center for American History. Use in library only.
- Q - E 748 R24 S247 Center for American History. Copy 2. Use in library only.

Kelley, Dee J., Sr., papers, 1996. 1 item. Center for American History.

Dee J. Kelley, Sr., is a Fort Worth, Texas, lawyer and businessman who began his career as an assistant to Sam Rayburn. The collection contains the text of speech delivered at the annual Sam Rayburn Barbeque in Bonham, Texas, on October 9, 1996.

The leadership of Speaker Sam Rayburn; collected tributes of his congressional colleagues. A compilation of tributes paid him in the Hall of the House of Representatives, June 12, 1961, and other pertinent material, to celebrate the occasion of his having served as speaker twice as long as any of his predecessors in the history of the United States: sixteen years and 273 days. Prepared and printed in accordance with House Concurrent Resolution 342, passed July 20, 1961, by the Eighty-seventh Congress, first session. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1961.

E 748 R24 U53 Humanities Research Center. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 U53 PCL Stacks
E 748 R24 U53 PCL Stacks Copy 2
E 748 R24 U53 Center for American History. Use in library only.
E 748 R24 U53 Public Affairs Library
- Q - TZZ 973.918 R213BUN Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
- Q - TZZ 973.918 R213BUN Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection Copy 2. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BUN Center for American History. Use in library only.

The beginning of the end: the sickness, death and funeral of Speaker Sam Rayburn: as reported by the Bonham Daily Favorite. By Aubrey McAlister. Bonham, Tex.?: A. McAlister, 197–?.

E 748 R24 M36 1970Z Center for American History. Use in library only.

Memorial service held in the House of Representatives and Senate of the United States, together with remarks presented in eulogy of Sam Rayburn, late a Representative from Texas. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1962.

DOCS Y7.1:R213 U.S. Congressional Documents PCL Stacks 5H–5J
E 748 R24 U54 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
TZZ 973.918 R213BU Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BU Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
T973.918 R213BU Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Proceedings at the dedication of the Sam Rayburn Statue: Main Stair Hall, Independence Avenue entrance, Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, D.C., January 6, 1965. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1965. Series: House document (United States. Congress 89th, 1st session: 1965, House); no. 50.

E 748 R24 P7 PCL Stacks
T973.918 R213YU Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.

Photographs:

Adams, Walter Dickson, photographs. Center for American History.

200 photoprints, with some tintype, albumen, and gelatin silver.
6 postcards.
11 negatives: glass and film.
36 photomechanical reproductions.Arranged alphabetically by persons and places. Adams was editor of Texas Druggist Magazine, 1922–1942, and served as president of the Texas Pharmaceutical Association and the American Pharmaceutical Association. Photos of Sam Rayburn are included in this collection.

Lee, Russell, photograph collection, 1935–1977. Center for American History.

Arranged by chronology and format. Documentary photographer Russell Lee worked for the Farm Security Administration from 1936 to 1942 and remained active in the field of documentary photography until 1977. This collection includes photographs of Sam Rayburn.

Vertical Files and Scrapbooks: Rayburn, Sam Taliaferro (Center for American History)

Scrapbook (1): 1932–1943

Several clippings center on Congressman Rayburn's pledge to support fellow Texan John Nance Garner's 1932 presidential bid. A campaign newsletter from 1932, "Hon. Sam Rayburn Replies To Campaign Misrepresentations" in which he counters various charges by political opponents in his congressional district, including one that he voted to raise his own salary, that he had practiced nepotism while a member of the state legislature, etc.

Press account from 1937 concern Rayburn's support of President Franklin Roosevelt's legislative programs. An August 13, 1939, Dallas Morning News
story indicates that Rayburn supported a potential 1940 presidential campaign by Garner and stories suggest that a rift between Rayburn and Roosevelt over Rayburn's support for Garner was unlikely. An August 22, 1939, Dallas Morning News story describes Rayburn as a dark horse candidate in the following year's presidential race. Several 1939 stories cover Rayburn's support of a Dennison dam to span the Red River.

Other 1939 stories indicate Rayburn's support for amending the U.S. neutrality laws to allow the United States to sell arms to countries that needed weapons for self-defense. Several 1940 accounts speculate that Rayburn is a vice presidential prospect for Roosevelt in that year's re-election campaign. A September 16, 1940, Dallas Morning News story covers Majority Leader Rayburn's ascension to U.S. House Speaker upon the death of Speaker William B. Bankhead of Alabama; and several newspapers review Rayburn's career following his rise to the U.S. House speakership.

Numerous press accounts from 1942 concern Rayburn's support for Roosevelt's war policies. In another clip, Dallas Morning News columnist Lynn Landrum criticizes that support. A March 24, 1942, Dallas Morning News story details Rayburn's support for increasing the work week from 40 hours to 48 hours, with no time-and-half pay beginning until after 48 hours.

Clippings from the April 29, 1943, Dallas Morning News cover a Rayburn speech from the podium of the Texas House. The News noted that Rayburn presided as Texas House speaker 32 years earlier. One story, "Smith Assails Sam Rayburn in Bitter Words," notes a rift between Texas Lt. Gov. John Lee Smith and Rayburn. Smith describes Rayburn as "chief apologist for the bungling policies of the Washington bureaucrats, and especially of the labor coddling policy of the administration which has brewed the broth of strife which now threatens our war efforts." Several stories regard support for Rayburn as a vice presidential candidate in 1944.

Scrapbook (2): 1944–1946

The scrapbook contains news coverage of the 1944 congressional race between Rayburn and state Sen. G. C. Morris of Greenville, who accuses Rayburn of being a Washington insider out of touch with Texas who has allowed a bloated federal bureaucracy to expand even before World War II started; newspaper accounts of Rayburn's bid to be selected as the Democrats' vice presidential nominee in 1944; and a July 14, 1944, Dallas Morning News story reporting that Rayburn does not want to be considered by Roosevelt for the vice presidency.

An April 23, 1945, Austin American feature story describes Sam Rayburn's
Washington office and the history-making decisions made there. Other
stories include June 1945 stories on President Harry Truman's proposals for changes in the law regarding presidential succession and how that might boost Rayburn's and future speakers' power. Press speculation in 1946 centers on whether Rayburn would be Truman's running mate in 1948. Other stories include August 1946 coverage of a possible challenge by Southern congressmen to Rayburn's leadership because of the speaker¹s perceived ties to organized labor; October 1946 stories on Rayburn's prediction that the Democrats would maintain control of both houses of Congress in that year's Congressional elections; November 1946 stories in which Rayburn hints, after Democrats lose control of the House, that he does not want to serve as House minority leader and the resulting "Draft Rayburn" movement among House Democrats.

Scrapbook (3): 1947–1949

Press stories dating from January 1947 cover Rayburn's selection by U.S. House Democrats as minority leader. February 1947 stories detail banquets given in Rayburn's honor and the gift of a new Cadillac to Rayburn by grateful Democratic colleagues. A May 23, 1947, Austin American story indicates that Texas' poll tax law would prevent Rayburn's selection as President Harry Truman's running mate. Numerous 1947 stories reveal Rayburn's support for foreign aid to European countries to stop the spread of communism there. Other stories concerning the speaker¹s opposition to the Taft-Hartley labor law.

A February 22, 1948, Austin American story, "Solons on Spot on Civil Rights," is about the political difficulties that President Truman's civil rights proposals posed for Rayburn as a minority leader from a segregationist congressional district. Subsequent clippings concern Rayburn¹s simultaneous rebuke of Truman's civil rights policies and his attempts to prevent a revolt of Southern congressmen against the president. In these stories, Rayburn declares that he is against a repeal of the poll tax, opposed to making lynching a federal offense; and would vote against an attempt to set up a permanent fair employment practice commission. Stories from May 1948 concern Rayburn's selection as permanent chair for the Democratic National Convention that summer. An August 1948 Dallas Morning News story describes Sam Rayburn's joint endorsement of Truman's re-election with Texas Gov. Beauford Jester. An August 15, 1948, Dallas Morning News covers Rayburn's efforts to have the Dixiecrats, who split from the Democratic Party over Truman's civil rights policies, to be placed on the November ballot in Texas as a separate party and not as the regular Democratic Party. Stories from September cover Truman's visit to Rayburn's hometown of Bonham.

November news accounts concern Rayburn's recapture of the Speaker's Office after the Democrats won control of the House and detail the speaker-to-be's work to repair rifts within the party. May 1949 press coverage concerns Truman's unhappiness with Rayburn's watering down of a proposed bill that would have repealed previous Taft-Hartley legislation regulating unions. Most of the last third of the scrapbook contains clippings covering the dispute between the federal government and the state of Texas over control of the Texas tidelands. A November 3, 1949, Dallas Morning News story, "Rayburn urges Poll Tax Death," quotes Rayburn as saying a repeal of the poll tax in Texas would aid the United States in its battle with the Soviet Union for the world's hearts and minds. A November 1949 Austin American story announces the planned construction of a Rayburn library in Bonham. Two November 1949 Dallas Morning News stories concern trial balloons for a Rayburn presidential bid in 1952.

Scrapbook (4): 1950–1953

A clipping from the January 17, 1950, Dallas Morning News, "Rayburn to Fight House Rules Switch," concerns the efforts of Southern Democrats and their conservative Republican allies to change House procedures to make it easier for the House Rules Committee to block civil rights legislation and other aspects of President Truman's Fair Deal program. A February 5, 1950, Dallas Morning News story, "Despite Texas 'Noes,' Public Housing Hums," concerns how more Texas cities have made use of federal money supporting public housing than any other state in spite of the fact that two-thirds of the Texas House delegation opposes such programs.

A January 31, 1951, Austin American story, "Rayburn Cracks Record as Speaker
of the House," notes that as of January 30 Rayburn set a new record for duration as speaker, breaking the previous tenure record of Henry Clay. A June 3, 1951, Austin American story, "Rayburn Defends President for Firing Gen. MacArthur," details Rayburn's support for Truman's Korean War policies; and a November 24, 1951, Saturday Evening Post feature, "They're Just Crazy About Sam," reports Rayburn's continuing popularity among his House colleagues after nine years as speaker and 39 years as a member of the House.

Stories from November 1951 to May 1952 detail how Rayburn will accept the House minority leader position again after the Republicans regain control of the House; articles on the efforts of pro-Eisenhower Texas Gov. Allan Shivers' Democratic allies to block Rayburn's nomination as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention because of Rayburn's support for the Fair Deal. Other stories report on the challenge of conservative Democrat Reagan Brown to Rayburn's congressional re-election bid in the 1952 primaries and Rayburn's anger at the challenge. An August 2, 1952, political ad from Rayburn's supporters blasts the Dallas Mornings News' alleged editorial bias against the speaker. Other 1952 news accounts cover Rayburn's support for Adlai Stevenson's presidential bid and the Speaker's difficulties in getting the Texas Congressional delegation to publicly support the Stevenson campaign. A January 5, 1953, Dallas Morning News story, "Rayburn Finishes Job as Speaker," covers the transfer of power from Speaker Rayburn to Republican Joseph Martin of Massachusetts after Republicans won the off-year Congressional elections. An October 10, 1953, Dallas Morning News story, "Control Problem in the State Party," notes that liberal Democrats celebrate
when their conservative peers in the party switch to the GOP because such trends will make it more difficult for conservative Democrats like Allan Shivers to maintain control of the party. The story suggests that Rayburn would welcome such a development.

Scrapbook (5): 1954–1955

Clippings concerns Rayburn's declaration that Democrats are tired of being labeled soft on communism. A March 2, 1954, Dallas Morning News story "Luck Protects Texans as Bullets Whiz Past," notes the close call members of the Texas House delegation experienced when Puerto Rican nationalists fired at members from the House gallery. Other stories include a March 28, 1954, item from the Wichita Daily Times,"Sam Rayburn Library is Planned at Bonham," noting that construction of the facility is underway; and a September 11, 1954, New York Times article, "Rayburn, in reply to Eisenhower, Scores Administration as 'Inept,'" in which Rayburn charges that the Republican White House has not spoken with one voice on foreign policy, had failed farmers and had increased the national debt.

Several late 1954 and early 1955 clippings concern Rayburn's rise again as
speaker of the House and provide retrospectives on his lengthy congressional
career. A February 6, 1955, New York Times Magazine feature story, "Then Martin, Now Rayburn, and So On," covers how Rayburn and his Republican colleague Joseph W. Martin of Massachusetts have traded the role of Speaker and House Minority leader three times and have evolved as joint leaders of the House. A July 10, 1955, Dallas Morning News story, "Rayburn-for-President Move Reported Under Way," notes Texas support for a favorite son candidacy for Rayburn in the 1956 presidential race. An October 30, 1955, Dallas Morning News story, "Peace Isn't In Sight For Texas Democrats," notes the continuing bitter divisions between liberals and pro-Gov. Shivers conservatives in the Texas Party and the bitterness of some liberal towards party loyalists like Sen. Lyndon Johnson and Sam Rayburn for their support of conservative Lt. Gov. Ben Ramsey's placement as a delegate on the Democratic National Committee. An October 28, 1955, Austin American article, "Pledged Delegation Urged by Rayburn," outlines the speaker's
support for sending an instructed delegation to the next year's Democratic National Convention pledged to support the party's nominees.

Scrapbook (6): 1956–1957

A December 11, 1955, Dallas Morning News article, "Rayburn Breaks Ground for His Library Project," details progress on construction of the Rayburn Library in Bonham. An April 1, 1956, Dallas Morning News article, "New Attack Called Cruel By Rayburn" quotes the speaker as bitterly countering what he said was an assault on his patriotism by Texas Gov. Allan Shivers who accused Rayburn of being "a Democrat first and an American second." The story indicates that the exchange of words was part of a battle for control of the state Democratic Party and that Shivers was responding to Rayburn's public support of a Lyndon Johnson's favorite son presidential candidacy. Later clippings quote Rayburn as blasting Shivers for "Rat Alley" politics.

A June 19, 1956, Dallas Morning News article, "Republicans Take Aim at Rayburnland," describe Republican court challenges of the state's Congressional district boundaries, in place since 1933, and notes the GOP's keen interest in redrawing Rayburn's fourth district to include part of increasingly Republican Northeast Dallas County. Two April 27, 1956, clippings, one from the Dallas Morning News and the other from the Austin American, describe a cross burning that took place on the front lawn of Rayburn's Texas home while the speaker was in Washington. Several September 1956 articles describe Rayburn's late-life baptism at the Tioga Primitive Baptist Church in Grayson County on September 2.

A November 23, 1956, Austin American article, "Negro Solon Spreads Rap for Rayburn" notes that New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell circulated on the House floor copies of a newspaper editorial describing Rayburn as "bigoted." The article suggests that Powell was responding to the House Democratic leadership stripping him of patronage privileges because of his support for President Dwight Eisenhower's re-election bid. Several articles from late 1956 and early 1957 concern signs of revolt from liberal House and Senate Democrats frustrated with Rayburn and Texas Senator and Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson's moderate conservative leadership. Numerous clippings from early 1957 cover Rayburn's 75th birthday, describing events held in his honor and reporting dedication ceremonies at his Bonham Library. June, July, and August 1956 clippings describe the reaction of other Southerncongressmen and senators to Rayburn's and Johnson's compromises with Republican leaders on civil rights legislation. Numerous October clippings center on the completion of the Rayburn library in Bonham and report details of the dedication ceremonies.

Four clippings from February 5, 1958, three from the Dallas Morning News and one from the Austin American, report Rayburn's support for an amendment or a law that would allow the vice president to serve as chief executive at times the president is disabled. The discussion was inspired by President Dwight Eisenhower's heart problems and Vice President Richard Nixon's assumption of some presidential duties during that time. A March 9, 1958, article discusses Rayburn's controversial support for expanding the eastern front of the United States Capitol building. A May 9, 1958, Austin American article says that the House Office Building might be named for Rayburn.

A January 4, 1959, Dallas Morning News article reports Rayburn's agreement with House Republican leader Joseph W. Martin to not approve rule changes governing the House Rules Committee. Some reform advocates complained that the powerful Rules Committee bottled up key legislation. Several clips from the summer of 1959 detail the efforts of liberal Democrats to end Rayburn's long reign as Permanent Chair of the Democratic National Convention, a post he has held since 1948.

Scrapbook (7): 1960–1961

A January 13, 1960, Daily Texan article, "Mr. Sam Steps Off Dem Rostrum," observes that Rayburn resigned his long-time role as chairman of the Democratic National Convention. A November 10, 1960, Dallas Times Herald article, "Rayburn Avers Dallas Disgraced," quotes Rayburn as arguing that Dallas County embarrassed itself with its heavy vote for Republican presidential nominee Richard Nixon and GOP senatorial candidate John Tower. Numerous articles from late 1960 and early 1961 regard Rayburn's actions to support new President John Kennedy's legislative agenda and to calm restless liberals in the Democratic caucus; and numerous stories cover Rayburn's attempts to increase the number of liberals on the powerful House Rules Committee in order to get more of Kennedy's proposals before a vote of the full House.

In a July 2, 1961, Dallas Morning News article Rayburn declares that if Dallas gets a new Federal Center as wanted by city leaders, it will be in spite of Dallas Republican Congressman Bruce Alger, whose attitude he condemned. A June 13, 1961, Dallas Morning News article notes that Rayburn has doubled the length of Henry Clay's tenure (Clay had served longest as House Speaker before Rayburn.) Numerous stories starting on September 9, 1961, and continuing through November, report on Rayburn's failing health, his battle with cancer, and the visits to Rayburn at his home and his hospital bed from President John Kennedy, former President Harry Truman, Vice President Lyndon Johnson and other luminaries. An October 6, 1961, Dallas Morning News article relates Rayburn's story of how, through a quirk, he was elected speaker of the Texas House twice in one day.

Scrapbook (8): November 16, 1961 to January, 1965

Numerous stories from November 6, 1961, reporting the death of Sam Rayburn and lengthy retrospectives on his political career; extensive coverage of Rayburn's funeral; a November 30, 1961, Dallas Morning News article, "Library Benefits Most in Rayburn's Will," regarding the Rayburn library in Bonham; 1962 features on the issuance of a Rayburn stamp by the United States Post Office and the dedication of the Rayburn House Office Building; an October 13, 1963, Dallas Times Herald Magazine feature story on the Sam Rayburn Library; and a January 1, 1965, Austin American-Statesman feature on the dedication of the Sam Rayburn statue in the House office building bearing his name.

Scrapbook (9): May 1965 to January 1986

A May 9, 1965, Dallas Morning News article, "Sam Rayburn Dam Dedicated by LBJ," notes ceremonies in Jasper, Texas. Numerous articles cover the gold medal struck by the United States mint in honor of Rayburn. A September 17,  1966, Dallas Times Herald article describes the unveiling of a portrait of Rayburn by El Paso artist Tom Lea to be displayed in the Rayburn House Office Building. An August 7, 1967, Dallas Times Herald article reports on the placement of an historical marker at the Primitive Baptist Church of Tioga, where Rayburn was baptized late in life. A June 2, 1971, Bonham Daily Favorite article, "$96,500 is Approved For Work by State," regards renovations of the Sam Rayburn home and several subsequent stories on restoration efforts; numerous reviews of biographies of Sam Rayburn; a June 10, 1979, Sherman Democrat feature  discusses how Sam Rayburn's cars reflected his personality. The scrapbook also includes numerous career retrospectives.

Vertical File (1):  (Clippings)

The file contains a December 7, 1990, Daily Texan story, "UT to acquire former Speaker Rayburn's library," covering the university's purchase of the Bonham library and its future administration by the Barker Texas History Center (later renamed the Center for American History). A January 25, 1987, Dallas Morning News Dallas Life feature story, "Rayburn: A painfully personal chapter in a public life," concerns Rayburn's two-month and 25-day marriage to Metze Jones and the relationship's rapid breakup. The file also holds numerous clippings, mostly from the 1940s.

Vertical File (2):

The file contains a copy of a July 4, 1959, letter from Lewis Deschler, House Parliamentarian for the 70th to the 86th Congresses, noting the key role Rayburn played in allowing the House Resolution authorizing Alaskan statehood to be voted on. Also included is a copy of a September 16, 1942, letter from President Franklin Roosevelt thanking Rayburn for two years of "faithful and efficient service" as House speaker. The file holds a copy of the January 3, 1942, joint resolution by the 77th Congress declaring war on Japan as well as random newspaper clippings. Other items include:

A December 1, 1961, Life Magazine article, "Unseen Side Of The Man They Called Mr. Speaker," is a career retrospective by D. B. Hardeman. Also included is a November 1962 article in The Junior Historian, "Mister Speaker: Sam Rayburn of Texas" in which Joan Draeger reflects on Rayburn's long public career. An article, "'Mr. Sam' and Three Senators" by Lewis L.Gould from Discovery, Vol. 13, No. 3, describes Rayburn's close political relationship with Texans who became senator (Joe Bailey, Lyndon Johnson, and Lloyd Bentsen).  An extensive biographical article from the January 1995 Texas Highways by Gene Fowler, "Mr. Sam: The Bald Eagle from Bonham" and clippings mostly from the 1950s to the 1990s, including a story from the September 28, 1928, McKinney Daily Courier-Gazette, "Congressman Sam Rayburn Speaking for Gov. Al Smith in Presidential Race," rounds out the vertical file.

Vertical File (3): (Clippings–Duplicates and Can't Be Bound)

The file contains a reprint from the Congressional Record of a speech by Alabama Rep. John McDuffie on January 30, 1929, in which he reads into the record an article appearing in Bunker's Magazine praising the work of Rayburn on the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee. A  January 4, 1976, souvenir edition of the Bonham Daily Favorite is devoted largely to recalling the career of Rayburn. The file also holds a cover from the hardbound Alfred Steinberg book Sam Rayburn: A Biography. Other items include: A September 27, 1943, Time Magazine cover story, "Mr. Speaker"; a program from the Austin Area Garden Center and Garden Show Antique Show dedicated to the new Mr. Sam Marigold; a random collection of newspaper clipping from the 1950s and 1960s, including coverage of his funeral; and a January 14, 1946, Newsweek feature story, "Sam Rayburn, Texan," covering his popular reception upon a visit to his home district during a Congressional recess.

Vertical File (4):  (Miscellaneous)

The file holds the following: A printing of a Rayburn speech on farm legislation from the June 21, 1928, issue of the Congressional Record; a program and menu from a December 10, 1940, appreciation dinner for Rayburn; a January 18, 1941, Saturday Evening Post feature "Never Leave Them Angry: Sam Rayburn Tackles His Biggest Job," about Rayburn's rise to the United States House speakership and his leadership style; and a program for a January 31, 1947, banquet honoring Rayburn.

The file also include  an October 6, 1956, Saturday Evening Post article written by Sam Rayburn, "The Case for the Democrats"; a November 24, 1951, Saturday Evening Post feature, "They're Just Crazy About Sam," describing Rayburn's popularity among his peers in the United States House; a December 4, 1954, Business Week feature, "Sam Rayburn: Using 42 Years of Savvy to Help The Democrats," about Rayburn's ability to guide legislation backed by his party through a sometimes unfriendly Congress; a May 3, 1957, U.S. News & World Report article, "If Rayburn Says 'No,'" concerning the speaker's ability to block much of Eisenhower's legislative program if he chooses to and his desire for cuts in both taxes and spending; two programs from the October 9, 1957, dedication of the Sam Rayburn library; and a brochure from the Sam Rayburn library in Bonham.

The file also includes a February 10, 1961, Time Magazine cover story, "Darkened Victory," about Rayburn and his struggles with members of Congress over the makeup of the House Rules Committee; a November 17, 1961, Dallas  Times Herald feature, "'He Was a Great Teacher,' Mr. Sam's Pupils Recall," recounting memories of Rayburn's career as a teacher at a two-room school house in Dial in 1905 and 1906; a January 22, 1961, feature, ""Mr. Sam' . . . Speaker of the House!" from Texas, the Houston Chronicle magazine that briefly describing Rayburn's humble origins and his lengthy congressional career.

Other items include the front page from the November 16, 1961, issue of the Austin Statesman announcing Rayburn's death with the lead story, "Death Finally Cuts Off Rayburn's Long Career"; several copies of a program from the January 6, 1965, dedication of the Sam Rayburn statue at the Rayburn office building; and a pamphlet on the Sam Rayburn Dam and Reservoir and a program from the dam's May 8, 1965, dedication. The January 5, 1978, issue of the Bonham Daily Favorite marks "Sam Rayburn Day" in Texas.  A special section from the January 5, 1982, Daily Favorite notes the Sam Rayburn centennial. The file contains two copies of a September 14, 1990, Fort Worth Star-Telegram supplement, "Mr. Speaker: Sam Rayburn," printed in conjunction with the unveiling and dedication of Sam Rayburn Sculpture Plaza in Bonham; and the November 1991 edition of the Speak, Mister Speaker newsletter featuring stories on Rayburn's role in the 1941 draft extension
bill and Sam Rayburn and New Deal history.

Videotape:

The Sam Rayburn Library dedication United States: s.n., 1990?

1 videocassette (ca. 15 min.): sd., b&w; 1/2 in.
Originally released in 1957 as film of dedication ceremonies for the Sam Rayburn Library. Includes excerpts from speeches by William "Bill" Miller, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Harry Truman. Remarks by William Grolier, archivist to the U.S., and Robert Anderson, Secretary of the Treasury delivered during October 9, 1957 ceremonies dedicating the Sam Rayburn Library in Bonham, Texas. The film includes a brief tour of the library building. The library, built and supported by the Sam Rayburn Foundation, contains all Rayburn's personal papers and books and important documents from the Congressional Record.TXC copies 3 and 4 lack opening title frame and begin at actual dedication ceremonies.

VIDCASS 3814 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
VIDCASS 3814 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
VIDCASS 3814 Center for American History Copy 3. Use in library only.
VIDCASS 3814 Center for American History Copy 4. Use in library only.

Report, "Mr. Speaker": (an interview). Produced by KRLD News. Texas: s.n., 1990?

1 videocassette (30 min.): sd., b&w; 1/2 in.
Narrator, Ed Barker; writer, Claude Cox; film editor, Jim Ferguson; director, Leigh Webb. 1959 interview with Mr. Speaker (Sam Rayburn) who was speaker of the House for 16 years. Includes a personally conducted tour of the library and conversation with Lyndon Johnson.

VIDCASS 3815 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
VIDCASS 3815 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Sam. Texas: Mayah Productions, 1995.

1 videocassette (15 min.): sd., col, with b&w segments; 1/2 in. Prepared by Mayah Productions in association with the Sam Rayburn House and the Fannin County Museum of History. The film traces Sam Rayburn's life, especially his political career, in the Texas legislature and United States Congress. Mentions tourist attractions in Bonham, Tex.: Sam Rayburn House, Sam Rayburn Library, and Fannin County Museum of History.

VIDCASS 6332 Center for American History Copy 1. Use in library only.
VIDCASS 6332 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.

Top


CHESTER H. TERRELL
(1882–1920)
43rd Speaker
(1913–1915)

Presided over

The 33rd Legislature's regular session January 14 to April 1, 1913; the 33rd Legislature's 1st called session, July 21 to August 19, 1913; the 33rd Legislature's 2nd called session, August 24 to September 22, 1914; and the 33rd Legislature's 3rd called session, September 23 to October 22, 1914.

Born in Terrell in Kaufman County, Texas, on December 2, 1882, Chester H. Terrell moved with his family to San Antonio in 1895. Politics was the family business. Chester's father, J.O. Terrell, represented the Kaufman County as a state senator from 1885 to 1889. When the family moved to San Antonio, the elder Terrell earned the 1910 Republican nomination for governor, losing to Oscar B. Colquitt in the fall.

Chester Terrell enrolled in the University of Texas at Austin, where he received his law degree in 1904. Returning to San Antonio, he was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1909 at the age of 26. During his second term, he became chair of the House Committee on Jurisprudence. He served in the House until 1915, rising to the speakership during his last term. A split between the Prohibitionists over tactics allowed Terrell, a so-called "wet," to win the gavel. At age 30, he became the second youngest man to become speaker.

His session as speaker was one of the most divisive in Texas history. He introduced a number of proposals, including a bill calling for the appointment of a woman to care for female prisoners in urban areas, another that would have enlarged the Southwestern Insane Asylum; and yet another that called for an investigation of Texas water resources. In most cases, a more conservative Senate blocked his agenda. The House under his leadership did pass one of the state's first laws controlling water pollution.

Terrell announced, in 1915, his candidacy for governor, but he later withdrew due to illness. The next year, he wrote a public letter to Speaker Franklin O. Fuller calling for him to begin impeachment against Gov. James E. Ferguson, marking the end to Terrell's political career, though the long-time Democrat publicly campaigned for Republican Warren G. Harding in the 1920 presidential race. Terrell died on September 13, 1920.

University Materials Related to Speaker Terrell

Books:

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1973

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only. JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Documents:

Address of Hon. Chester H. Terrell delivered in the House of Representatives, Austin, Texas, April 1, 1913. Austin, Texas: Von Boeckman-Jones Co., 1913.

T976.409 T277A Center for American History. Use in library only.

Top


JOHN WILLIAM WOODS
(1875–1933)
44th Speaker
(1915–1917)

Presided over

The 34th Legislature's regular session, January 12 to March 20, 1915; and the 34th Legislature's 1st called session, April 29 to May 28, 1915.

Born in Denton County, Texas, on September 4, 1875, John William Woods settled with his family in Callahan County, where his father established a ranch. Woods attended the University of Texas law school in 1897, serving as Callahan County's prosecuting attorney while still a student, from 1898 to 1906. Moving to Fisher County in 1909, he became Rotan city attorney in 1909. Voters elected Woods to the Texas House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1912.

Woods quickly established himself as part of the Progressive caucus and showed a keen interest in women's and children's issues. In 1913, he wrote the Married Woman's Property Rights Act and sponsored a bill establishing the Gainesville Girls' Training School. During the same 33rd session of the Legislature, he also took the lead in passing the law establishing the fifty-four-hour work law for women.

Woods won re-election to the House and his peers selected him as speaker in 1915. From this post, he guided passage of the $1 million rural education appropriation law and co-wrote the compulsory 100-day school attendance law for children ages eight to fourteen.

After his speakership, Woods ran two unsuccessful campaigns for Texas attorney general in 1916 and 1918 and thus resumed his private law practice. He split his last years living in Baird, Abilene, and, finally, in Dallas, where he died after two years of illness on April 18, 1933.

Books:

The story of Texas schools. Written by Cecil Eugene Evans. Austin: Steck Co., 1955

TZZ 370.9764 EV15S Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
T370.9764 EV15S Center for American History. Use in library only.
370.9764 EV15S PCL Stacks Copy 1
370.9764 EV15S PCL Stacks Copy 2
370.9764 EV15S PCL Stacks. In Collection Deposit Library.

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1973

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only. JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Top


FRANKLIN OLIVER FULLER
(1873–1934)
45th Speaker
(1917–1919)

Presided over

The 35th Legislature's regular session, January 9 to March 21, 1917; the 35th Legislature's 1st called session, April 18 to May 17, 1917; the 35th Legislature's 2nd called session, August 1 to August 30, 1917; the 35th Legislature's 3rd called session, August 31 to September 29, 1917; and the 35th Legislature's 4th called session February 26 to March 27, 1918. 

Born on November 2, 1873, in Melrose, Texas, Franklin Oliver Fuller attended Sam Houston Normal Institute in Huntsville (now Sam Houston State University) and then earned a law degree in 1901 from Southern Normal University at Huntingdon, Tennessee. Following college, Fuller taught school in various communities across the state, including Nacogdoches, San Augustine, San Jacinto, and Walker counties. In 1901, Fuller was admitted to the bar and became San Jacinto county attorney, an office he filled from 1904 to 1906.

Fuller won election to the Texas House of Representatives in 1906, representing a district that included Angelina, Polk, San Augustine, and San Jacinto counties in East Texas. He won re-election in 1908 but skipped the next election cycle due to business problems. He returned to the House in 1913, this time representing Polk and San Jacinto counties.

He won re-election in 1915 and 1917. His peers selected him as speaker of the House in that final term.

The year 1917 marked a culmination of a political crisis surrounding Governor James Edward Ferguson, a controversial leader because of his anti-Prohibition politics, who was accused of poor administration and misappropriation of state funds. Ferguson had angered many in the Legislature when he began a private war on the University of Texas at Austin, which he considered an arrogant and unresponsive institution. Ferguson preferred to reduce university funding in order to spend more money on public schools.

Ferguson overreached, however, when he vetoed the entire university budget in May 1917. This sparked a fierce backlash in the state House and Senate. Fuller, a Prohibitionist and therefore already a foe of the "wet" governor, called for a special legislative session to investigate the financial charges against Ferguson and to consider impeachment of the embattled governor. The speaker of the House, of course, held no constitutional authority to call for a special session, but his action increased momentum for a confrontation between the state's legislative and executive branches. Hoping to head off more intense opposition, Ferguson called a special session himself.

Fuller testified against Ferguson during the heated hearings in August 1917. The House approved twenty-one articles of impeachment, which were forwarded to the Senate. The Senate found Ferguson guilty on ten counts and the governor resigned. The Senate furthered ruled that Jim Ferguson himself would be disqualified for the rest of his life from holding public office in Texas, thus prompting later gubernatorial races by his wife, Miriam "Ma" Ferguson.

Following his speakership, Fuller served in the Texas National Guard and earned the rank of captain in the United States Army Judge Advocate Department during the First World War. He moved to Houston in 1920, where he practiced law until he died August 9, 1934.

University Materials Related to Speaker Fuller

Books:

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1973.

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical File: Fuller, F. O. (Center for American History)

Contains two items: an article headlined "Who's Who in Texas and Why?" from a 1917 edition of the Austin American that provides a brief biographical sketch of Fuller; and a one sentence notice of Fuller's funeral in Houston, "Former Speaker Dies," from the August 10, 1934, San Antonio Light.

Top


ROBERT EWING THOMASON
(1879–1973)
46th Speaker
(1919–1921)

Presided over

The 36th Legislature's regular session, January 14 to March 19, 1919; the 36th Legislature's 1st called session, May 5 to May 9, 1919; the 36h Legislature's 2nd called session, June 23 to July 22, 1919; the 36th Legislature's 3rd called session, May 20 to June 18, 1920; and the 36th Legislature's 4th called session, September 21 to October 2, 1920.

Born in Rover, Bedford County, Tennessee, on May 30, 1879, Robert Ewing Thomason moved with his family to Era, Texas, when Thomason was one. Thomason enrolled in Southwestern University at Georgetown in 1896, graduating two years later. He earned a law degree from the University of Texas in 1900 and began a private practice in Gainesville. Elected district attorney and then Cooke County attorney in 1902, Thomason returned to his private practice after a second two-year term. Contracting malaria, he re-settled with his wife in El Paso in 1912.

From there, Thomason won election to the Texas House of Representatives in 1916 and 1918. Like his predecessor as speaker, F.O. Fuller, Thomas was a Prohibitionist and already inclined to oppose Gov. James Ferguson. Thomason served on the committee that investigated financial improprieties by the Ferguson administration and recommended counts of impeachment to the full House. The Senate later convicted Ferguson, resulting in his removal from office.

Thomason backed Texas' first workers' compensation law and helped steer the creation of the state's Highway Commission to passage. Thomason proved a strong supporter of women's voting rights, supporting in his first House term a law to allow women to vote in state primaries. During his second term, his peers chose him as speaker of the House. Thomason presided over the House during the 36th session in which the chamber ratified the woman's suffrage amendment to the United States Constitution.

Thomason entered the gubernatorial race in 1920, but finished third behind Joseph W. Bailey and Pat Neff, with Neff, a former speaker, prevailing in the runoff. Thomason then returned to El Paso and resumed his law practice, before winning election as mayor of the city in 1927. Under his leadership, El Paso's first airport was constructed.

In 1930, he won a seat in the United States House in a congressional district that stretched from San Angelo and Del Rio to El Paso and was at that time the largest in the country. Serving on the Military Affairs Committee, he became a major Congressional patron of Fort Bliss, which grew substantially under his tenure.

Thomason won re-election thirteen times and he guided bills to build Red Bluff Dam and to create Big Bend National Park. He also was floor leader on the bill that started the selective service system just before World War II. Though he supported much of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal program, he remained an avowed segregationist, and battled against a federal anti-lynching bill and the Fair Employment Practice Committee bill that aimed at reducing discrimination in the workplace.

President Harry S. Truman appointed Thomason to a federal district bench. He served as judge from 1947 to 1963, retiring just after his eighty-fourth birthday. He died on November 5, 1973.

University Materials Related to Speaker Thomason

Books:

Progressives and prohibitionists: Texas Democrats in the Wilson era. Written by Lewis L. Gould. Austin, University of Texas Press, 1973.

JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 2
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 3
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 4
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 5
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 6
JK 2318 T4 1973 PCL Stacks Copy 7
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
JK 2318 T4 1973 Public Affairs Library

Thomason: the autobiography of a Federal judge. Edited and annotated by Joseph M. Ray. El Paso, Texas Western Press, 1971.

TZZ 976.409 T368B1 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
LAW KF 373 T52 R3 Law Library Copy 1
LAW KF 373 T52 R3 Law Library Rare Books Copy 2. Use in library only.

Thomason; The Autobiography of a Federal Judge. Written by Robert Ewing Thomason. Edited and annotated by Joseph M. Ray. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1971. Edited, cut, and revised from an autobiography written in 1952: The saga of Era.

TZZ 976.409 T368B1 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
LAW KF 373 T52 R3 Law Library Copy 1
LAW KF 373 T52 R3 Law Library Rare Books Copy 2. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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CHARLES GRAHAM THOMAS
(1879–1937)
47th Speaker
(1921–1923)

Presided over

The 37th Legislature's regular session, January 11 to March 12, 1921; the 37th Legislature's 1st called session, July 18 to August 16, 1921; and the 37th Legislature's 2nd Called session, August 17 to August 25, 1921.

Born on December 10, 1879, in Richardson, Texas, Charles Graham Thomas moved with his family at age 10 to Lewisville in Denton County. Thomas graduated from Baylor University in 1898. Thomas lived almost his entire adult life in Lewisville, with the exception of two years spent in Cleburne.

Running a lumber business until 1914, he then launched a career as a real estate broker and insurance man. Serving as chair of the Lewisville Baptist Church and president of the Denton County Baptist Association, Thomas's network of contacts in the community led to the launch of his political career, with the Democrat winning a seat in the Texas House of Representatives in 1917.

During his first term, Thomas won appointment to the key House Appropriations Committee. Attaching himself to Progressivism, Thomas supported women's suffrage and Prohibition. By his second term he was already Appropriation Committee chair and by 1921 his peers had selected him speaker of the House.

Thomas announced that he hoped to increase financial support of the public schools, improve Texas roads, and provide incentives to increase manufacturing in Texas. Unfortunately, Thomas and the rest of the Legislature found itself deadlocked in opposition to much of Gov. Pat Neff's agenda and Thomas's session produced little memorable legislation. The speaker, who had a blind daughter, did hammer out a budget that, for the first time, provided funding for a circulation library of Braille books within the state. A new banking law allowed Texans to realize higher interest on their deposits.

Following his speakership, Thomas went back into private business until 1935, when he was named to head the Depression-era Texas Relief Commission. Thomas, by 1937, had been named to the state Board of Control, but was forced to resign because of declining health. He died on February 14, 1937, in Van Alstyne after suffering a stroke.

University Materials Related to Speaker Thomas

Books:

Hood, bonnet, and little brown jug: Texas politics, 1921–1928. Written by Norman D. Brown. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, c1984.

F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 3
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 4
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID. Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.

History of Texas; Fort Worth and the Texas northwest edition. Edited by Capt. Buckley B. Paddock. Chicago and New York: The Lewis Publishing co., 1922.

F 386 P225 V.2 PCL Stacks
F 386 P225 V.3 PCL Stacks
F 386 P225 V.4 PCL Stacks
TZ 976.4 P131H V.1 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 976.4 P131H V.2 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 976.4 P131H V.3 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
TZ 976.4 P131H V.4 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
T976.4 P131H V.1 Center for American History. Use in library only.
T976.4 P131H V.2 Center for American History. Use in library only.
T976.4 P131H V.3 Center for American History. Use in library only.
T976.4 P131H V.4 Center for American History. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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RICHARD ERNEST SEAGLER
(1883–1956)
48th Speaker
(1923–1925)

Presided over

The 38th Legislature's regular session, January 9 to March 14, 1923; the 38th Legislature's 1st called session, March 15, 1923; the 38th Legislature's 2nd called session, April 16 to May 15, 1923; and the 38th Legislature's 3rd called session, May 16 to June 14, 1923.

Born in Tennessee Colony in Anderson County, Texas, on December 3, 1883, Richard Ernest Seagler graduated from North Texas State Normal College (now called the University of North Texas) at Denton and in 1912 finished his law degree at the University of Texas.

Settling in Palestine, he started his career as a trial attorney, and was first elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1918, winning re-election in 1920 and 1922. Seagler served on the House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee and was vice chair of the Rules Committee. In 1923 his House peers selected him as speaker during a legislative session that created a state parks board, set the first speed limits for automobiles, and established Texas Technological College (now Texas Tech University) in Lubbock.

Seagler left the Legislature in 1924 to serve as assistant state attorney general. In 1925 he became an attorney for the Humble Oil and Refining Company (now Exxon-Mobil), heading the trial division by 1929 and becoming the corporation's general attorney by 1938. He retired in from the company in 1948 to start his own private practice in Houston, where he died on January 6, 1956.

University Materials Related to Speaker Seagler

Books:

History of Humble Oil & Refining Company. Written by Henrietta M. Larson and Kenneth Wiggins Porter. New York: Arno Press, reprint, 1976; c1959.

HD 9569 H8 L3 1976 PCL Stacks
HD 9569 H8 L3 1976 PCL Stacks
HD 9569 H8 L3 1976 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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ROBERT LEE SATTERWHITE
(1871–1959)
49th Speaker
(1925–1927)

Presided over

The 39th Legislature's regular session, January 13 to March 19, 1925; and the 39th Legislature's first called session, September 13 to October 8, 1926.

Born in Nevada County, Arkansas, on January 28, 1871, Robert Lee Satterwhite first moved to Texas in 1885, his parents establishing a household in Freestone County in the eastern part of the state. As a youth, Satterwhite worked at various jobs, including as a farm laborer and printer. In 1893, he established the Wortham Signal newspaper. He alternated between his newspaper career and farming until he signed up with the United States Army to fight in the Spanish-American War.

Returning home after the war, Satterwhite first won election to the Texas House of Representatives in 1900 representing Freestone County. After his one term, he temporarily left politics and farmed in Knox County just south of the Texas Panhandle until 1909 when he moved further west to Tulia in Swisher County. There, in 1913, he established the short-lived Tulia Enterprise. Satterwhite moved again, this time to the nearby town of Panhandle in Carson County.

While living in Panhandle, he won election once again to the state House, 18 years after he completed his first term. Elected in 1919 and 1921, he represented Carson and other counties. He re-located to Amarillo in 1923, and represented that city in the House from 1923 to 1929. It was during the second of those three terms that Satterwhite won the speakership in a hotly contested race that lasted six ballots. During his speakership, the Legislature completed a comprehensive revision of the state's civil statutes.

Never settled for long, Satterwhite moved to Odessa after his final term as a representative from Amarillo, and became a rancher. It was from Odessa that Satterwhite served his final stint as a lawmaker, winning election to the House one last time in 1931. He remained in Austin after that term ended, remaining there for 15 years. He made two unsuccessful attempts at a political comeback, first in a failed 1944 race for lieutenant governor, and then in a 1946 race for the House of Representatives. Satterwhite never again returned to politics. Moving one last time, he settled in Houston in 1947, spending the last 12 years of his life there before his death on November 29, 1959 at the age of 88.

University Materials Related to Speaker Satterwhite

Books:

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

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ROBERT LEE BOBBITT
(1888–1972)
50th Speaker
(1927–1929)

Presided over

The 40th Legislature's regular session, January 11 to March 16, 1927; and the 40th Legislature's first called session, May 9 to June 7, 1927.

Born on January 24, 1888 near Hillsboro in North Central Texas' Hill County, Robert Lee Bobbitt enrolled at Carlisle Military Academy in Arlington at age 22, later receiving a teaching certificate from North Texas State Normal College in Denton. Bobbitt, however, never taught but instead entered law school at The University of Texas in 1912. He worked his way through three years of study and emerged in 1915 as president of his law class. After receiving his degree, he began practicing law in Laredo.

Bobbitt set aside his career plans temporarily to serve in the Army during World War I. Although he never saw combat duty, he worked as a soldiers' defense counsel and was discharged as a captain in 1919. Bobbitt resumed practicing law up his return to Laredo and served on the State Democratic Committee from 1920 to 1922.

He first won election to the state House of Representatives in 1922. Bobbitt aligned himself with the anti-Ferguson forces in the Democratic Party, fighting to block a bill granting amnesty and restoring full political rights to impeached former Gov. Jim Ferguson, a law that passed the Legislature during Gov. Miriam "Ma" Ferguson's administration from 1925–1927. Bobbitt rose to the chairmanship of the House Judiciary Committee before claiming the speakership in 1927. Under Bobbitt's leadership, the House reformed the state appeals court system and passed a law repealing the earlier political amnesty granted Ferguson. While serving his last days as speaker, Bobbitt won election as district attorney in Webb County. The next year, Governor Dan Moody appointed him to fill the vacant office of state attorney general. Bobbitt, however, failed to win the office in his own right in November 1930 when he was defeated in a race for a full term by future governor James Allred.

Bobbitt resettled in San Antonio, and at one point served as associate justice of the Fourth Court of Civil Appeals. He later was a member of the state Highway Commission and chaired the Board of Directors of Texas A&I College. He died in San Antonio on September 14, 1972 at the age of 84.

University Materials Related to Speaker Bobbitt

Books:

Hood, bonnet, and little brown jug: Texas politics, 1921–1928. Written by Norman D. Brown. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, c1984.

F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 2
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 3
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks Copy 4
F 391 B847 1984 PCL Stacks
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History. Use in library only.
F 391 B847 1984 Center for American History TXC-ZZ Collection. Use in library only.
Internet access limited to users with UT Austin EID. Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1982. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 1982.

JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy 2. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1982 Center for American History Copy. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1982 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1991. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Texas House of Representatives, 1991.

JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History. Use in library only.
JK 4830 P737 1991 Center for American History TXC-Z Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1991 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–1995. Prepared by the staff of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: Published by the Council, 1995.

JK 4866 T48 1995 PCL Stacks
JK 4866 T48 1995 Center for American History. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 1995 Law Library

Presiding officers of the Texas Legislature, 1846–2002. Prepared by the Research Division of the Texas Legislative Council. Austin, Tex.: The Council, 2002.

TXDOC L1400.5 P926O 2002 Center for American History Reference Collection. Use in library only.
LAW JK 4866 P73 2002 Law Library

Vertical Files:

Vertical File (1): Bobbitt, Robert Lee (Center for American History)

Contains newspaper clippings that focus on his career as Texas attorney general, his activities as president of the University of Texas at Austin's Ex-Students Association, his involvement in Texas' dispute with the federal government over control of the Tidelands, his comments as a member of the Texas Highway Commission and president of the Western Association of State Highway Officials, and a September 17, 1972, story from the Houston Chronicle, "Former Attorney General Robert L. Bobbitt Buried," that describes his funeral in San Antonio.

The file also contains a typed copy of Bobbitt's statement before the Texas Senate Investigating Committee on November 27, 1944, "The Tragedy at the University of Texas" in which Bobbitt criticizes the firing of the university president Homer P. Rainey by the school's board of regents.

Vertical File (2): Bobbitt, Robert Lee, Jr. (Center for American History)

Contains a single July 22, 1945, clipping from the Dallas Morning News that describes the marriage of Bobbitt's son to Elizabeth Calhoun.

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