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Texas Revolution Resources - detail di_00179 Crockett at the Alamo

Texas Revolution Resources

(updated 9-4-2009)

Selected Publications, Archives, and Manuscript Collections

Index:

Manuscript Collections

Maps

Newspapers and Periodicals

Brazoria, Texas
Houston, Texas
Nacogdoches, Texas
General Reference Index

Publications

General
Biographies Campaigns Causes
Finance
Law and Legislation - Mexico
Law and Legislation - United States/Texas
Velasco, Treaty of
Military Affairs
Personal Narratives

Vertical Files

Manuscript Collections

General

William B. Aldridge Letters, 1836–1837. (3 items.)
Family correspondence, including Aldridge’s discussion of the Texas Revolution and his impressions of cultural affairs, government, military affairs, politics, and social affairs in Texas.

Samuel Tabor Allen Family Papers, 1759–1931. (3 in.)

Papers document Allen's personal, business, and political activities in Texas during the pre-Republic and Revolutionary period. The papers also contain materials concerning other Allen family members including: 70 letters from Caleb J. Allen, Jr., Allen's nephew, who served as a Union Army soldier in the Civil War; business and legal records of the Caleb J. Allen family, merchants in New London, Connecticut; correspondence of Stephen Haley Allen, 1896–1930; scrapbook materials pertaining to Frederick W. Abbott, elocutionist and actor, who was related to the Allen family by marriage.

Juan Nepomuceno Almonte Papers, 1834–1865. (3 in.)

Photostats of the account of Santa Anna's Texas campaign from February 1 to April 16, 1836, derived from the journal of Almonte and published in the New York Herald April 12 through July 1, 1836. Also included are: a retranslation of the journal into Spanish; notes on Almonte; a summary translation of Almonte's "Report on Texas, 1834"; and a volume of letters, mostly in French, from Almonte to Maximilian and others (1862–1865) concerning Almonte's service as president of the Mexican Assembly of Notables and as envoy to France.

Harriet Moore Page Potter Ames Reminiscences, undated. (1 vol.)

Memoirs of the era of the Texas Revolution and the Republic of Texas by Mrs. Ames, then the wife of Robert Potter, Secretary of the Texas Navy. Microfilm holdings include Samuel K. Lewis and Edward McGinnis v. Charles Ames and Harriet Ames.

Pedro de Ampudia Letter, 1836. (1 item.)

Letter from Ampudia, May 2, 1836, commander of retreating Mexican forces, to Erasmo Sequín, with reply May 3, from Juan Sequín, advance commander of the Texas forces. Ampudia's letter informs Erasmo Sequin that he is unaware of any slaves or stolen property nearby. Juan Sequín's reply assures that the Mexicans will not be attacked.

John C. Amsler Papers, 1891. (1 vol.)

Biographical sketches of Mary Loewenberger Amsler and Charles Conrad Amsler, settlers in Austin's Colony who helped found Cat Spring, Texas.

Juan José de Andrade Items, 1836. (2 items.)

Documents published by Juan José de Andrade about the evacuation of San Antonio de Béjar, translation.

Alfred B. Anzaldua Essay, 1991. (1 item.)

Literary production entitled "Captain J. J. Sanders and Ranger Abuse of Power on the Texas-Mexico Border, 1910–1920," written by Anzaldua for a graduate history course, concerns the incidence of abuse of Mexican and Mexican-American citizens along the border by Texas Rangers.

Samuel Erson Asbury Papers, 1920–1955. (3 ft.)

Papers consist of historical research materials collected by Asbury to document the Texas Revolution and other facets of Texas's past as well as the lives of early Texans. Included is genealogical material on Asbury's family and reference notes for a proposed musical drama about Texas.

Moses and Stephen Fuller Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. (9 ft., 6 in.)

The Austin Papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin, documenting an era in Texas history marked by increased Anglo colonization, strained relations with the Mexican government, the Texas Revolution, and eventually the founding of the Republic of Texas. See also The Austin Papers, ed. by Eugene C. Barker. Washington D.C.: USGPO, 1924–1928

William T. Austin Narrative, 1835. (3 items.)

William Tennant Austin, soldier and civil servant of the Republic of Texas, was born on January 30, 1809, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the son of Susan (Rogers) and John Punderson Austin. Narrative is an account of his campaign of 1835.

Moseley Baker Letter, 1844. (1 vol.)

Transcription made in 1894 of an 1844 letter intended for publication written by Baker (1802–1848), a captain in the Texan army at San Jacinto, to Sam Houston giving Baker's perspective on the battle and events leading up to it and highly unfavorable to Houston.

Eugene Campbell Barker Papers, 1785 (1812–1959). (19 ft.)

Papers produced by Barker (1874–1956), University of Texas historian and educator relate to the development of the Texas State Historical Association, the American Historical Association, and other learned societies; scholarly research and publication; teaching at the university; national historical affairs; Barker's consideration of academic freedom, tenure, and the administration of The University of Texas; his studies of the Fredonian Rebellion, Texas finances (1835–1836), Houston and the 1836 Campaign, miscellaneous data and sources in Texas history, Mexican Army and Mexican sources, Goliad and the Tampico Expedition, Texas-Mexican relations (1827–1834), causes of the Texas Revolution; letters concerning the writings of Sam Houston; transcriptions of documents concerning the Alamo, James Walker Fannin, Jr., James Grant, Francis W. Johnson, and William B. Travis; Stephen F. Austin; Anglo-American settlement in Texas; Austin's Colony; Austin in Mexico; Declaration of Independence; establishment of the Republic of Texas, civil government, land speculation, and nonmilitary events of 1836; native Latin American contributions to the colonization and independence of Texas; Texas relations with Great Britain, France, and Europe; William Barker family notes; Frederick Jackson Turner notes; miscellaneous notes on state banks, Virginia Convention of 1788, economic interpretation of the Constitution, the judiciary and slavery, Velasco, East Texas, expulsion of John Bradburn, Convention of 1833, homestead law in Texas, Mexia Expedition, religion, Peter Grayson, and impressions suggested by Sam Houston's writings; and records of Barker's major publications. The papers contain correspondence, speeches, lecture notes, research notes, literary productions, class records, scrapbooks, and photographs.

Joseph Henry Barnard Papers, 1836–1860, 1949–1982. (.5 in.)

Papers of Barnard (1804–1861),a surgeon who served with Col. James W. Fannin during the Texas Revolution in 1836, include Barnard's annotated list of men under the command of Fannin at Goliad. Barnard was captured with Fannin's forces, but his life was spared so he could treat wounded Mexicans. An 1844 list of members of the Eighth Congress of the Republic of Texas (1843–1844) relates to Barnard's term as a representative for Fort Bend County, and a ledger concerns his ranching activities in Goliad County. Printed material relates to Barnard, his family, and the history of Goliad.

F. A. Bass Collection, 1836, 1863, 1870. (9 items.)

Includes Army orders, 1836; Army letters, Thomas J. Rusk and Samuel Houston to Wylie Martin, 1836; Letters by William C. Quantrill and others: 1863 and 1870.

Valentine Bennet Papers, 1842–1898. (1 vol.)

A letter and photostats of reminiscences and newspaper clippings concern activities of Bennet (1780–1843), quartermaster of the Texas Army and participant in the Texas Santa Fe Expedition and the Somervell Expedition during the Texas Republic era.

John Sowers Brooks Letters, 1834–1856. (39 items.)

Letters written by Brooks (1814–1836), soldier, to members of his family and an acquaintance, as well as correspondence between members of the family and acquaintances of Brooks after the latter's death in the Goliad Massacre. Brooks's letters telÏ of his trips, his service in the United States Marine Corps, ravages of Asiatic cholera, his service as adjutant and aid to James Walker Fannin, Jr., during the Matamoros Expedition and at Goliad. These writings express sentiments of volunteer soldiers and portray their activities in the fight for Texas independence. The later correspondence concerns the death of Brooks at Goliad and attempts by his family to locate his personal effects, secure the land awarded him as a soldier in the Texas Revolution, and settle his estate. There is a typescript calendar of materials relating to Brooks, including these letters.

John Henry Brown Papers, 1691–1951. (28 ft.)

Journalist, military hero, politician, and historian, served as mayor of Dallas (1885–1887) and authored several books on the history of Texas, Dallas and Dallas County, and Mexico. Materials related to the family and career of Brown include papers accumulated in connection with his historical writings and others produced by family members. Correspondence, notes, drafts, and other materials relate to his Indian Wars and Pioneers of Texas and six other books.

Guy Morrison Bryan Papers, 1838–1901. (3 ft.)

Collection concerns the career of Bryan (1821–1901), nephew of Stephen F. Austin, and deals with his education; his friendship with Rutherford B. Hayes; his service as state legislator and United States congressman; his activities during the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, and the Civil War; his ranching enterprises and participation in the establishment of the Texas Cotton Bureau as well as the Texas Veteran Association and the Texas State Historical Association; and his personal and family life.

Moses Austin Bryan Papers, 1824–1897, 1926. (1 ft., 6 in.)

Papers of Bryan (1817–1895), soldier, postmaster, and county commissioner, relate to his activities as secretary to his uncle Stephen F. Austin, secretary of the Texas legation to the United States in 1839, major in the Civil War, and organizer and secretary of the Texas Veteran Association. Included are Bryan's recollections of Austin and of the Texas Revolution and following events and petitions for admission to the Texas Veteran Association detailing the service of the applicants. In addition there is a letter from Aaron Burr (1832) to Jane McManus concerning her proposed colonization project and enclosing a letter of introduction to Judge Workman in New Orleans with the request that he introduce her to Stephen F. Austin.

Edward Burleson, Sr. Papers, 1835–1853, 1922. (19 items.)

Correspondence, deeds, legal documents, and article of agreement concern the career of Burleson (1793–1851), member of Stephen Fuller Austin’s second colony; military commander at San Jacinto, in the Cherokee War, and during the Mexican War; and politician who served as vice president of the Republic of Texas (1841) and state senator (1846–1851). Papers relate to the Texan military activities before and during 1836, the Cherokee War, the Mexican War, and slave transactions. Four items are original documents, the rest are copies.

David Gouverneur Burnet Papers, 1798–1965. (1 ft., 7 in.)

Papers pertain to the career of Burnet (1789–1870), president ad interim of the Republic of Texas and later secretary of state of the Republic and of the state of Texas, and contain information about his early attempts at colonization in Texas as well as the events that transpired during his days in public office. Included is his handling of the Santa Anna affair, his feud with Sam Houston, and his concerns about statehood, the judiciary, and the Indian question as well as personal correspondence between Burnet and his brothers. In addition the collection contains a substantial file of documents concerning the early colonization efforts of Moses and Stephen F. Austin.

Robert L. Cartwright Narratives, ca. 1919. (2 items.)

Two historical narratives by Cartwright (b. 1860) of Waco, grandson of Matthew Cartwright of San Augustine: a brief history of Texas to the end of the Republic entitled The Earliest American History of Texas (2 copies); and “The Reason Why General Sam Houston Left His First Wife.”

Jane McManus Storms Cazneau Papers, 1834–1836, 1877–1878, 1919. (1 vol.)

Papers consist of photostats of letters written by Cazneau (1807–1878) in 1834–1836 concerning land and loans to aid the Texas struggle for independence as well as typescripts of documents relating to her death aboard a ship that foundered in 1878. Also included are letters from Jane Cazneau to M. S. Beach between 1849 and 1865, as well as a copy of her will.

Ann Raney Thomas Coleman Papers, 1849–1892. (3 vols.)

Letters and reminiscences concern the life of Coleman (1810–1897) and relate to life in England, trip to America, life in the United States, experiences in the Texas Revolution, the Runaway Scrape, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Robert Morris Coleman Papers, 1837, 1841, 1934, 1940. (4 items.)

Transcript of a pamphlet, “Houston Displayed; or, Who Won the Battle of San Jacinto?” by Coleman (1799–1838), soldier and signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, contains a negative account of Sam Houston’s actions in the Texas Revolution. Also included are letters and criticism of the pamphlet.

Francis Collins Papers, 1826–1871. (5 in.)

Papers concern the military career of Collins (1820–1882), artillery officer in the Mexican War, and include his letters from West Point (1842–1844), his journal and reminiscences about the war, and family correspondence to Isaac Clinton Collins, student and teacher in New York.

Convention of 1836 Resolution, March 1836. (1 item.)

Resolution that was passed at the Convention of 1836 appointed a committee of one from each municipality to draft a constitution for Texas. The name of Mr. (Robert) Potter is noted on this resolution.

Tura Compton Cressey Narrative, 1932. (1 vol.)

Biographical sketch of Samuel May Williams (1795–1858), secretary of Austin’s Colony, by his great-granddaughter Cressey.

Paul C. Crusemann Collection, (1788–1898) 1932. (10 in.)

The bulk of the collection consists of unrelated items having to do with the affairs of Elisha Marshall Pease, Texas governor from 1853 to 1857, and his wife Lucadia Christiana Niles Pease. Included also is a significant collection of historical documents, such as a letter from George Washington, an original copy of the public Treaty of Velasco, other notable papers from the time of the Texas Revolution and the Republic of Texas, Pease's diary for October 1836 to January 1837 with a summary of his later activities, and an extensive autograph collection.

Harbert Davenport Papers, 1800 (1835–1836) 1923. (3 ft. 2 in.)

Research materials collected by Davenport (1882–1957), Brownsville attorney and historian, document the political and military events connected with James Walker Fannin, Jr., and the military units and persons under his command, in the Goliad Campaigns. Materials consist of copies of correspondence, notes, historical narratives, reminiscences, biographical sketches, muster rolls and rosters, military, legal, and governmental records. Included also are a biographical sketch of James B. Wells (1850–1923), a Brownsville attorney and Davenport's law associate, and material dealing with litigation (1920–1921) concerning the Ojo de Agua, Karnes County stream.

Adina Emilia de Zavala Papers, 1766 (1831–1955). (33 ft. 6 in.)

Papers concern the activities of De Zavala (1861–1955) as a founder of the De Zavala Chapter of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (1893) and its efforts to preserve and administer the Alamo; as a founder of the Texas Historical and Landmarks Association (1912) and its preservation activities for historic sites in Texas, particularly San Antonio's Spanish Governor’s Palace and the Spanish missions; as a charter member and officer of the Texas Historical Association; as a member of the Texas Historical Board and the Texas Centennial Committee; as collector and writer of Texana; and as a devout Roman Catholic. Collection also contains papers relating to members of the De Zavala family and their property, particularly to Adina's brother Augustine and his military service in the Spanish-American War; a diary of Rev. Edmond John Peter Schmidt; land titles record books for Bexar County, 1875–1882; and correspondence registry for military posts in Texas (1852, 1860–1861). Materials include correspondence, literary productions, speeches, research notes, page proofs, account and record books, financial and legal documents, newspaper clippings, plats and maps, scrapbooks, photographs, and lithographic prints.

Lorenzo de Zavala Papers, 1818–1936. (4 in.)

The papers deal with the political career of Zavala who was intimately concerned with the independence movement in Mexico and, later, in Texas. Included is Zavala's political correspondence with the leading figures of the day, including especially Antonio López de Santa Anna and José Antonio Mexia, as well as financial and legal documents, which involve in part Zavala's land grant and his colonization efforts. In addition the collection contains a manuscript of an article written by Zavala on Mayan ruins and biographical and genealogical information about the Zavala family.

Philip Dimmitt Papers, 1833–1849, 1879, 1904. (1 in.)

Papers concern Dimmitt (1801–1841), trader, merchant, and soldier in the Texas Revolution, consist of Photostats of letters in Spanish to Dimmitt from Ramón Músquiz, political chief of Béxar (1827–1835), about land and mercantile matters; one from Sam Houston in 1837 concerning supplies for the army; military records of Texan forces from November 1835 to January 1836 while under Dimmitt’s command at Goliad; material relating to Dimmitt’s estate and the genealogy of the Dimmitt family including a letter from John Sutherland to the administrator concerning property and notes taken when he and Dimmitt were captured by Mexican troops on Corpus Christi Bay in 1841; and an 1879 letter relating to the Greenback Party.

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Many documents of great significance to the history of Texas can be found in the Eberstadt Collection. Among them are: a number of early Spanish documents, of which those relating to Father Margil and the development of the missions as well as autographed royal documents and censuses are of particular interest; items having to do with Austin's Colony and other colonization endeavors, the Revolution, and the Republic including the autographed English version of the Convention of 1833 Memorial; a number of headrights, deeds, land grants, and title books; early records of various kinds from twenty-two Texas counties; and some early documentation of the oil industry, though in this case only peripherally pertaining to Texas. Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
Convention of 1833 Memorial
Fannin (James Walker) Letter
General Council Circular
General Council Ordinance
Gilbert (Charles E., Sr.) Papers
Hill (H. R. M.) Letter
Land Law Document Excerpts
Tamaulipas (Mexico) Items
Tulancingo (Mexico) Tax Levy
Williams (Samuel May) Letter

Haden Edwards Papers, 1836–1838. (2 items.)

Papers include an article of agreement between Edwards (1771–1849), empresario and soldier, and the firm of Kaufman & Gould concerning a land suit; and a letter of authorization from the Nacogdoches Vigilance Committee to raise troops in the United States to aid the Texas Revolution.

Hermann Ehrenberg Narrative, 1845. (1 item.)

Narrative by Ehrenberg (ca. 1818–1866) entitled Fahrten und Schicksale eines Deutschen in Texas [Travels and Fortunes of a German in Texas] was published in Germany in 1845 and was the third edition of his book which first appeared in 1843 as Texas und seine Revolution. In it, he recounts his adventures as a soldier in the Texas Revolution including his escape from the Goliad Massacre.

George Bernard Erath Family Papers, 1829–1967. (8 in.)

Papers concern the history of the Erath family and include correspondence, legal papers, land grants, account books, newspaper clippings, photographs, and literary productions pertaining to the careers of George Bernard Erath (1813–1891), pioneer, politician, soldier, and surveyor, and his daughter Lucy A. Erath (1857–1948). The manuscript and typescript of Erath's memoirs concerning his immigration to Texas, his participation in the Revolution, his surveying activities during The Republic, and his service in the Texas Legislature are included.

Vicente Filisola Papers, ca. 1763–1840. (2 vol.)

Military officer with the Mexican forces during the Texas Revolution, Filisola was responsible for the withdrawal of Mexico’s forces after Santa Anna was captured at San Jacinto. The volumes in these papers include his account of the war and his self-defense during his court martial.

Madge Williams Hearne Collection, 1817–1853. (4 in.)

Papers collected by Madge Williams Hearne, the granddaughter of Sam Houston, consist mostly of unrelated letters written to Sam Houston and others by many important historical figures especially during the revolutionary period in Texas (1835–1836) and the years of the Republic of Texas (1836–1846). Included are photocopies not only of some of these original documents but also of many others that are likewise mostly related to the Texas Revolution and Republic. Another series is made up of photostats partially reflecting this collection of originals but also containing other letters, many written by Sam Houston himself especially during his early years. Sam Houston's papers were divided among various members of the family and now make up several collections in various locations.

Sam Houston Hearne Collection, 1820–1929. (11 in.)

Collection of Sam Houston Hearne, great-grandson of Sam Houston, consists primarily of Houston family correspondence, letters sent and received by Houston during and directly after the Texas Revolution and during his Texas presidency, and correspondence between Houston and Guy M. Bryan concerning Stephen F. Austin.

Mary Austin Holley Papers, 1808–1846. (1 ft., 3 in.)

Correspondence, diary, notes and literary productions relate to Mary Austin Holley's life in Connecticut, Louisiana, Kentucky and Texas, and the history of Texas. Also included is the last will and testament of Stephen F. Austin, 1833.

Sam Houston Papers, 1814 (1836–1861) 1937. (6 ft., 5 in.)

Papers document the life of Sam Houston, including military service, as congressman from and governor of Tennessee, as commander-in-chief of the army in the Texas Revolution, as president of the Republic of Texas, as United States senator from and governor of the state of Texas. Many important state and national figures, especially Andrew Jackson, are represented, as well as personal friends and family members.

Francis White Johnson Papers. (2 ft., 6 in.)

Autobiographical statements, narratives, and notes relating to the history of Texas and to the career of Johnson, surveyor, soldier, historian. Papers were written and collected by Johnson and were edited and published by E. C. Barker and E. W. Winkler as the five-volume work entitled History of Texas and Texans (published 1914).

Louis Lenz Collection, 1688–1966. (8 ft., 1 in.)

Materials collected by Lenz (1885–1967) after his retirement as civil engineer in 1951 concern the early history of Texas and its settlement, particularly by the Canary Islanders in San Antonio and the Germans in South Texas; the Texas Revolution; and the Texas Republic. Significant features of the collection are letters from notable persons in Texas history, family papers and government records of settlers, a daily diary of the Confederate tax collector in Victoria (1862–1864), and ledgers from several business establishments in Cuero. Other materials included are financial and legal records, literary productions, certificates, deeds, land grants, guest register from the Muti Hotel in Cuero (1880–1883), speeches, photographs, and newspaper clippings. There are also calendars compiled by Lenz for some of the materials and a card index for the collection. Many documents are in German and Spanish, some of the latter with English translations. Some materials are photostatic copies.

Matamoros Archives, 1811–1859.

Documents dating from 1811 to 1822 relate to royal administration of México during the Independence period. Included are decrees and orders from viceroys and other officials in México and Spain. Documents dating from 1823 deal with administrative issues in México. Refugio, Matamoros, and Ciudad Victoria figure prominently in these papers. Included are numerous types of lists of citizens of each of these locations. These archives also contain incomplete runs of several different newspapers, including El Mercurio de Matamoros (1836), Atalaya (1836), El Restaurador de Tamaulipas (1833), La Columna de la Constitución (1833), El Argos (1833), El Telégrafo (1833), and La Demócrata (1833). This subcollection includes a calendar that lists all items in the collection.

Aurelia Hadley Mohl Essays, 1894. (1 vol.)

Journalist and writer, Mohl was the author of Women of the Texas Republic and Revolution, a series of biographical sketches commissioned for a history textbook but not published. This collection contains those unpublished essays.

Colgate Dye Van Pradelles Donaldson Moore Papers, 1806–1838, 1860. (28 items.)

Papers concern the career and family of Moore (d. 1838?), widow of William Donaldson and later widow of William Moore. Included are correspondence, legal papers, and receipts relating to land transactions, court claims to land grants in Florida, the settlement of estates, and the importation of arms for the Texas Revolution.

James Franklin and Stephen Samuel Perry Papers, 1785–1942. (13 ft., 9 in.)

Papers of Perry and his son Stephen Samuel Perry and their extended families cover significant events in Texas history from the early years of colonization up to the twentieth century. Collection relates to Stephen F. Austin's land holdings, James Franklin Perry's mercantile business and other family-related business enterprises; the establishment and operation of Peach Point Plantation, and the daily concerns of paternalistic slaveholders who found it difficult to make ends meet raising cotton, corn, and sugar; to educate their children where there were no public schools; and to handle chronic health problems. The papers accentuate the contrast between life in various sections of the United States since the Perrys traveled for business, health reasons, and pleasure; attended schools in Ohio, Connecticut, Virginia; and corresponded with and visited relatives in the northeast as well as Ohio, Iowa, and Missouri.

Republic of Texas General File, 1835–1845.

Correspondence, legal documents, newspaper articles and military documents relate to life in the Republic of Texas, annexation, and military affairs. Included are letters from soldiers in the Revolutionary army, second hand accounts of the siege of the Alamo, a letter from Alamo defender Daniel William Cloud, and travel descriptions of Texas, Louisiana, Illinois and Missouri.

Samuel C. A. Rogers Reminiscences, 1891. (1 item.)

Reminiscences of Samuel C. A. Rogers (1810–1892), Methodist clergyman, farmer, soldier. Reminiscences relate to Rogers’ childhood; fighting in the Texas Revolution and against Indians; battle at Plum Creek; Texas experiences between 1831 and 1840.

Thomas Jefferson Rusk Papers, 1824–1859. (5 ft., 6 in.)

Papers document the life of Rusk as a participant in the Texas Revolution, Chief Justice of the first Texas Supreme Court, major general in army campaigns against the Native Americans, president of the Convention of 1845, and one of Texas' first two U.S. Senators.

José Juan Sánchez-Navarro Papers, 1831–1839. (4 in.)

Provincial inventory prepared by Sánchez-Navarro (d. 1849) while he was adjutant inspector of Nuevo León and Tamaulipas contains, among notes and lists of troop expenses, Sánchez-Navarro's detailed description of the two major encounters between the Mexican and Texan forces in San Antonio de Béxar in which he participated and includes · plan of the Alamo showing positions of Mexican forces. Included are two military copy books with indexes containing correspondence, decrees, printed orders, and personal notes. In addition there are typescripts with English translations of excerpts from Carlos Sánchez-Navarro's book, La Guerra de Tejas; Memorias de un Soldado (The War in Texas; Memoirs of a Soldier), 1938, based upon the personal account of events inserted in the copy books by Jose Sánchez- Navarro.

Juan Nepomuceno Seguín Reminiscences, 1858. (1 item.)

Personal memoirs of Juan N. Seguín, political and military figure of the Texas Revolution and Republic of Texas.

Charmion Clair Shelby Papers, 1700–1718, 1835–1836, 1927–1933. (3.5 in.)

Historical narratives by Shelby, historian, concerning activities of the Mexican Army in preparing for the Texas campaign of 1836 and information relating to the formation and organization of the towns of Harrisburg and Washington in 1834 and 1835.

S. R. Shumway Narrative, undated. (1 item.)

Historical narrative by Shumway entitled The Mission Idyl: A Story of the Texas Revolution, a semi-fictional account of the Texas Revolution.

Julia Lee Sinks Papers, 1817, ca. 1840–1904. (1 ft.)

The first part of these papers are materials on the history of Fayette County. Secondly, there are scrapbooks originally compiled for the Texas Historical Association by Julia Sinks and later dismantled by the processor with the contents placed in folders. Miss Sinks collected historical items from her own and other families. These materials include personal correspondence, legal, and financial records, and certificates of appointments; of special note are reminiscences by early Texas settlers. The manuscript index (which was also compiled by Miss Sinks) is arranged alphabetically by surname, and includes a brief description of each document and its date. In addition, there are typescripts of newspaper articles she wrote in 1876 that are in notebooks entitled "Early Days in Texas."

Sam S. Smith Papers, 1797–1863. (1 in.)

Muster rolls, assistant rolls, army discharge, list of prisoners, list of cotton cards, and recipe of Sam S. Smith. Papers concern muster rolls of various contingents in the armies of the Republic of Texas, and the muster roll of Spanish forces in Texas (1797). Included are various official papers concerning military units or individuals in the service of Mexico or Texas (1836–1863). Also included are lists of cotton cards sold by Smith.

Texas Revolution Scrapbook. (1 vol.)

Newspaper clippings, principally from the 1930s, relate various aspects of the Texas Revolution.

Amasa Turner Papers, 1837–1876. (3 in.)

Turner was a soldier, legislator and pioneer Texas settler. Papers include Turner's recollections of the beginnings of the City of Galveston and some account of his service in the Army of the Republic of Texas; reminiscences of the Texas Revolution and Battle of San Jacinto; and "Amasa Turner and the Regular Army of Texas, " a biography by Miller Harwood.

Amelia Worthington Williams Papers, 1815–1985. (4 ft.)

Educator and historian, born in Maysfield, Texas, the oldest child of a merchant and cotton planter, Williams earned a B. A. degree at Southwest Texas State Normal School (1922) and B A. and M. A. degrees (1926) and Ph. D. (1931) at the University of Texas. She taught in several rural Texas schools from 1904 to 1925. From 1925 until retirement in 1951, she taught American and British history at the University of Texas, where she also collaborated with Eugene C. Barker in researching, editing, and publishing the writings of Sam Houston. She was considered an authority on the 1836 siege of the Alamo, the subject of her doctoral dissertation, the first five chapters of which were published in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly of the Texas State Historical Association in 1933 and 1934. Correspondence, transcriptions of historical materials, research and class notes, printed materials, newspaper clippings, literary productions, diplomas, certificates, and photographic materials document the academic and professional careers of Amelia Williams, especially her various Texas history research projects. Correspondents include Samuel Asbury, Eugene C. Barker, L. W. Kemp, and Houston Wade. Although there are a few photostatic copies, the nineteenth-century materials do not comprise original documents, and most are available in published form.

Henry Woodland Autobiographical Notes, 1822–1839. (1 vol.)

Henry Woodland (b. 1822), soldier, recollects his childhood and later life, including his experiences as a Texas veteran and Mier prisoner.

Alamo, Siege of the

Jon Winfield Scott Dancy Papers, 1832 (1836–1856) 1977. (6 in.)

Papers of Dancy (1810–1866), Fayette County farmer and legislator during the Republic and early statehood periods, include seven volumes of a diary, army discharge papers, an essay and a speech, a list of legislators in 1841, and other related materials.

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
Williams (Samuel May) Letter

John Felloseby Letter, 1836. (1 item.)

Letter by John Felloseby, March 26–27, 1836, concerning the Texas Declaration of Independence and the fall of the Alamo.

James Hatch Papers, 1788–1929. (3 vols.)

Correspondence, memoirs, literary efforts, and genealogy of James Hatch, author, concerning the memoirs of Sylvanus Hatch describing his experiences in the Mexican War, Texas Revolution, and the Indian Wars. Papers also relate to the affairs of Calhoun County, Jackson County, and Mustang Gray’s Ranger Company. Includes manuscript of “Lest We Forget the Heroes of the Alamo.”

Ben Caldwell Prather Papers, 1831–1839. (1 ft., 7 in.)

Papers collected by Prather, amateur historian and gun collector, relate to James Bowie (1795–1836), hero of the Alamo, and to Prather (b. 1902) and include materials that highlight the Sandbar Duel and the controversy concerning whether James or his brother Rezin invented the Bowie knife. Born in Palestine, Texas, Prather was owner of a restaurant and the Bowie Knife Museum in Alexandria, Louisiana. The collection includes legal documents, narratives, correspondence, genealogical materials, notes, scrapbooks, newspaper clippings, and photographs. Some of the Bowie materials are photocopies. Scrapbooks contain pictures of the Bowie family.

José Juan Sánchez-Navarro Papers, 1831–1839. (4 in.)

Provincial inventory prepared by Sánchez-Navarro (d. 1849) while he was adjutant inspector of Nuevo León and Tamaulipas contains, among notes and lists of troop expenses, Sánchez-Navarro's detailed description of the two major encounters between the Mexican and Texan forces in San Antonio de Béxar in which he participated and includes · plan of the Alamo showing positions of Mexican forces. Included are two military copy books with indexes containing correspondence, decrees, printed orders, and personal notes. In addition there are typescripts with English translations of excerpts from Carlos Sánchez-Navarro's book, La Guerra de Tejas; Memorias de un Soldado (The War in Texas; Memoirs of a Soldier), 1938, based upon the personal account of events inserted in the copy books by Jose Sánchez-Navarro.

Bexar, Siege of

Martin Lalor Crimmins Papers, 1813–1954. (2 ft.)

Papers concern the career of Crimmins (1876–1955), army officer, herpetologist, and military historian, and relate to the military history of the U. S. Army and Confederate Army, Republic of Texas military forces, the Texas Revolution, Mexican War, Indian wars, Reconstruction in Texas, military medicine, Texas forts, and biographies of military officers. Included are correspondence, research files, notes, muster rolls, diary, maps, photographs, and manuscripts. Most historical documents are photostatic copies.

Thomas Jefferson Rusk Papers, 1824–1859. (5 ft., 6 in.)

Papers document the life of Rusk as a participant in the Texas Revolution, Chief Justice of the first Texas Supreme Court, major general in army campaigns against the Native Americans, president of the Convention of 1845, and one of Texas' first two U.S. Senators.

Coleto, Battle of

James Walker Fannin, Jr. Papers, 1836. (2 items.)

Correspondence regarding the surrender terms at Goliad and capitulation on the Coleto.

Convention of 1832

Moses and Stephen Fuller Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. (9 ft., 6 in.)

The Austin Papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin, documenting an era in Texas history marked by increased Anglo colonization, strained relations with the Mexican government, the Texas Revolution, and eventually the founding of the Republic of Texas. See also The Austin Papers, ed. by Eugene C. Barker. Washington D.C.: USGPO, 1924–1928

Convention of 1833

Moses and Stephen Fuller Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. (9 ft., 6 in.)

The Austin Papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin, documenting an era in Texas history marked by increased Anglo colonization, strained relations with the Mexican government, the Texas Revolution, and eventually the founding of the Republic of Texas. See also The Austin Papers, ed. by Eugene C. Barker. Washington D.C.: USGPO, 1924–1928

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
Convention of 1833 Memorial

Sam Houston Hearne Collection, 1820–1929. (11 in.)

Collection of Sam Houston Hearne, great-grandson of Sam Houston, consists primarily of Houston family correspondence, letters sent and received by Houston during and directly after the Texas Revolution and during his Texas presidency, and correspondence between Houston and Guy M. Bryan concerning Stephen F. Austin.

Convention of 1836

Richard Ellis Speech, 1836. (1 item.)

Remarks made by Richard Ellis at the Convention of 1836 concerning plans for loans Ellis and others had obtained, March 17, 1836.

Descendants of the Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence (Organization)

Descendants of the Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence Records, 1936–1940. (1 vol.)

Records include correspondence, lists of officers, legal papers, and copies of applications for membership in the organization.

General Council of 1835–1836

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
General Council Circular
General Council Ordinance

Goliad Campaign, Massacre

Eugene Campbell Barker Papers, 1785 (1812–1959). (19 ft.)

Papers produced by Barker (1874–1956), University of Texas historian and educator relate to the development of the Texas State Historical Association, the American Historical Association, and other learned societies; scholarly research and publication; teaching at the university; national historical affairs; Barker's consideration of academic freedom, tenure, and the administration of The University of Texas; his studies of the Fredonian Rebellion, Texas finances (1835–1836), Houston and the 1836 Campaign, miscellaneous data and sources in Texas history, Mexican Army and Mexican sources, Goliad and the Tampico Expedition, Texas-Mexican relations (1827–1834), causes of the Texas Revolution; letters concerning the writings of Sam Houston; transcriptions of documents concerning the Alamo, James Walker Fannin, Jr., James Grant, Francis W. Johnson, and William B. Travis; Stephen F. Austin; Anglo-American settlement in Texas; Austin's Colony; Austin in Mexico; Declaration of Independence; establishment of the Republic of Texas, civil government, land speculation, and nonmilitary events of 1836; native Latin American contributions to the colonization and independence of Texas; Texas relations with Great Britain, France, and Europe; William Barker family notes; Frederick Jackson Turner notes; miscellaneous notes on state banks, Virginia Convention of 1788, economic interpretation of the Constitution, the judiciary and slavery, Velasco, East Texas, expulsion of John Bradburn, Convention of 1833, homestead law in Texas, Mexia Expedition, religion, Peter Grayson, and impressions suggested by Sam Houston's writings; and records of Barker's major publications. The papers contain correspondence, speeches, lecture notes, research notes, literary productions, class records, scrapbooks, and photographs.

Joseph Henry Barnard Papers, 1836–1860, 1949–1982. (.5 in.)

Papers of Barnard (1804–1861),a surgeon who served with Col. James W. Fannin during the Texas Revolution in 1836, include Barnard's annotated list of men under the command of Fannin at Goliad. Barnard was captured with Fannin's forces, but his life was spared so he could treat wounded Mexicans. An 1844 list of members of the Eighth Congress of the Republic of Texas (1843–1844) relates to Barnard's term as a representative for Fort Bend County, and a ledger concerns his ranching activities in Goliad County. Printed material relates to Barnard, his family, and the history of Goliad.

John Sowers Brooks Letters, 1834–1856. (39 items.)

Letters written by Brooks (1814–1836), soldier, to members of his family and an acquaintance, as well as correspondence between members of the family and acquaintances of Brooks after the latter's death in the Goliad Massacre. Brooks's letters telÏ of his trips, his service in the United States Marine Corps, ravages of Asiatic cholera, his service as adjutant and aid to James Walker Fannin, Jr., during the Matamoros Expedition and at Goliad. These writings express sentiments of volunteer soldiers and portray their activities in the fight for Texas independence. The later correspondence concerns the death of Brooks at Goliad and attempts by his family to locate his personal effects, secure the land awarded him as a soldier in the Texas Revolution, and settle his estate. There is a typescript calendar of materials relating to Brooks, including these letters.

Fannie A. D. Baker Darden Narrative, 1870. (1 item.)

Historical narrative based on interview of Dillard Cooper by Darden (1829–1890) in Columbus and its publication in the Columbus Citizen (1870) gives an account of the escape of Cooper and three companions from the Goliad Massacre (1836).

Harbert Davenport Papers, 1800 (1835–1836) 1923. (3 ft. 2 in.)

Research materials collected by Davenport (1882–1957), Brownsville attorney and historian, document the political and military events connected with James Walker Fannin, Jr., and the military units and persons under his command, in the Goliad Campaigns. Materials consist of copies of correspondence, notes, historical narratives, reminiscences, biographical sketches, muster rolls and rosters, military, legal, and governmental records. Included also are a biographical sketch of James B. Wells (1850–1923), a Brownsville attorney and Davenport's law associate, and material dealing with litigation (1920–1921) concerning the Ojo de Agua, Karnes County stream.

Philip Dimmitt Papers, 1833–1849, 1879, 1904. (1 in.)

Papers concern Dimmitt (1801–1841), trader, merchant, and soldier in the Texas Revolution, consist of Photostats of letters in Spanish to Dimmitt from Ramón Músquiz, political chief of Béxar (1827–1835), about land and mercantile matters; one from Sam Houston in 1837 concerning supplies for the army; military records of Texan forces from November 1835 to January 1836 while under Dimmitt’s command at Goliad; material relating to Dimmitt’s estate and the genealogy of the Dimmitt family including a letter from John Sutherland to the administrator concerning property and notes taken when he and Dimmitt were captured by Mexican troops on Corpus Christi Bay in 1841; and an 1879 letter relating to the Greenback Party.

Hermann Ehrenberg Narrative, 1845. (1 item.)

Narrative by Ehrenberg (ca. 1818–1866) entitled Fahrten und Schicksale eines Deutschen in Texas [Travels and Fortunes of a German in Texas] was published in Germany in 1845 and was the third edition of his book which first appeared in 1843 as Texas und seine Revolution. In it, he recounts his adventures as a soldier in the Texas Revolution including his escape from the Goliad Massacre.

James Walker Fannin, Jr. Papers, 1836. (2 items.)

Correspondence regarding the surrender terms at Goliad and capitulation on the Coleto.

Charles William Ramsdell, Jr. Papers, 1749–1836. (2 vol.)

Papers concern Spanish Goliad and Refugio Mission, 1793–1825.

Goliad Declaration of Independence

Fletcher S. Stockdale Papers, ca. 1860–1875. (3 items.)

Copy of Houston Daily Telegraph item relating to Goliad convention and speech.

Gonzales Volunteers

Robert Bruce Blake Papers, 1690–1959, 1969–1970. (21 ft., 5 in.)

Ninety-seven volumes of this material consist of typewritten transcriptions made by Blake (1877–1955) of official records and personal papers found in the Office of the County Clerk in Nacogdoches, in the Nacogdoches Archives located in the Texas State Archives, in the General Land Office of Texas, and in The University of Texas Archives, much of the material having been translated from the Spanish by Blake and others. The purpose of the enterprise, to which Blake devoted a major part of his life, was to prepare a definitive documentary history of that portion of Spanish and Mexican Texas bordered by the present city of San Antonio on the west and by Nacogdoches on the east. Types of material transcribed include letters, literary productions, legal papers, financial papers, census records, subpoenas, jury verdicts, receipts, petitions, account papers, warrants, promissory notes, affidavits, powers of attorney, summonses, election returns, bills of slave sales, commissions, general bills of sale, resolutions, orders, civil-suit proceedings, criminal proceedings, marriage contracts, lists of jurors, grand-jury venires, proclamations, bonds, minutes, writs, certificates, field notes, broadsides, maps, and muster rolls. A calendar has been prepared for these volumes. Other materials include personal papers of Blake (correspondence, speeches, literary productions, financial records, notes, certificates, memorabilia, and miscellaneous), various documents used by Blake as historical sources for his productions (land records, transcripts of archival materials, biographical files, letters, historical accounts, diaries, military and civil government documents, newspaper clippings, and others, many of them photostatic copies of transcripts), and papers related to his career as a county clerk and court reporter (1914–1955) in Nacogdoches (1925–1942) and Austin (1943–1955), which include typed transcripts of court cases and instructions to juries.

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
John E. Garven Honorable Discharge

Grass Fight

Thomas Jefferson Rusk Papers, 1824–1859. (5 ft., 6 in.)

Papers document the life of Rusk as a participant in the Texas Revolution, Chief Justice of the first Texas Supreme Court, major general in army campaigns against the Native Americans, president of the Convention of 1845, and one of Texas' first two U.S. Senators.

Kentucky Volunteers

Martin McHenry Kenney Papers, 1836–1907. (1 in.)

Papers include muster roll of Kentucky volunteers, 1836; business and legal documents; clipping; literary productions; correspondence; and reminiscences.

Law of April 6, 1830

Moses and Stephen Fuller Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. (9 ft., 6 in.)

The Austin Papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin, documenting an era in Texas history marked by increased Anglo colonization, strained relations with the Mexican government, the Texas Revolution, and eventually the founding of the Republic of Texas. See also The Austin Papers, ed. by Eugene C. Barker. Washington D.C.: USGPO, 1924–1928

Runaway Scrape

Harriet Moore Page Potter Ames Reminiscences, undated. (1 vol.)

Memoirs of the era of the Texas Revolution and the Republic of Texas by Mrs. Ames, then the wife of Robert Potter, Secretary of the Texas Navy. Microfilm holdings include Samuel K. Lewis and Edward McGinnis v. Charles Ames and Harriet Ames.

Mary A. Polley Baylor Reminiscences. (2 vol.)

Recollections of early days in Texas, include accounts of the Runaway Scrape and of the prominent men and women who visited the family home. Baylor (b. 1827) was the daughter of Joseph Henry Polley and granddaughter of James Briton (Brit) Bailey, both members of Stephen F. Austin's "Old Three Hundred” settlers.

W. C. Blair Letter, 1842. (2 items.)

Photocopies of two letters. The first, from Blair at Egypt, Texas, to Walter Losorie, March 18, 1842, describes Blair's flight from the approaching Mexican army. The other, from Anna George to President Hayes, July 7, 1879, requests a pension for Blair's widow.

Guy Morrison Bryan Papers, 1838–1901. (3 ft.)

Collection concerns the career of Bryan (1821–1901), nephew of Stephen F. Austin, and deals with his education; his friendship with Rutherford B. Hayes; his service as state legislator and United States congressman; his activities during the Texas Revolution, the Mexican War, and the Civil War; his ranching enterprises and participation in the establishment of the Texas Cotton Bureau as well as the Texas Veteran Association and the Texas State Historical Association; and his personal and family life.

Nathan Boone Burkett Reminiscences, 1895. (1 item.)

"Early Days in Texas” is the autobiography of Burkett (b. 1820), soldier, surveyor, and hunter as told to his son-in-law John T. Hogwood. It relates to migration to Texas from Missouri; settlement in DeWitt’s Colony; the Runaway Scrape; Mexican invasion of 1842; Battle of Salado; early Christian missionaries in Gonzales County; surveys, deeds and buffalo hunts; Indian depredations; and anecdotes of pioneer life.

Ann Raney Thomas Coleman Papers, 1849–1892. (3 vols.)

Letters and reminiscences concern the life of Coleman (1810–1897) and relate to life in England, trip to America, life in the United States, experiences in the Texas Revolution, the Runaway Scrape, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

Jon Winfield Scott Dancy Papers, 1832 (1836–1856) 1977. (6 in.)

Papers of Dancy (1810–1866), Fayette County farmer and legislator during the Republic and early statehood periods, include seven volumes of a diary, army discharge papers, an essay and a speech, a list of legislators in 1841, and other related materials.

San Jacinto, Battle of

Samuel Tabor Allen Family Papers, 1759–1931. (3 in.)

Papers document Allen's personal, business, and political activities in Texas during the pre-Republic and Revolutionary period. The papers also contain materials concerning other Allen family members including: 70 letters from Caleb J. Allen, Jr., Allen's nephew, who served as a Union Army soldier in the Civil War; business and legal records of the Caleb J. Allen family, merchants in New London, Connecticut; correspondence of Stephen Haley Allen, 1896–1930; scrapbook materials pertaining to Frederick W. Abbott, elocutionist and actor, who was related to the Allen family by marriage.

Y. P. Alsbury Reminiscences, 1859, 1860. (1 vol.)

Recollections of the Battle of San Jacinto and the capture of Santa Anna, written by Alsbury to “Judges Weeks, Duncan, and S. A. Maveric[k].”

Moseley Baker Letter, 1844. (1 vol.)

Transcription made in 1894 of an 1844 letter intended for publication written by Baker (1802–1848), a captain in the Texan army at San Jacinto, to Sam Houston giving Baker's perspective on the battle and events leading up to it and highly unfavorable to Houston.

Jesse Billingsley Papers, 1835–1887. (6.5 in.)

Correspondence, land papers, and legal papers of Billingsley (1810–1880), soldier in the Texas Revolution and legislator for Bastrop County, pertains especially to land transactions and claims in the Bastrop area and throughout the Republic and to the controversy over Sam Houston's account of the San Jacinto campaign.

Robert Bruce Blake Papers, 1690–1959, 1969–1970. (21 ft., 5 in.)

Ninety-seven volumes of this material consist of typewritten transcriptions made by Blake (1877–1955) of official records and personal papers found in the Office of the County Clerk in Nacogdoches, in the Nacogdoches Archives located in the Texas State Archives, in the General Land Office of Texas, and in The University of Texas Archives, much of the material having been translated from the Spanish by Blake and others. The purpose of the enterprise, to which Blake devoted a major part of his life, was to prepare a definitive documentary history of that portion of Spanish and Mexican Texas bordered by the present city of San Antonio on the west and by Nacogdoches on the east. Types of material transcribed include letters, literary productions, legal papers, financial papers, census records, subpoenas, jury verdicts, receipts, petitions, account papers, warrants, promissory notes, affidavits, powers of attorney, summonses, election returns, bills of slave sales, commissions, general bills of sale, resolutions, orders, civil-suit proceedings, criminal proceedings, marriage contracts, lists of jurors, grand-jury venires, proclamations, bonds, minutes, writs, certificates, field notes, broadsides, maps, and muster rolls. A calendar has been prepared for these volumes. Other materials include personal papers of Blake (correspondence, speeches, literary productions, financial records, notes, certificates, memorabilia, and miscellaneous), various documents used by Blake as historical sources for his productions (land records, transcripts of archival materials, biographical files, letters, historical accounts, diaries, military and civil government documents, newspaper clippings, and others, many of them photostatic copies of transcripts), and papers related to his career as a county clerk and court reporter (1914–1955) in Nacogdoches (1925–1942) and Austin (1943–1955), which include typed transcripts of court cases and instructions to juries.

Moses Austin Bryan Papers, 1824–1897, 1926. (1 ft., 6 in.)

Papers of Bryan (1817–1895), soldier, postmaster, and county commissioner, relate to his activities as secretary to his uncle Stephen F. Austin, secretary of the Texas legation to the United States in 1839, major in the Civil War, and organizer and secretary of the Texas Veteran Association. Included are Bryan's recollections of Austin and of the Texas Revolution and following events and petitions for admission to the Texas Veteran Association detailing the service of the applicants. In addition there is a letter from Aaron Burr (1832) to Jane McManus concerning her proposed colonization project and enclosing a letter of introduction to Judge Workman in New Orleans with the request that he introduce her to Stephen F. Austin.

Lorenzo de Zavala Papers, 1818–1936. (4 in.)

The papers deal with the political career of Zavala who was intimately concerned with the independence movement in Mexico and, later, in Texas. Included is Zavala's political correspondence with the leading figures of the day, including especially Antonio López de Santa Anna and José Antonio Mexia, as well as financial and legal documents, which involve in part Zavala's land grant and his colonization efforts. In addition the collection contains a manuscript of an article written by Zavala on Mayan ruins and biographical and genealogical information about the Zavala family.

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
Charles E. Gilbert, Sr. Papers
Legislative Record Excerpt
“The Texian Grand March” Sheet Music
Patrick Usher Honorable Discharge

Sam Houston Hearne Collection, 1820–1929. (11 in.)

Collection of Sam Houston Hearne, great-grandson of Sam Houston, consists primarily of Houston family correspondence, letters sent and received by Houston during and directly after the Texas Revolution and during his Texas presidency, and correspondence between Houston and Guy M. Bryan concerning Stephen F. Austin.

George A. Hill, Jr. Address, 1936. (1 item.)

Address given at the Centennial Celebration of the Battle of San Jacinto, 1936.

Sam Houston Papers, 1814 (1836–1861) 1937. (6 ft., 5 in.)

Papers document the life of Sam Houston, including military service, as congressman from and governor of Tennessee, as commander-in-chief of the army in the Texas Revolution, as president of the Republic of Texas, as United States senator from and governor of the state of Texas. Many important state and national figures, especially Andrew Jackson, are represented, as well as personal friends and family members.

Temple Lea Houston Papers, 1880. (3 items.)

Papers include speech on the Battle of San Jacinto, given on April 21, 1880, in Independence, Texas; and a review of Homer S. Thrall's History of Texas.

Hobart Huson Papers, 1836, 1935, 1938,1943. (5 in.)

Papers include essay “Military History of Battle of San Jacinto”; and several addresses regarding the Texas Revolution.

Louis Wiltz Kemp Papers, 1819–1956. (23 ft.)

Louis Wiltz Kemp (1881–1956) was born in Cameron, Texas and studied engineering at the University of Texas before embarking on a long career with Texaco. Throughout his life he was an avid historian and collector of Texana, and he played a key role in the improvement and development of the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. Kemp also was active in the planning and building of the San Jacinto Monument and Museum. He was a member of the Texas State Library Board and served as president of the Texas State Historical Association from 1942 to 1946. Kemp's rich collection of Texana was eventually purchased by the Houston Endowment and the University of Texas, and now resides in the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History. Collection includes scrapbooks, committee papers, correspondence, biographical and historical files, diaries, research material, page proofs, photographs and other material related to Kemp's work.

John McKenzie Letter, 1838. (1 item.)

Photocopy of letter written by John McKenzie describing his travels from Ohio to Texas and how he became captain of a steamboat on the Brazos River. Also mentions incidents relating to the Battle of San Jacinto.

Thomas Jefferson Rusk Papers, 1824–1859. (5 ft., 6 in.)

Papers document the life of Rusk as a participant in the Texas Revolution, Chief Justice of the first Texas Supreme Court, major general in army campaigns against the Native Americans, president of the Convention of 1845, and one of Texas' first two U.S. Senators.

San Jacinto Battle Report, 1836. (.5 in.)

Report of the Battle of San Jacinto.

San Jacinto Descendants Records, 1800-.

Santa Anna's San Jacinto Field Orders, 1836. (1 item.)

Broadside of three orders of Santa Anna to the Mexican Army of Operations, dated San Jacinto, April 22, 1836, issued after his capture.

Julia Lee Sinks Papers, 1817, ca. 1840–1904. (1 ft.)

The first part of these papers are materials on the history of Fayette County. Secondly, there are scrapbooks originally compiled for the Texas Historical Association by Julia Sinks and later dismantled by the processor with the contents placed in folders. Miss Sinks collected historical items from her own and other families. These materials include personal correspondence, legal, and financial records, and certificates of appointments; of special note are reminiscences by early Texas settlers. The manuscript index (which was also compiled by Miss Sinks) is arranged alphabetically by surname, and includes a brief description of each document and its date. In addition, there are typescripts of newspaper articles she wrote in 1876 that are in notebooks entitled "Early Days in Texas."

W. C. Swearingen Letters, 1930. (1 vol.)

Correspondence concerning W. C. Swearingen and the Battle of San Jacinto.

Amasa Turner Papers, 1837–1876. (3 in.)

Turner was a soldier, legislator and pioneer Texas settler. Papers include Turner's recollections of the beginnings of the City of Galveston and some account of his service in the Army of the Republic of Texas; reminiscences of the Texas Revolution and Battle of San Jacinto; and "Amasa Turner and the Regular Army of Texas, " a biography by Miller Harwood.

Benjamin Young Play, 1861. (1.25 in.)

The Lone Star, or The Texan Bravo, a manuscript play about the Battle of San Jacinto.

Tampico (Mexico), Battle of

Francis Collins Papers, 1826–1871. (5 in.)

Papers concern the military career of Collins (1820–1882), artillery officer in the Mexican War, and include his letters from West Point (1842–1844), his journal and reminiscences about the war, and family correspondence to Isaac Clinton Collins, student and teacher in New York.

Texas Declaration of Independence

Moses and Stephen Fuller Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. (9 ft., 6 in.)

The Austin Papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin, documenting an era in Texas history marked by increased Anglo colonization, strained relations with the Mexican government, the Texas Revolution, and eventually the founding of the Republic of Texas. See also The Austin Papers, ed. by Eugene C. Barker. Washington D.C.: USGPO, 1924–1928

Evelyn Burress Papers, 1839, 1869, 1936–1946. (2 in.)

Papers of Burress, genealogist, who, with her husband Walter M. Burress, was responsible for the preservation and restoration of many historic Texas buildings. Correspondence concerns family history and restoration activities.

George Campbell Childress Papers, 1794–1859. (1 in.)

Childress, a lawyer, was the author of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Papers consist of letters written by Childress to his second wife, Rebecca Jennings Childress, during Childress's five trips from Tennessee to Texas (1834–1841), and letters between Jennings family members (1828–1874) including letters from Childress's mother-in-law, Ann Jennings of Nashville, Tennessee, to her daughters. Also included are legal documents, several photographs, and a bible given by Rebecca Childress to her daughter Ann Childress.

Eberstadt Collection, 1699–1959. (4 ft., 9 in.)

Items related to the Texas Revolution can be found in the Eberstadt Collection finding aid under the following headings:
Texas Declaration of Independence

John Felloseby Letter, 1836. (1 item.)

Letter by John Felloseby, March 26–27, 1836, concerning the Texas Declaration of Independence and the fall of the Alamo.

Texas Declaration of Independence Autograph Collection, 1822–1881, 1929– . (1 in.)

Collection includes newspaper clippings, letter, and memorandum about the Texas Declaration of Independence as well as photocopies of documents containing autographs of some of the signers.

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Maps

Maps and surveys listed by subject then by year of drafting/publication. This is a selective list.

1834

Burr, David H., Texas, By David H. Burr. New York: J.H. Colton & Co.

1835

Austin, Stephen Fuller, Map of Texas with Parts of the Adjoining States Complied by Stephen F Austin. Philadelphia: H.S. Turner. 1835 (1833).

Bradford, Thomas Gamaliel, Texas. Unsigned, undated.

Map of Spanish Texas. 1835. Unsigned.

Map of the Colonization Grants to Zavala, Vehiein & Burnet in Texas, Belonging to the Galveston Bay & Texas Land Co. New York: Stiles & Co. Boston: Printed by M. Hawes.

New Map of Texas and Coahuila, as Mexican Territory 1835–36. Houston: 1938.

1836

Austin, Stephen Fuller, . . .A Rough Topographical Sketch of the Route or Different Routes from the Rio Grande to the Capital or City of Mexico.

Austin, Stephen Fuller, The General Land Office, The State of Texas. Austin: General Land Office, 1836.

Labastida, Ygnacio de, Plano de la Cuidad de San Antonio de Bejar y Fortificacion del Alamo...

Map of Texas Containing the Latest Land Grants & Discoveries by E. F. Lee. Cinncinati: J.A. James & Co., 1836.

The Republic of Texas, 1836. San Antonio, Harvey F. Fletcher Cartographic Galleries, 1836.

The Routes of Santa Anna's & Houston's Armies. Unsigned, 1836.

Young, James Hamilton. A New Map of Texas, with the Contiguous American and Mexican States by J. H. Young. Philadelphia: Augustus Mitchell.

1837

Groves, H (lithographer). Map of the Republic of Texas Showing its Division into Counties and Latest improvements to 1837 Complied and Written on Stone by H. Groves Lithc. Office. New Orleans: 1837.

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Newspapers and Periodicals

This is a selective list. Most holdings are incomplete. Check UTCAT for holdings information. Contact the reference staff for assistance. HC=hardcopy, MF=microfilm, RP=facsimile reproduction.

Swenson, Helen S. Early Texas News, 1831–1848. Abstracts from early Texas newspapers. S.l.: s.n., c1984. (Printed compilation.)

Brazoria, Texas

Advocate of the People's Rights. Feb. 22, Mar.27, 1834 HC

Constitutional Advocate & (Texas) Public Advertiser. Sep. 5, 1832; Jun. 15, 1833 HC, RP, MF

Texas Republican. Jul. 5 1834–Mar. 2, 1836, Incomplete holdings. HC, MF.

Houston, Texas

Telegraph and Texas Register. Oct.10, 1835–Sep. 9,1837. Incomplete holdings. HC, RP, MF

Nacogdoches, Texas

Texean & Emigrant's Guide. Nov.28, 1835; Jan. 2 1836. HC, RP, MF

General Reference Index

Selective subject index to articles in periodical literature pertaining to the Texas Revolution. Includes: Alamo, Battle of; Anahuac Disturbance; Goliad, Battle of; San Jacinto, Battle of; Texas Militia, Texas Navy; Velasco, Battle of; as well as names of individuals. More about the General Reference Index.

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Publications

General

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Conservatives and Renegades in Texas Revolution, Documents, 1835. Washington, D.C.: Southern History Association, 1904.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Documents on the Texas Revolution. Washington, D.C.: Southern History Association, 190?.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Organization of the Texas Revolution. S.I.:s.n., 1901.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Source Readings in Texas History. Austin, TX: University of Texas, 1916.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The United States and Mexico, 1835–1837. Lincoln, NE: Mississippi Valley Historical Association, 1914.

Binkley, William C. Official Correspondence of the Texan Revolution, 1835–1836. New York: D. Appleton-Century Co., 1936.

Binkley, William C. The Texas Revolution. Austin, TX: Texas State Historical Association, 1979.

Borroel, Roger. The Texan Revolution of 1836: a Concise Historical Perspective Based on Original Sources. 1st ed. East Chicago, IN: "La Villita" Publication, 1989, cl988.

Boyd, Bob. The Texas Revolution: a Day-by-Day Account. San Angelo, TX: San Angelo Standard-Times, 1986.

Burnet, David Gouverneur. Compendium of the Early History of Texas. San Marcos, TX: Southwest Texas State Teachers College, 1935.

Carefoot, Jean. A Selected Glossary of the Texas Revolution. Austin, TX: Archives Division, Texas State Library, 1986.

Child, David Lee. The Texan Revolution. Republished with Additions from the Northampton (Massachusetts) Gazette, to Which is Added a Letter from Washington on the Annexation of Texas and the late Outrage in California. Washington, D.C.: J. & G.S. Gideon, Printers, 1843.

Downs, Fane. The History of Mexicans in Texas, 1820–1845. Lubbock TX: Texas Tech University, 1970.

Ehrenberg, Hermann. Texas und Seine Revolution. English. (With Milam and Fannin; Adventures of a German Boy in Texas' Revolution.) Austin, TX: Pemberton Press, 1968.

Filisola, Vicente. Memoirs for the History of the War in Texas. 1st ed. Austin, TX: Eakin Press, 1985.

Houston, Andrew Jackson. Texas Independence. Deluxe ed. Houston, TX: Anson Jones Press, 1938.

Jenkins, John H., ed. The Papers of the Texas Revolution, 1835–1836. Austin, TX: Presidial Press, 1973.

Johnson, William Weber. The Birth of Texas. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 1960.

Lack Paul D. The Texas Revolutionary Experience: a Political and Social History, 1835–1836. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1992.

Lane, Walter Paye. The War for Texas Independence. Austin, TX: Jenkins Pub. Co., 1985.

Leclerc, Frederic. Texas and its Revolution. (1st English ed.) Houston, TX: A. Jones Press, 1950.

Lindley, Thomas Ricks. To Fight the Mexican Eagle: the Ewings of the Texas Revolution. Austin, TX: Texian Army Investigations, 1993.

Newell, Chester. History of the Revolution In Texas. Particularly of the War of 1835 & '36. New York: Arno Press, 1973, c1838.

Snoke, Elizabeth R. The Mexican War: a Bibliography of Military History Research Collection Holdings for the Period 1835–1850. Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army Military History Research Collection, 1973.

Staffelbach, Elmer Hubert. For Texas and Freedom. S.l.: Macree-Smith Co., 1948.

The Texas Revolution from Anahuac to San Jacinto, 1832–1836. Austin, TX: Forest Glen TV Productions, 1989 (Video cassette).

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Biographies

Austin, Stephen Fuller

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Stephen F. Austin and the Independence of Texas. Austin,TX: s.n., 1910.

Bryan, Moses Austin. Personal Recollections of Stephen F. Austin. Dallas, TX: Texas Magazine Co., 1897.

Burleson, Edward

Jenkins, John Holmes. Edward Burleson: Texas Frontier Leader. Austin, TX: Jenkins Pub. Co., 1990.

Burnet, David

Carnes, Ruth J.From New Jersey to Texas: David Gouverneur Burnet, President of a New Republic. 1st ed. Austin, TX: Eakin Press, 1986.

Hinds, Walton. Life of David G. Burnet. TX: s.n., 193?.

Crockett, David

Crockett, Davy, Davy Crockett's Own Story as Written by Himself; the Autobiography of America's Great Folk Hero. New York: Citadel Press, 1955.

Crockett, Davy. Life of David Crockett the Original Humorist and irrepressible Backwoodsman.' Comprising His Early History. Philadelphia, PA: Porter & Coates, 1865.

Smith, Richard Penn. Col. Crockett's Exploits and Adventures in Texas: Wherein is Contained a Full Account of his Journey from Tennessee to the Red River. Cincinnati, OH: V.P. James, 1839, c1836.

Houston, Samuel

Burnet, David Gouverneur. Review of the Life of Gen. Sam Houston: as Recently Published in Washington City by J.T. Towers. Galveston, TX: News Power Press Print, 1852.

Hynds, Alexander. General Sam Houston. S.l.: s.n., 1884.

Souvenir: Contents, Life of Sam Houston, Fall of the Alamo, Massacre of Goliad, Story of the battle of San Jacinto. Houston, TX: E.R. Scott, 1928.

Santa Ana, Antonio Lopez de, 1794?–1876

Cartas de Santa-Anna Publicadas. Merida de Yucatan: lmpr. del Boletin Comercial,1842.

Emerson, Walter Caruth. The Truth About Santa Anna. Dallas, TX: Cardinal Press, 1973.

Santa Anna, Antonio Lopez de. The Eagle: the Autobiography of Santa Anna. Austin, TX: State House Press, 1988 (1967).

Valades, Jose C. Mexico, Santa Anna y la Guerra de Texas. 3: ed., nuevamente rev. y corr. Mexico: Editores Mexicanos Unidos, 1965 (1936).

Seguin, Juan Nepomucena

Jaxon. Recuerden el Alamo: the True Story of Juan N. Seguin and His fight for Texas Independence. Berkeley, CA: Last Gasp, 1979.

Travis, William B

McDonald, Archie P. Travis. Austin, TX: Jenkins Pub. Co., 1976.

Collected Biographies

Adair, A. Garland. Travis, Bowie, Bonham and Davy Crockett. Austin, TX: s.n., 1955.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Funeral of the "Heroes of the Alamo." Austin?, TX: Texas State Historical Association, 1907.

Block W. T. A Jefferson County Militiaman of the Texas Revolution: Jacob Harmon Garner. Texas: s.n., 1991.

Butterfield, Jack C. Men of the Alamo, Goliad and San Jacinto. San Antonio, TX: The Naylor Company, 1936.

Dixon, Sam Houston. The Men Who Made Texas Free: the Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence—Sketches of Their Lives and Patriotic Services. Houston, TX: Texas Historical Publishing Company, 1924.

Jackson, Jack. Los Telanos. Stamford, CT: Fantagraphics Books, 1982.

Kemp, Louis WiItz. The Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. Houston, TX: Anson Jones Press, 1944.

Lozano, Ruben Rendon. Viva Tejas: the Story of the Tejanos, the Mexican-born Patriots of the Texas Revolution. San Antonio, TX: Alamo Press, 1985 (1936).

Rosenthal, Phil. Roll Call at the Alamo. Ft. Collins, CO: Old Army Press, 1985.

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Campaigns

Alamo, Siege of the

Alamo—the Price of Freedom. San Antonio, TX: Rivertheatre Associates, Ltd., 1993.

The Alamo: 1984 Long Barrack Museum History Panels. (San Antonio?, TX): Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1984.

Chabot, Frederick C. The Alamo: Mission, Fortress and Shrine. San Antonio, TX: The Leake Company, 1935.

Elfer, Maurice. Heroic' Story of the Alamo. Chicago, IL: Schwartzkopf mimeo ser., 1938.

Ford, John Salmon. History. Battles and Fall of the Alamo: with Points of Interest, etc., of San Antonio, Texas. Austin, TX: L.F. Meyers, 1896.

Haythornthwaite, Philip J. The Alamo and the War of Texan Independence 1835–36. London: Osprey, 1986.

Lynch, James D. Siege of the Alamo. S.l.: s.n., n.d.

Myers, John Myers, The Alamo. 1st ed. New York: E.P. Dutton, 1948.

Readings On the Alamo. 1st ed. New York: Vantage Press, 1987.

Tinkle, Lon. 13 Days to Glory. the Siege of the Alamo. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1985 (1958).

Williams, Amelia W. A Critical Study of the Siege of the Alamo and of the Personnel of its Defenders. S.I.: s.n., 1933.

Bexar, Siege of

Maverick, Samuel Augustus. Notes on the Storming of Bexar in the Close of 1835. San Antonio, TX: Artes Graficas, 1942.

Texas. Army. Army Orders. Convention Hall Washington, March 2 1836.: War is raging on the frontiers. Bejar is besieged by two thousand of the enemy. San Felipe de Austin: Baker and Bordens, 1836.

Goliad Campaign of 1836, Goliad Massacre

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Some Fannin Correspondence. (Austin?, TX): Texas State Historical Association, 1906.

Barrington, G. W. Back from Goliad. Dallas, TX: South-West Press, 1935.

Davenport, Harbert. Notes from an Unfinished Study of Fannin and His Men. Brownsville, TX: s.n., 1936.

Duval, John C. The Story of an Escape From the Massacre at Goliad and an Extract From a Sketch of John Crittenden Duval "The Last Survivor." Houston, TX: Union National Bank, n.d.

Grimes, Roy. Gollad 130 years After: Refugio and Guadalupe, Victoria, March 1836–1966 Day-by-Day in the Words of Men Who Were There. (Victoria?, TX: Published as a series in the Victoria Advocate, February 27–April 1, 1966).

Harrison, E. J. The Thrilling Startling and Wonderful Narratlve of Lieutenant Harris on, Who Was Taken Prisoner at Goliad, Texas, in 1836. (New York?): s.n., 1957.

Huson, Hobart. Captain Phillip Dimmitt's Commandancy of Goliad 1835–1836: an Episode of the Mexican Federalist War in Texas. Austin, TX: Von Boeckmann-Jones Co., 1974.

Mansfield, Joseph J. The Goliad Massacre: its Place in History. Washington, D.C: Government Printing Office, 1928.

Morgan, Abel. An Acount (sic) of the Battle of Goliad and Fannings' (sic) Massacre: and the Capture and Imprisonment of Abel Morgan. Paducah, KY: s.n., 1847.

Oberste, William H. “Remember Goliad!". S.l.: s.n., 1949.

Urrea, Jose. Diario de las Operaciones Militares de Ia Division que al Mando del General Jose Urrea Hizo Ia Campana de Tejas. Victoria de Durango: lmpr. del gobierno a cargo de M. Gonzalez, 1838.

White, Nell. Goliad in the Texas Revolution. Austin, TX: Nortex Press, 1988.

San Jacinto, Battle of

Atkins, Winston. To the Plains of San Jacinto: an Exhibition Depicting Texas' Struggle for Independence, March 2–April 21, 1836. (Houston?, TX): San Jacinto Museum of History Association, 1986?.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The San Jacinto Campaign, 1874–1956. (Austin?, TX): Texas State Historical Association, 1901 (1901).

The Battle of San Jacinto. S.l.: s.n., 1844.

The Battle of San Jacinto, April 21, 1836: as Reported by General Santa Anna and Colonel Delgado of the Mexican forces. Houston, TX: Union National Bank 1928 (1936).

Binkley, William C. The Activities of the Texan Revolutionary Army after San Jacinto. Baton Rouge, LA: s.n.,1940 (1940).

Davis, J. Frank. The Road to San Jacinto. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1936.

Martinez Caro, Ramon. Verdadera Idea de Ia Primera Campana de Tejas y Sucesos Ocurridos Despues de la Accion de San Jacinto. Mexico: Imprenta de Santiago Perez a Cargo de A. Sojo, 1837.

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Causes

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Land Speculation as a Cause of the Texas Revolution. (Austin?,TX): Texas State Historical Association, n.d.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Mexico and Texas, 1821–1835; University of Texas Research Lectures on the Causes of the Texas Revolution. New York: Russell and Russell, 1965 (1928).

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Public Opinion in Texas Preceeding the Revolution. S.l.: s.n., 1911.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Some Causes of the Texan Declaration of Independence: (faculty address at the celebration of Texas independence Day) S.l: s.n., 1911.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Texan Declaration of Causes for Taking Up Arms Against Mexico. S.l.: s.n., 1912.

Lundy, Benjamin. The Origin and True Causes of the Texas Insurrection, Commenced in the Year 1835. Philadelphia, PA: s.n., 1836.

Lundy, Benjamin. The War in Texas: a Review of Facts and Circumstances, Showing that this Contest is a Crusade against Mexico. Philadelphia, PA: Printed for the publishers by Merrihew and Gunn, 1837.

Potter, Reuben Marmaduke. The Texas Revolution: Distinguished Mexicans Who Took Part in the Revolution of Texas, With Glances at its Early Events. (New York): s.n., 1878 (1878).

Shaw, Elton Raymond, The Conquest of the Southwest: a Discussion of the Charges That the Colonization of Texas and the Revolution Against Mexico... Berwyn, IL: Shaw Publishing Company, 1924.

Wharton, William H. Texas: a Brief Account of the Origin, Progress, and Present State of the Colonial Settlements of Texas. Nashville, TN: Printed by S. Nye, 1836.

Winston, James E. New Orleans and the Texas Revolution. New Orleans, LA: The Louisiana Historical Society. 1927.

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Finance

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Finances of the Texas Revolution. Boston, MA: Ginn and Company, 1904.

Frantz, Joe Bertram. The Mercantile House of McKinney & Williams, Underwriters of the Texas Revolution. (Boston?,MA): Business Historical Society, 1952.

McKinney, Thomas F. To All Who May Have Seen and Read the Dying Groans of Wm. Bryan, E Hall and Saml. Ellis: Ex-agents of Texas. Columbia: Office of the "Telegraph", 1836.

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Law and Legislation - Mexico

(Circular de 30 (i.e. treinta) de diciembre de 1835). (Mexico. Ministerio de Guerra y Marina) (Mexico City?): s.n., 1836.

Contestaciones Habidas Entre el Gobierno del Estado de Coahuila y Tejas, y la Comandancia Militar de Monclova: Con Motivo de las Ordene (Coahuila and Texas (Mexico)) Monclova: s.n., 1835.

Correspondance Entre la Legation Extraordinore du Mexique, a Washington, etie Ministere des Affaires Efrangeres des Etats-Unis. (Mexico. Legacion. United States.) Paris: Chez Truchy, 1837.

Correspondencia que ha Medlado la Legacion Extraordinaria de Mexico y el Deparfamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos. (Mexico. Legacion. United States.) Mexico: Editora Nacional, 1952 (1837).

Dictamen de la Comision Encargada de los Negocios de Teids Sobre las Proposiciones del Sr. Di. Carlos M Bustamante. (Mexico . Congreso. Comision Encargada de los Negocios de Tejas.) Mexico: Impr. de Jose M.F. de Lara, 1837.

Filisola, Vicente. Evacuation of Texas. Translation of the Representation Addressed to the Supreme Government. Columbia, (TX): G. & T.H. Borden, 1837.

Filisola, Vicente. Representacion Dirigida al Supremo Gobierno. Mexico: I. Cumplido, 1836.

Manifiesto del Congreso General en el Presente Ano. (Mexico. Congreso, 1836.) Mexico: J.M.F. de Lara,1836.

Sierra y Rosso, lgnacio. Representaclon Dirigida al Congreso Nacional, Mexico: I. Cumplido, 1837.

Supreme Government of the Free State of Coahuila and Texas. (Texas.(Province) Constitutional Governor.) S.l.: sn., 1836.

Tornel y Mendivil, Jose Maria. Tejas y los Estados-Unidos de America, en sus Relaclones con Ia Republica Mexicana. Mexico: I. Cumplido, 1837.

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Law and Legislation – United States/Texas

Austin, Stephen F. Esposicion al Publico Sobre los Asuntos de Tejas. Mexico: C.C. Sebring, 1835.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Convention of 1836. (Austin?, TX): Texas State Historical Association, 1909.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. Journal of the Permanent Council (October 11–27, 1835). (Texas?): Texas State Historical Association, 1904 (1904).

Capture of the Mexican Brig Urrea: Message From the President of the United States . . . Respecting the Capture and Restoration...(United States. Dept. of State.) Washington D.C.: s.n., 1838.

Chambless, Beauford. The Birth of Texas: the Ad-interim Government of the Republic of Texas: March, 1836–October, 1836. Waco, TX: B. Chambless, 1992.

Correspondence Between the Secretary of State and Cal, Peraza, Special Commissioner from the State of Yucatan. (Texas. Secretary of State.) Austin, TX: G.H. Harrison, 1841.

Correspondence with Mexico. In the House of Representatives of the U.S. May 19, 1836. (United States. Dept. of State) Washington D.C.: Blair and Rives, printers, 1836.

Correspondence with the Government of Mexico: Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting Reports from the Secretarie United States. (Dept. of State) Washington D.C.: Blair and Rives, printers, 1836.

Everitt, Stephen Hendrickson, Speech of Mr. Everett of Jasper, on the Message of the President, Returning the Resolution Making it Obligatory on Him to Consult. Columbia, TX: Printed at the Office of the Telegraph, 1836.

Houston, Sam, Documents of Major Gen. Sam Houston, Commander in Chief of the Texian Army to His Excellency David G. Burnet, Pres. of the Republic. Austin, TX: Pemberton Press, 1965 (1836).

Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte. Lamar's Prosecution of Santa Anna. Austin, TX: The Texas Historical Press, 191?.

Message from the President of the United States Relative to the Political, Military, and Civil Condition of Texas, Dec.22 1836. (United States. President (1829–1837: Jackson) Washington D.C.: s.n., 1836.

Message of Gov. Smith to General Council, Report of the Special Committee on the Message, Action of General Council to the People of Texas. (Texas. Provisional government. General Council.) S.l.: Baker and Bordens, n.d.

Proceedings of a Meeting of the Citizens of Nashville, Tenn., in Favor of Recognising the Independence of Texas. (Nashville, Tenn. Citizens.) Washington D.C.: Gales and Seaton, 1836.

Report of the Hon. Mosely Baker, Chairman of the Committee to Whom was Referred the Question of the Disposal of Gen. Santa Anna. (Texas (Republic) Congress. House. Select Committee on the Disposal of Gen. Santa Anna.) Columbia: Printed at the Office of the Telegraph, 1836.

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Velasco, Treaty of

Correspondence Relating to a Treaty of Peace Between Mexico and Texas, Upon the Basis of an Acknowledgment of the Independence...Washington D.C: National Register print, 1845.

Santa Anna, Antonio Lopez de. Manifesto que de sus Operaciones en Ia Campana de Tejas y en su Cautiverio Dirige a sus Conciudadanos. Veracruz: Imprenta liberal a cargo de A.M. Valades, 1837.

The Treaty of Velasco: El Paso Rare Document on Texas Independence. El Paso, TX: Texas Commerce Bank - El Paso, 1986.

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Military Affairs

Barker, Eugene Campbell. General Austin's Order Book for Campaign of 1835. Austin, TX: Texas State Historical Association, 1907.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Tampico Expedition. Houston, TX: Union National Bank, 1930.

Barker, Eugene Campbell. The Texan Revolutionary Army (Austin?, TX): Texas State Historical Association, 1906 (1906).

Barrera, Manuel. Then the Gringos Came—: the Story of Martin de Leon and the Texas Revolution: the Murder of Agapito de Leon, the Ambush of Silvestre. Laredo, TX: Barrera Publications, 1992.

Boddie, Mary Delaney. Thunder on the Brazos: the Outbreak of the Texas Revolution at Fort Velasco, June 26, 1832. Brazoria, TX: Brazoria County Historical Museum, 1978.

Documents of Major Gen. Sam Houston, Commander in Chief of the Texian Army to His Excellency David G. Burnet, President of the Republic. (Texas. Army.) Gonzales,TX: Inquirer Office,1874 (1836).

Dunn, Jeffrey D. Sesquicentennial News: a Daily Account of the Concluding Weeks of the Texas War for Independence. S.l.: s.n., 1986.

Hardin, Stephen L. Texian Iliad: a Military History of the Texas Revolution, 1835–1836. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 1994.

Henson, Margaret Swett. Juan Davis Bradburn: a Reappraisal of the Mexican Commander of Anahuac. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1982.

Houston, Sam. Letter of General Sam Houston to General Santa Anna. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Globe Office, 1852.

Houston, Sam. Speech of General Sam Houston, of Texas, Refuting Calumnies Produced and Circulated Against His Character as Commander-in-Chief. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Globe Office, 1859.

Jenkins, John Holmes. The Texas Navy. Los Diablos Tejanos on the High Seas. Palo Alto, CA: American West Pub. Co., 1968.

Matthews, Jay A. The Ten Battle Flags of the Texas Revolution. Austin, TX: Presidial Press, 1975.

Maxey, S. B. Address of Hon. S.B. Maxey of Texas: by invitation of the Texas Veteran Association. Washington, D.C: R.H. Darby, Printer. 1884.

Pierce, Gerald Swetnam. The Army of the Texas Republic, 1836–1845 University of Mississippi thesis, 1963.

Powell, E. Alexander. The Road to Glory. New York: C. Scribner's Sons, 1915.

Proceedings of the Convention of Texian Veterans: Held at Houston, May 13th, 14th and 15th, 1873: Together with a List of Veterans Now (Convention of Texian Veterans (1873: Houston, Tex.) Galveston, TX: Printed at the News Steam Book and Job Office, 1873.

Ruiz, Jose Francisco. Letter from Columbia, Texas, December 27, 1836, Addressed to Bias Herra. S.l.: s.n., 1966.

Santa Anna, Antonio Lopez de. The Mexican Side of the Texan Revolution (1836). TX: P.L. Turner Co., 1956.

Santos, Richard G. Santa Anna's Campaign Against Texas, 1835–1836: Featuring the Field Commands issued to Major General Vicente Filisola. Salisbury, N.C: Documentary Publications, 1981.

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Personal Narratives

Allan, T.C. Mrs. Reminiscences of Mrs. Annie Fagan Teal by Mrs. T. C. Allan. S.I.: s.n., 1897.

The Apology by a Volunteer of 1835. Houston. TX: s.n., 1846.

Austin, Stephen F. An Address Dilivered (sic) by S. F. Austin of Texas, to a Very Large Audience of Ladies and Gentlemen in the Second Presbyterian Church. Lexington, KY: J. Clarke & Co., Printers, 1836.

Barnard, J. H. Dr. J H. Barnard's Journal from December, 1835 to March 27th, 1836, Giving an Account of Fannin Massacre. Goliad, TX: Goliad Advance, 1912.

Duval, John C. The Story of an Escape from the Massacre at Goliad, and an Extract from a Sketch of John Crittenden Duval "The Last Survivor"... Houston, TX: Union National Bank n.d.

Ehrenberg, Herman. Der Freineitskampfin Texas im Jahre 1836. Leipzig: O. Wigand, 1844.

Field, Joseph E. Three Years in Texas: including a View of the Texan Revolution, and an Account of the Principal Battles, Boston: MA, Abel Tompkins, 1836.

Filisola, Vicente. Memoria spara la Historia de Ia Guerra de Tejas. Mexico: Imp. de I. Cumplido, 1849.

Gray, William F. From Virginia to Texas, 1835 Diary of Col Wm. F. Gray Giving Details of His Journey to Texas and Return in 1835–1836 and Second Journey. Houston, TX: Fletcher Young, 1965 (1909).

Lane, Walter Paye. The Adventures and Recollections of General Walter P. Lane, a San Jacinto Veteran; Containing Sketches of the Texan, Mexican and Late... Marshall, TX: s.n., 1928.

Lundy, Benjamin. The Life, Travels and Opinions of Benjamin Lundy. New York: A.M. Kelley, 1971.

Mahan, Phineas Jenks. Reminiscences of the War for Texas Independence: a Narative (sic) of Some of the Thrilling Adventures, Marvelous Escapes from Death. (Houston, TX): s.n., n.d.

Parker, A. A. Trip to the West and Texas. Comprising aJourney of Eight Thousand Miles, Through New-York Michigan, Illinois, Missouri, Louisiana... Concord, NH: White and Fisher, 1835.

Peña, José Enrique de la. Le Rebelion de Texas: Manuscrito Inedito de 1836. Mexico: s.n., 1955.

Peña, José Enrique de la. With Santa Anna in Texas: a Personal Narrative of the Revolution. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 1975.

Postel, Charles. Adventures in Texas. Philadelphia, PA: James Mi. Campbell, 1844.

Potter, Reuben M. The Prisoners of Matamoros: a Reminiscence of the Revolution of Texas. S.l.: s.n., 1879.

Sánchez-Navarro y Peón, Carlos. La Guerra de Tejas; Memorias de un Soldado. Mejico: Editorial Polis, 1938.

Swisher, John Milton, The Swisher Memoirs. San Antonio, TX: The Sigmund Press, Inc., 1932.

A Visit to Texas: Being the Journal of a Traveler Through Those Parts Most Interesting to American Settlers. New York: Van Nostrand and Dwight, 1836.

Warren, Edward. The General's Tight Pants: Edward Warren's Texas Tour of 1836. Austin, TX: Pemberton Press, 1976.

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Vertical Files

The vertical files contain newspaper clippings, pamphlets, and other ephemera, grouped by subject. This is a selective list. See also the names of individuals involved in the Texas Revolution in the biographical vertical file catalog. You may also search the online Vertical Files Index.

Texas History - Revolution, 1834–1837 (file and scrapbook)

Texas History Scrapbook #1

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