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Austin Papers, 1676, 1765–1889. 9 ft. 6 in.
Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin
The Austin Papers are recognized as the premier collection of original documentation for the Anglo-American colonization of Texas. The papers are composed primarily of the collected personal and official records of Moses Austin and Stephen F. Austin and consist of personal correspondence, maps, broadsides, business and legal records, government documents, pamphlets, minutes of meetings, and a variety of other material. The papers contain information about Austin family experiences in Virginia, Missouri, and Arkansas, but the vast majority of the papers relate to Stephen F. Austin's career as an empresario and political leader in Texas.
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Béxar Archives, 1717–1836. 168 ft.
Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin
The Béxar Archives are the principal resource for the Spanish and Mexican history of Texas through 1836. Particularly rich in administrative, social, and ethnohistory, they are an essential source for any scholar interested in the history of the Borderlands. Documents relate to governmental administration and to all aspects of military, ecclesiastical, and civil life in Spanish and Mexican Texas. The records provide comprehensive documentation for the general governmental administration of the province and later state; the establishment of presidios, settlements, and missions; French threats in the eighteenth century; the founding of San Antonio, Espiritu Santo, and other settlements; control measures against the Indians; relationships between the clergy and the military; the establishment and development of the settlement of the Canary Islanders; administrative investigations; fortifications; livestock raising; mail communication; transportation; fencing; grazing; commerce; slavery; agriculture; legal proceedings; foreign intervention and infiltration; eighteenth-century imperial struggles; shipwrecks off the Gulf Coast; colonization; efforts to consolidate imperial control and establish better communications; revolutionary movements; Anglo-American settlement; collapse of the Spanish Empire; the Mexican Empire; the Republic of Mexico; the Texas Revolution; and the establishment of the Republic of Texas. The vast majority of the records deals with the period after 1800.
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