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The University of Texas at Austin

The Briscoe Center for American History remains temporarily closed in line with university policy toward Covid-19. While the university is holding some classes on campus, many functions are still being conducted remotely, including a majority of those provided by the Briscoe Center. This policy applies to the center's exhibit spaces, classrooms, reading room, public services and off campus divisions, which include the Briscoe-Garner Museum in Uvalde, the Sam Rayburn Museum in Bonham and Winedale in Round Top. Most of our staff are working remotely and we continue to respond to online queries and requests. Updates to this policy will be posted on this page.

American Rhapsody

Briscoe Center presents American Rhapsody

The Briscoe Center proudly presents American Rhapsody, a new podcast that focuses on those who have witnessed the nation's history firsthand, creating archives in the process, and those who use those collections and others at the center to tell the American story.

Flash of Light, Wall of Fire

Briscoe Center Publishes Flash of Light, Wall of Fire

The Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin announces the Anti-Nuclear Photographer's Movement of Japan collection, a large archive of rare atomic bombing photographs.

The Jack Brooks Papers Project

The Jack Brooks Papers Project

The Briscoe Center has launched a new digital humanities project that focuses on the 42 years of legislative service by Congressman Jack Brooks.

Women's History Exhibit Goes Online

Women's History Exhibit Goes Online

The Briscoe Center has released a digital panorama of its current physical exhibit, "On with the Fight!" which documents over 150 years of women's activism. The project (currently in beta) premiered for Austin Museum Day.

South of Slavery

South of Slavery

Mariah Hammack’s work focuses on the experiences of enslaved women, indentured servants, Black Seminole refugees, and free blacks who took solace in escaping the United States to live in a "free" Mexico. She is a former Briscoe Center fellow and researches under the supervision of Professor Daina Berry, chair of UT’s Department of History.